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WORLD
February 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombian rebels killed at least seven police officers in their first serious attack against workers ripping out coca plants in Macarena National Park, police said. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, fired a mortar shell at police officers guarding the workers and followed up with fire from assault rifles, an officer said. Hundreds of workers were sent last month to remove the source of cocaine from the park.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Despite a diverse range of topics -- Mexican food, the coca plant, the world's most complicated watch and the federal duck stamp art program -- the authors participating in Saturday's Festival of Books panel discussion "A Singular Passion" all described similar experiences when it came to writing an entire book on a single, seemingly niche topic. Among them were the "a ha" moments when it first became apparent that the topic they were researching, writing or talking about deserved a deeper treatment.
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NEWS
February 20, 1990 | MICHAEL ISIKOFF, THE WASHINGTON POST
After years of despair over South America's burgeoning coca crop, the Bush Administration is studying a new option in the Latin drug war: unleashing swarms of tiny insects into the jungles of Peru and Bolivia to devour the shrubs that are the raw material for cocaine. At the urging of national drug control director William J. Bennett, the Administration recently more than quadrupled, to $6.
SCIENCE
December 27, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Cocaine repels most insects -- which is why the coca plant makes the chemical in the first place. But in a surprising new finding, U.S. and Australian researchers reported Friday that honeybees are susceptible to the drug's insidious lure. They become addicted, and even suffer withdrawal symptoms when they no longer have access.
WORLD
June 8, 2003 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in at least a decade, the amount of coca grown in Colombia is falling sharply, largely the result of an aggressive, U.S.-backed aerial fumigation campaign. Repeated spraying by crop-dusters plus government programs to encourage farmers to pull up coca plants have reduced Colombia's coca, the source of cocaine, by 38% to 252,000 acres in the past three years, according to a United Nations study released this year.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | RUTH MORRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Ilia Garcia signed up for a U.S.-backed program to eradicate her coca bushes eight months ago, she thought Uncle Sam had answered her prayers for a better life. She promised to uproot all her coca shrubs, the raw material used to make cocaine, in return for a government gift of two healthy cows. The cows haven't arrived. Nor have the fertilizer and pigs promised to her neighbors. Then, last month, U.S.
WORLD
October 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Ambassador William B. Wood urged Colombia to spray weedkiller in the country's nature parks to destroy coca, the plant from which cocaine is derived. He said the chemicals would not cause widespread damage to the reserves' ecosystems. Harried by eradication campaigns elsewhere, drug traffickers have in recent years streamed into the parks, where spraying is banned. There, they have torn down thousands of acres of virgin rainforest to plant coca.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Despite a diverse range of topics -- Mexican food, the coca plant, the world's most complicated watch and the federal duck stamp art program -- the authors participating in Saturday's Festival of Books panel discussion "A Singular Passion" all described similar experiences when it came to writing an entire book on a single, seemingly niche topic. Among them were the "a ha" moments when it first became apparent that the topic they were researching, writing or talking about deserved a deeper treatment.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Valentin Quispe, an old Indian soothsayer in a blue knit cap and a green corduroy jacket, studied a scattering of coca leaves on the wool cloth at his knees and told a client, a young man, that his marriage was in trouble. "You and your woman may separate," Quispe said. "You have problems. Fight too much." The young man asked if there was another woman in his future. Quispe scattered some more coca leaves and paused. "Yes," he answered. "You will have luck with the other woman."
WORLD
January 20, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombia sent more than 900 workers with shovels into a nature reserve to destroy coca plants grown by Marxist rebels. Police say the eradication campaign is aimed mainly at restoring the Macarena National Park's ecosystem. But President Alvaro Uribe would also like to rob the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, of cocaine sales, one of its main sources of revenue. He ordered the eradication after guerrillas killed 29 soldiers in the area last month.
