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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Dick Van Dyke's most popular movie role is that of Bert, the Cockney jack-of-all-trades and best bud with the practically perfect nanny ( Julie Andrews) in Walt Disney's beloved 1964 musical " Mary Poppins. " It was Van Dyke who introduced the Oscar-winning best song "Chim Chim Cher-ee" by Richard and Robert Sherman. But Van Dyke is quick to point out that the "British people have never left me off the hook" about his less-than-picture-perfect Cockney accent. "They just tease me to death," he says, laughing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Robert Abele
You don't call a movie "Cockneys vs. Zombies" because you yearn for cinematic subtlety. Matthias Hoene's feature film debut is the umpteenth infection in the undead epidemic rampaging through pop culture. And it's all that the title implies: brash East Enders gone Mum and Dad over a right goppin' bunch of flesh-eatin' nutters, whose Khybers need kickin', mind you! You don't need a cockney rhyming slang dictionary, however, to grasp that young bank robbers Andy (Harry Treadaway), Terry (Rasmus Hardiker)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2011
None but the Lonely Heart Grant returned to his British roots in this 1944 drama, earning an Oscar nomination as a Cockney wastrel who returns home to his mother (Ethel Barrymore). Bringing Up Baby The actor is at his madcap best as a mild-mannered paleontologist who encounters Katharine Hepburn's ditzy socialite in Howard Hawks' 1938 screwball classic. Charade Grant and Audrey Hepburn teamed up for the first and only time for Stanley Donen's funny, sophisticated romantic 1963 thriller set in Paris about a widow and a mysterious man who comes to her rescue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2011
None but the Lonely Heart Grant returned to his British roots in this 1944 drama, earning an Oscar nomination as a Cockney wastrel who returns home to his mother (Ethel Barrymore). Bringing Up Baby The actor is at his madcap best as a mild-mannered paleontologist who encounters Katharine Hepburn's ditzy socialite in Howard Hawks' 1938 screwball classic. Charade Grant and Audrey Hepburn teamed up for the first and only time for Stanley Donen's funny, sophisticated romantic 1963 thriller set in Paris about a widow and a mysterious man who comes to her rescue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
From the vault of ancient musicals steps "Me and My Girl," rouged and winking and doing the Lambeth Walk. They don't write them like this anymore. It is difficult to believe they ever did. One would have to be English to explain the success of this 1937 revival, which has been running in the West End for more than a year and which is said to be heading for Broadway after it finishes its engagement for Civic Light Opera at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
George Bernard Shaw was one of the wordiest playwrights to ever put dialogue on paper. Theatre Guild founder Lawrence Langner once told the playwright that his plays could never be done properly until Shaw was dead and the plays could be cut. That theory is somewhat borne out by an affectionate revival of "Pygmalion" on the Long Beach Playhouse's Mainstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Those bad boys standing outside the disco, the bar, the nightclub, Dante's hell, flexing their biceps, snarling and frowning for bait, have brand new faces at the Tiffany these days. But everything else is the same: same lowlife types in tuxedos, ready to toss those troublemakers through the door--assuming they've allowed them in to begin with. Same regimented glower at punkish British toughs. A second look at John Godber's "Bouncers" brings no major surprises.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1986 | ELISABETH GRAHAM
Golden West College has produced a spectacularly turned out "My Fair Lady," but it's a production that, although pleasing to the eye, offers little for the mind or heart. The lack of vitality here is especially disappointing because it's obvious that director William Purkiss wanted to put some new stripes on the venerable Alan Jay Lerner/Frederick Loewe adaptation of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON, Times Art Critic
The young writer who hadn't written much snuggled in the covers against the chill London morning. He dreamt something profound but the radio in the servants' quarters next door woke him to the tune of "White Cliffs of Dover." It was 1960 but the radio was tuned to 1942.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1986 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Five weeks to go. Down in the costume shop, chorus girls are being fitted for elegant '30s ball gowns. A few floors up, two dozen tap dancers practice racing forward at the end of a number without trampling one another. And when a bird flies in an open window, the director calls it a spy for producer David Merrick. There's nothing low-key about "Me and My Girl," a boisterous, old-fashioned Broadway-style musical with a big budget, big cast and big production numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Dick Van Dyke's most popular movie role is that of Bert, the Cockney jack-of-all-trades and best bud with the practically perfect nanny ( Julie Andrews) in Walt Disney's beloved 1964 musical " Mary Poppins. " It was Van Dyke who introduced the Oscar-winning best song "Chim Chim Cher-ee" by Richard and Robert Sherman. But Van Dyke is quick to point out that the "British people have never left me off the hook" about his less-than-picture-perfect Cockney accent. "They just tease me to death," he says, laughing.
