Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCoal
IN THE NEWS

Coal

BUSINESS
December 5, 1997 | ERIKA CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creating a critical link between America's Western coal mines and the Pacific Rim, the new Los Angeles Export Terminal is expected to help boost exports for the nation's $17.9-billion coal industry, city officials and business leaders said Thursday as they inaugurated the state-of-the art, $200-million facility at Terminal Island.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
April 7, 2010
Richmond, Va.-based Massey Energy Co. is the largest coal producer in central Appalachia, operating 47 underground and surface mines in Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. It was founded in 1920 as a coal brokering business and began mining operations in 1945. In 2009, Massey reported coal revenue of $2.3 billion and recorded net income of $104.4 million. Massey reported employment of 5,851 at the end of 2009. The company has repeatedly fended off organizing drives by the United Mine Workers of America and the union currently represents 76 Massey employees, union spokesman Phil Smith said.
NEWS
September 3, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
There is so much coal here, the ground has smoked for centuries from spontaneous combustion and the cliff walls have turned scarlet from the heat. There also is so much wild country here that writers have compared the lonely buttes, boulder-strewn canyons and fractured table lands to the biblical wilderness where Christ went to renounce worldly temptations.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | MICHAEL HIRSH, Associated Press
In the flower garden in front of Dr. Donald P. Vrabec's house is a large lump of coal, a conversation piece that sometimes puzzles visitors. "From time to time, people will think this is pretty unsightly and say, 'Don, why don't you get that ugly lump of coal out of your flower bed?' And I'll say to them, 'I think it's beautiful,' or else, simply, 'It's a reminder,' " Vrabec said.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coal-futures trading opened for the first time Thursday on the New York Mercantile Exchange, in what some took as a positive sign for the homely commodity that remains the nation's biggest energy source. A modest volume of 98 contracts was traded for low-sulfur Appalachian coal, but market players said it was a good start for a contract that Nymex has had in the works for nearly three years.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2005 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, the environmentalist, hates the pollution caused when coal is burned to make electricity. But Schwarzenegger, the businessman, likes the low-cost, plentiful electrons produced by coal-fired generators from Wyoming to Nevada. Over the last year, the governor has enthusiastically embraced both positions, issuing seemingly contradictory executive decrees, legal agreements and statements.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Services, Reuters
Investors embraced the latest stock offering from the buzzing energy sector, pushing the shares of Peabody Energy Corp. (ticker symbol: BTU), one of the world's largest coal companies, 31% higher in their debut Tuesday. Against a backdrop of soaring coal prices and a broader market rally, Peabody Energy's shares closed at $36.80 on the New York Stock Exchange, after a larger-than-expected $420-million initial public offering. The stock, one of the most active on the NYSE with 10.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1992 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As one lawyer for the Natural Resources Defense Council put it, the irony is "glaring and painful." Today, Earth Day 1992, out-of-state coal interests will be here to urge the California Energy Commission to ignore pollution created by energy-generation methods in other states that export electricity to California. Environmental groups will be urging the opposite. "California . . .
NEWS
July 11, 2004 | Ted Anthony, Associated Press Writer
Before the little building rose, everything was simpler. Outsiders pretty much stayed out. Insiders traded with each other. Miners mined coal. Desert winds blew, nomads wandered, lonely lakes froze and thawed, and the town called Wuhai went about its business. Which wasn't very much business at all. Sixteen hours from Beijing -- and that was by train. A car trip through Inner Mongolia's grasslands and cracked desert could be even longer.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through the valleys and hollows and along the creeks and wandering country roads, the little mining towns of Appalachia huddle in weary isolation, as if waiting for a thankful nation once again to embrace the power of coal. For more than 100 years, the thick coal-laden seams that reach back into the wooded hills have sustained the men of these coal camps who, like their fathers and grandfathers before them, disappeared each day into the bowels of the earth.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|