WORLD
June 19, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Colombian peasants devoted about 27% more land to growing coca last year, the United Nations reported Wednesday, calling the increase a surprise given the intense efforts to eradicate cocaine's raw ingredient. Estimated cocaine production, however, increased only slightly in Colombia and other Andean nations as cultivation shifted to smaller, less productive plots in more remote locations. About 1,096 tons was produced in 2007, compared with 1,085 tons the year before, according to the U.N.
WORLD
February 25, 2008 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Nature photographer Aldo Brando saw a horrible beauty in the destruction visited upon Colombia's national parks by outlaw coca growers. As his helicopter slalomed through a dozen sky-high columns of smoke from fires set by poachers clearing Macarena National Park, Brando saw endless "craters" of lime-green coca. He likened the park's once unbroken carpet of dark green primeval forest, now scarred by roads, fires and illegal chemicals, to "the black-and-white palette of war."
WORLD
June 5, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Despite widespread spraying of defoliants financed by the U.S., total acreage of coca cultivated in Colombia rose 19% in 2006 compared with 2005, according to an annual survey by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. The report stresses that much of the gain may be attributed to an expansion of the area included in the survey, which is done by satellite, airplane and on the ground.
WORLD
February 7, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombian rebels killed at least seven police officers in their first serious attack against workers ripping out coca plants in Macarena National Park, police said. The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, fired a mortar shell at police officers guarding the workers and followed up with fire from assault rifles, an officer said. Hundreds of workers were sent last month to remove the source of cocaine from the park.
WORLD
January 20, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombia sent more than 900 workers with shovels into a nature reserve to destroy coca plants grown by Marxist rebels. Police say the eradication campaign is aimed mainly at restoring the Macarena National Park's ecosystem. But President Alvaro Uribe would also like to rob the leftist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, of cocaine sales, one of its main sources of revenue. He ordered the eradication after guerrillas killed 29 soldiers in the area last month.
WORLD
October 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. Ambassador William B. Wood urged Colombia to spray weedkiller in the country's nature parks to destroy coca, the plant from which cocaine is derived. He said the chemicals would not cause widespread damage to the reserves' ecosystems. Harried by eradication campaigns elsewhere, drug traffickers have in recent years streamed into the parks, where spraying is banned. There, they have torn down thousands of acres of virgin rainforest to plant coca.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Reuters
President Alan Garcia on Friday called on the United States to funnel billions of dollars to Peruvian peasants to encourage them to replace coca, the raw material for cocaine, with other crops as a way of curbing the drug trade. Saying Washington's anti-drug efforts were misguided, Garcia said the United States should invest in Peruvian agriculture and give seeds and fertilizers to induce farmers to switch from coca to coffee and other crops. "I propose the U.S.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justo Silva, the manager of a huge farmers' cooperative in Peru, wanted to tell the drug summit here Thursday how coca production can be stopped. But no one at the summit would listen, he said. Silva, 45, was invited to the summit by President Alan Garcia of Peru. He was taken to the meeting site with a credential saying he was a member of Peru's technical delegation. He had hoped to participate at least in technical meetings, he told reporters.
WORLD
January 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Peru, the world's No. 2 cocaine producer, said the amount of Peruvian land devoted to growing coca -- the drug's raw material -- was at its lowest in 20 years. A surge in voluntary eradication in the last quarter of 2003 helped Peru scrap 27,965 acres of illegal coca crop last year, said Nils Ericsson, the country's anti-drug chief. "With that reduction, the total amount of coca areas is [77,000 acres], the lowest in the last 20 years," he said.
WORLD
June 8, 2003 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in at least a decade, the amount of coca grown in Colombia is falling sharply, largely the result of an aggressive, U.S.-backed aerial fumigation campaign. Repeated spraying by crop-dusters plus government programs to encourage farmers to pull up coca plants have reduced Colombia's coca, the source of cocaine, by 38% to 252,000 acres in the past three years, according to a United Nations study released this year.
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