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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities seized a Taiwanese fishing vessel and arrested 85 illegal immigrants from China on Tuesday, cracking a criminal operation they believe is part of a burgeoning seagoing smuggling industry that has surfaced in the past six months. Since August, federal agents have uncovered four such immigrant-smuggling operations--two in the Los Angeles area and two in Honolulu.
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NEWS
October 29, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER
Frank Schubert, 74, is the last civilian lighthouse keeper in America. "I'm a relic," laughed Schubert, a tall, husky man who rapidly climbed the 78 steps of the circular iron stairway leading to the top of the narrow 75-foot-high Coney Island Light. The century-old lighthouse overlooks the entrance to New York bay at the southern tip of Brooklyn. It is located just down the street from the parachute jump at the famous amusement park and not far from Nathan's Coney Island hot dog stand.
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The captain and mooring master of the American Trader, which spilled 394,000 gallons of oil into Orange County coastal waters on Feb. 7, were foolish to depend on 15-year-old charts for the area and bear most of the responsibility for the spill even if the charts they were using prove to be flawed, lawyers and shipping experts said Thursday.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | RICHARD BEENE
The highest fine that can be levied against the firm determined to be responsible for the rupture of an oil tanker off the California coast is $250,000, officials said Friday. Cmdr. Scott Porter, a Coast Guard spokesman in Long Beach, said the Environmental Protection Agency would impose the fine only if the Coast Guard's maximum penalty--$5,000--is considered inadequate, "taking into account the magnitude of the spill." "I think we have to assume that ($5,000) isn't much for a major company. .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a break from the nation's war on terrorism, Coast Guard officials and government dignitaries gathered Friday at Newport Harbor to commission the Narwhal, a state-of-the-art cutter that has been on constant patrol since Sept. 11. "The Coast Guard is on the front line as never before," said Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach), who spoke at the commissioning ceremony. "Your task is formidable. I want to thank the crew for its commitment to national security."
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Celebrated in song and literature from Shakespeare to Mark Twain, the drunken sailor is a figure as venerable as seafaring itself. In "Moby Dick," Herman Melville inserted a victuals list for a whaling voyage that included "550 ankers of Geneva (gin) and 10,800 barrels of beer" and marveled that harpooners "so fuddled" with drink could "stand up in a boat's head and take good aim of flying whales . . . and hit them, too." But drink and the sea are not mixing as well for modern sailors.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Coast Guard sent the first batch of veterans' discharge papers Friday to a dozen former sailors in the World War II Merchant Marine, marking a final rite of passage for a group that has struggled four decades for recognition. Since the Defense Department yielded to judicial pressure in January and granted veterans' status to the wartime merchant sailors, the Coast Guard has been deluged with more than 20,000 applications from seamen seeking certification.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned by high rates of safety violations aboard charter boats in other parts of the nation, the U.S. Coast Guard has launched a voluntary program to inspect hundreds of small commercial craft in Southern California. The effort is directed at sportfishing vessels, powerboats and sailboats that carry no more than six paying passengers--craft that must comply with a variety of federal safety regulations but are not required to be inspected.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
The Coast Guard said it seized a 55-foot fishing boat off the coast of San Diego on Wednesday after finding less than an ounce of marijuana and a small amount of what appeared to be methamphetamine aboard the vessel. The boat, the Maria Elena, was in international waters 75 miles west of San Diego when Coast Guard personnel boarded it about 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, according to Charles Embleton, a Coast Guard spokesman in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ship caught the U.S. Coast Guard's eye the minute it sailed into Long Beach Harbor last week. But when its inspectors boarded the vessel, what they found virtually defied belief. "This is the worst ship I've seen in my 14-year career," said Lt. Cmdr. Joe LoSciuto, acting chief of inspections at the Coast Guard station in Long Beach. "I wouldn't sail on her." It's easy to see why. On the ship's bridge, the compass and the backup radar didn't work. Neither did the depth finder.
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