Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCoal
IN THE NEWS

Coal

BUSINESS
July 20, 1988 | Associated Press
Coal industry officials predicted Tuesday that the nation's coal companies will have record production this year, as some utilities turn to coal-fired generators to replace hydroelectric power in this summer of drought and searing heat. In a midyear production forecast, the National Coal Assn. said production of bituminous, anthracite and lignite coal should total 926 million tons in 1988, up 9 million tons from last year's record.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1993 | GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of negotiations between port officials and overseas investors, the Los Angeles City Council has approved plans for a $180-million coal exporting facility that backers say will bring thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in new revenue to the harbor area. The size and location of the project, however, have been questioned by the city of Long Beach, which filed a lawsuit two weeks ago challenging the adequacy of the proposal's environmental impact report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1987 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Not long after the cargo ship Fort Providence set sail from New Orleans last month with 54,000 tons of coal destined for a power plant in Taiwan, its captain and crew discovered they had a problem. The British-owned ship's $2-million cargo was heating up to dangerous temperatures. "After passing through the Panama Canal, the captain sent a cable advising us that the coal was too hot" to continue the voyage, said C. P.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the next decade, electricity demand around the ever-brightening Pacific Rim will likely quadruple the capacity of Asian coal-fired power plants, opening an enormous potential market for U.S. coal. With it could come a big market for environmentally advanced clean-burning technology, if U.S. firms can stay in the competition. Now, U.S.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2010
Richmond, Va.-based Massey Energy Co. is the largest coal producer in central Appalachia, operating 47 underground and surface mines in Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. It was founded in 1920 as a coal brokering business and began mining operations in 1945. In 2009, Massey reported coal revenue of $2.3 billion and recorded net income of $104.4 million. Massey reported employment of 5,851 at the end of 2009. The company has repeatedly fended off organizing drives by the United Mine Workers of America and the union currently represents 76 Massey employees, union spokesman Phil Smith said.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1997 | ERIKA CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creating a critical link between America's Western coal mines and the Pacific Rim, the new Los Angeles Export Terminal is expected to help boost exports for the nation's $17.9-billion coal industry, city officials and business leaders said Thursday as they inaugurated the state-of-the art, $200-million facility at Terminal Island.
SCIENCE
November 18, 2007 | Alan Zarembo, Times Staff Writer
Coal, the dirtiest fossil fuel, is the crack cocaine of the developing world. It is the inexpensive and plentiful fuel powering the rising economies of Asia -- and because of that, it has become one of the most intractable problems in combating global warming. Even as the political will and grass-roots support to rein in rising carbon dioxide levels is growing, a large segment of the world is using more coal than ever.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
There is so much coal here, the ground has smoked for centuries from spontaneous combustion and the cliff walls have turned scarlet from the heat. There also is so much wild country here that writers have compared the lonely buttes, boulder-strewn canyons and fractured table lands to the biblical wilderness where Christ went to renounce worldly temptations.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | MICHAEL HIRSH, Associated Press
In the flower garden in front of Dr. Donald P. Vrabec's house is a large lump of coal, a conversation piece that sometimes puzzles visitors. "From time to time, people will think this is pretty unsightly and say, 'Don, why don't you get that ugly lump of coal out of your flower bed?' And I'll say to them, 'I think it's beautiful,' or else, simply, 'It's a reminder,' " Vrabec said.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2007 | Richard Simon and Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writers
For years, coal-country lawmakers have talked about turning the abundant natural resource into a fuel for motor vehicles. The idea went nowhere. But now it has taken on momentum, oddly enough, just as Congress appears ready to pass legislation to fight global warming. Even though coal has been attacked as a major culprit in climate change, lawmakers say a coal-derived fuel could solve another problem: U.S. dependence on foreign oil.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|