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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2002 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired from the U.S. Coast Guard for a decade, Mike Dobbins had worked as a police officer and even started a charter boat company in Old Harbor, Alaska. Then came Sept. 11. "I was on the phone [with the Coast Guard] in Washington, D.C. that day," Dobbins recalled. "I made it known that all they had to do was ask, and I'd come back."
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NEWS
April 13, 2002 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four miles out in the Atlantic Ocean, 6-foot waves are hammering the pilot boat, slathering its windshield in foam and rocking it like a roller coaster car. Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeremy Zimmer of the U.S. Coast Guard is about to go to work, stepping into the unknown with only a pistol to protect himself. The launch draws alongside Stena Clipper, a freighter arriving from the Dominican Republic. A rope ladder dangles down 25 feet to the sea from an open hatch in the rusting hull.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a break from the nation's war on terrorism, Coast Guard officials and government dignitaries gathered in Newport Harbor on Friday to commission the Narwhal, a new, state-of-the-art cutter that has been on constant patrol since Sept. 11. "The Coast Guard is on the front line as never before," said Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach), who spoke at the commissioning ceremony. "Your task is formidable. I want to thank the crew for its commitment to national security."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a break from the nation's war on terrorism, Coast Guard officials and government dignitaries gathered Friday at Newport Harbor to commission the Narwhal, a state-of-the-art cutter that has been on constant patrol since Sept. 11. "The Coast Guard is on the front line as never before," said Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach), who spoke at the commissioning ceremony. "Your task is formidable. I want to thank the crew for its commitment to national security."
BUSINESS
July 5, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tired of its image as a "second-class navy" outgunned by smugglers and stuck in the technological stone age, the Coast Guard hopes to spend more than $10 billion over the next 20 years to replace its fleet of aging ships, aircraft and communications systems. The service wants to modernize a fleet whose fastest cutters strain to hit 33 mph, vainly trying to keep up with 70-mph drug boats zipping across the ocean. Its troops rely on eyesight to search for troubled vessels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned by high rates of safety violations aboard charter boats in other parts of the nation, the U.S. Coast Guard has launched a voluntary program to inspect hundreds of small commercial craft in Southern California. The effort is directed at sportfishing vessels, powerboats and sailboats that carry no more than six paying passengers--craft that must comply with a variety of federal safety regulations but are not required to be inspected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | THUY-DOAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As retirements go, the Point Stuart's will be a short one. The Newport Harbor-based Coast Guard cutter will be formally taken out of service today, sandblasted, repainted a neutral white and handed over to the Salvadoran navy, which will put the 82-foot Point Stuart right back to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | THUY-DOAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As retirements go, the Point Stuart's will be a short one. The Newport Harbor-based Coast Guard cutter will be formally taken out of service today, sandblasted, repainted a neutral white and handed over to the El Salvadoran navy, which will put the 82-foot Point Stuart right back to work.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | Associated Press
A Coast Guard boat capsized on the Niagara River along the U.S.-Canada border and two of the four crewmen died Saturday after floating for hours in the icy water. The 21-foot boat was found floating bow up along the shore of Lake Ontario about a mile east of the mouth of the river, and the crewmen were rescued soon after midnight a couple of miles away, said Chief Petty Officer Adam Wine at the Coast Guard's Buffalo station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Coast Guard continued an ocean and aerial search Tuesday for a life raft belonging to an unidentified boat that reportedly sank near Santa Catalina Island. The Coast Guard has not found a sunken vessel or the raft, and it does not know how many people--if any--are missing, said Lt. Hector Cintron. The Coast Guard responded Monday night to a mayday call and a flare launched off the coast of Catalina. The first mayday call came in about 7:20 p.m.
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