NEWS
July 7, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The East End's Eliza Doolittles have long since moved away--not to rural Hertford, Hereford and Hampshire, mind you, but to suburban Essex and Kent, where their cockney rhyming slang is hardly heard. The street markets they abandoned in the gritty neighborhoods of Spitalfields and Whitechapel are Bangladeshi now. And the cockneys' favorite pie-and-mash shops are outnumbered by tandoori restaurants and trendy cafes that serve arugula salad to City of London slickers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2001 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a regular contributor to Calendar
More than 40 years after it first opened here, "My Fair Lady" is once again the talk of theater land. It seemed impossible that any new production could emulate the excitement of the 1956 original, which arrived in London in 1958, starring England's Julie Andrews as Eliza Doolittle, the Cockney flower girl coached by Professor Henry Higgins (Rex Harrison) to modify her vowel sounds and pass herself off as a society lady. Yet it has happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
George Bernard Shaw was one of the wordiest playwrights to ever put dialogue on paper. Theatre Guild founder Lawrence Langner once told the playwright that his plays could never be done properly until Shaw was dead and the plays could be cut. That theory is somewhat borne out by an affectionate revival of "Pygmalion" on the Long Beach Playhouse's Mainstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1993 | JOE RHODES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Except for the eyes--still startlingly wide and innocent--you might not recognize her. Leslie Hornsby Lawson is 20 pounds heavier than when she was the most famous girl in the world. Her hair is considerably longer, her working-class accent slightly less pronounced. But her friends still call her Twiggy, the nickname she's had since she was 15. It was kind of an insult when first bestowed, a not-so-subtle knock at her stick-figure frame. Until it made her famous, she hated her look.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1992 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Years ago, after "Alfie" had made him a star, Michael Caine remarked that until then an actor with a heavy dose of cockney in his speech would be lucky to land a bit part in which he tugged his forelock and said to the arresting officer, "It's a fair pinch, guv; I'll go quiet." Actually, the challenge back in the mid-'60s might have been to find a professional actor who spoke BBC English regularly but could do a cockney accent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Opera Pacific's "My Fair Lady" at the Orange County Performing Arts Center is casual, ambling, refined: With its restrained sensibilities, this production is more interested in elegance than earthiness. Friday's opening night required a dose of patience from those expecting to see fur flying between Eliza Doolittle and Prof. Henry Higgins as soon as she lets loose her first caterwauled Cockney vowel. The show started slowly--very slowly--lacking an amplification of character or scene.
NEWS
January 9, 1985 | RICHARD EDER, Times Book Critic
The Laughter of Carthage by Michael Moorcock (Random House: $19.95) Like Harry Flashman, Michael Moorcock's Col. Pyat skids cater-cornered across large historical events, full of single purposes and misapprehensions. Like Flashman, he is boastful, crooked, an intercontinental Lothario, a bungling harebrain borne along by disasters, and a dreadful liar. But where Flashman swoops and darts with a swallow-like insouciance, Pyat flaps along like an overloaded pelican.
NEWS
December 27, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
According to Angela Lansbury, people are always asking her to name the one that got away: the role she always wanted to do but never got the opportunity. Her answer to them is always the same: "There isn't any," said Lansbury, her blue eyes twinkling. "With me, it's always, what's the next role that is going to come in the mail or that somebody is going to tell me about and I am going to fall in love with.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | SUE LEEMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The chirp of the Cockney is still heard in the heart of London, but it is getting fainter, fainter and ever more fainter. "As London changes, so the Cockney is vanishing," says octogenarian Cockney Bill Springle, born in the "square mile" of the city of London, the traditional Cockney heartland. "Favorite haunts and places of interest are disappearing, bulldozed in the name of progress." Fellow Cockney Dennis Lincoln puts it more bluntly: "The Cockney community doesn't exist no more."
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