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Coastal Areas California

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NEWS
June 19, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move heralded by environmentalists, President Bush on Thursday pledged to create an ocean sanctuary that virtually guarantees one-quarter of California's coastline permanent protection from offshore oil and gas drilling. The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, which will encompass an area bigger than the state of Connecticut, stretches from San Francisco Bay south to San Simeon Creek in San Luis Obispo County.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Jason Dante passed up a chance to catch a lobster. He bagged a corroded car battery instead, lugging it ashore in his net. Another scuba diver snagged what appeared to be a Santeria offering tossed with a prayer, or a curse, into the ocean: a sealed bottle with a brownish mixture of seeds and a photograph of a man, ripped in half. Others pulled tangles of fishing gear, plastic bags, Frisbees, cans, bottles, dingy socks, plastic six-pack holders and a surprising number of panties.
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NEWS
January 23, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California cities and counties may owe their employees as much as $2 billion for unpaid overtime work, under a ruling the Supreme Court let stand Tuesday. Los Angeles County officials said the ruling affects 23,000 of its 78,000 full-time employees and could cost the county $170 million. The decision covers all public employees who may have been considered exempt from overtime pay but whose wages can be docked if they miss a few hours of work.
NEWS
September 5, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lawmakers launched an eleventh-hour attempt Tuesday to thwart Hearst Corp. from subdividing some of California's most renowned coastal property as a prelude to opening it up to extensive development. Proponents of the bill hope it will not only protect the sweeping tablelands below Hearst Castle on the Central Coast but also curb an increasingly popular tactic of using historic property records to circumvent zoning restrictions and increase land values.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Exxon and Santa Barbara County officials announced Wednesday that they have reached an agreement to clear the way for the largest American offshore oil and gas development outside of Alaska's Beaufort Sea. Known as the Santa Ynez Unit, the $2.5-billion to $3-billion project covers 91,000 acres in federal waters seven to nine miles off Point Conception on the Santa Barbara County coast.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The seascape along the Santa Barbara Channel has been colored for decades by surfers, pelicans, freighters and offshore oil drilling platforms. Four of the oil rigs are nicknamed Heidi, Hope, Hazel and Hilda. These Erector-set-like hunks of metal stand 80 feet above the water, weigh 6 million pounds and together have pumped up 63 million barrels of crude oil for Chevron. And by August, they should be gone.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | DAVID REYES and ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Responding to a growing trend among local governments to limit beach access through curfews, parking lot closures and other means, the California Coastal Commission has issued a warning that such curfews are illegal without commission approval. In a letter sent to 73 cities and counties situated on the state's 1,100-mile coastline, the commission also indicated that it will not approve any long-term closures.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vegetable farmers John Lewallen and his wife, Eleanor, harvest their crops in the intertidal waters of the Pacific Ocean at a picturesque, remote cove studded with rock outcroppings. Their briny farm yields wild sea vegetables--seaweed--handpicked in hard-to-reach coves and bays along a 40-mile stretch of rugged Northern California coast.
NEWS
April 18, 1988
Sea urchins dwelling within 800 feet of a sunken freighter loaded with copper have concentrations of the mineral 100 times higher than those living five miles away, a scientist reported. Stanley V. Margolis, a UC Davis geology professor, said his findings are insufficient to raise concerns about copper contamination of marine life off the California coast after the sinking of the Pac Baroness, which went down off the Central Coast with 23,000 tons of powdered copper last September.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, Times Staff Writer
Declaring that California has escaped a disastrous oil spill only because of "sheer blind luck," two state officials proposed legislation Tuesday that would impose a 50-cent-per-barrel fee on oil to pay for spill cleanups. Lt. Gov. Leo T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has moved to appeal a U.S. District Court judge's ruling that effectively halted new oil drilling off the California coast by requiring the state's Coastal Commission to review any new exploration proposals. A spokeswoman for the Department of Interior's Minerals Management Service downplayed papers filed late Friday with the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, saying a final decision to appeal has yet to be made by the U.S. solicitor general.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | JOHN JOHNSON and KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It took a Las Vegas land speculator with an eye for California's coastline to recognize the value of an arcane legal document known as a certificate of compliance. Applying for these certificates, a legal mechanism to grandfather in ancient underlying parcels, has long been used by developers to subdivide their property outside of the usual local planning process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of the Santa Monica Bay could soon be designated a marine conservation area. Large sections of ocean encircling Catalina would be off limits to fishing. So would coastal waters off Carpinteria, Leo Carrillo Beach, Palos Verdes Peninsula, Laguna Beach, Dana Point, Camp Pendleton and La Jolla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration Monday threw its support behind setting aside vast swaths of ocean--including the waters around the Channel Islands off the Ventura County and Santa Barbara County coastline--as marine protected areas off-limits to fishing and other activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2001 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing under public ownership one of the most significant swaths of undeveloped coastline in Southern California, a nonprofit land trust said Wednesday that it has signed an agreement to purchase 2,500 acres of the sprawling El Capitan Ranch just west of Santa Barbara. The ranch is home to a range of plants and animals. One of the key elements of the sale, said the buyer, the nonprofit Trust for Public Land, is that the ranch will link El Capitan State Beach to the Los Padres National Forest.
NEWS
May 15, 2001 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Between the edge of land and the beginning of the sea lies a place like no other on Earth. In the narrow band where surf and turf collide, you can walk across several distinct zones of life in just a few footsteps. In a span of inches and days, evolution unfolds and life-and-death dramas play out between prey and predator. Intertidal zones are among the Earth's richest and most dynamic ecosystems. Yet they also are among its most vulnerable.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | JANET WILSON and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Adding fuel to the fierce debate about oil drilling off California's coast, U.S. Coast Guard laboratory tests have concluded that tar balls found on an Orange County beach in June probably came from a massive offshore oil-drilling complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1999 | MATT SURMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For members of Coastwalk, time is something other people worry about. On the beach, with the wind at their back, the sand at their feet and miles of breakers stretching along the shore, the rest of the world is free to breeze by. "You amble and you talk, and then you stop to look at something," said Mary Jane Dean, who came down from Northern California to walk nearly every mile of Ventura County's coast for the utopian dream of bringing the shoreline back to the people.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Sacramento Superior Court judge has ruled that the California Coastal Commission is unconstitutional in the way it is set up, a decision that could significantly weaken the agency empowered nearly 30 years ago to protect the state's most precious resource. The case grows out of the commission's efforts to stop a nonprofit group from completing construction of an artificial reef off Newport Beach.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis on Wednesday announced $10 million in grants to combat erosion of sand on beaches from San Francisco to San Diego. Some of the money will pay for immediate sand replenishment, but much will be used to study natural replenishment processes, with the goal of decreasing constant, costly sand replacement projects. "California's beaches are a valuable ecological, economic and recreational resource," Davis said in a statement.
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