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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By John Horn
CBS Films has released a new trailer for  "Inside Llewyn Davis," the Ethan and Joel Coen story of a struggling folk musician that is due in theaters Dec. 6 following its successful world premiere in May's Cannes Film Festival. The movie is set in New York's Greenwich Village in 1961, just before the arrival of Bob Dylan. Oscar Isaac plays Davis, and the film follows him on a one-week journey that Times film critic Kenneth Turan said “is both haunting and ever so bleakly funny.” PHOTOS: The scene at Cannes Film Festival 2013 The new trailer makes it clear that the film, as with all the Coen Brothers'  works, has a distinct look and pace.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The Coen brothers' 1996 comedy-noir masterpiece "Fargo" wasn't so much a movie as it was a cultural event - you remember where you were when you first saw it. That endless yet claustrophobic snow scape, the anxious narcissism of William H. Macy's scheming car salesman, the glory of Frances McDormand's pregnant police chief Marge. It blew out the wall between hilarity and horror to prove that both dwell in the same landscape. It showed that senseless violence was simply one more item on the spectrum of human behavior, alongside love and honor and courage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Noel Murray
A Serious Man Universal, $29.98; Blu-ray, $36.98 Typically strange and unusually sweet, "A Serious Man" finds Joel and Ethan Coen contemplating the mysteries of the universe and the meaning of good and evil before deciding that spiritual inquiry is a stupid waste of time. Michael Stuhlbarg gives an engaging performance as a Jewish physics professor wandering through the increasingly vague moral landscape of late-'60s suburban Minnesota, looking for answers from a God who responds with easily misinterpreted signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Reed Johnson
When Nelson Lopéz was preparing the first bilingual translation of "Tales of Clay," a landmark short-story collection by the legendary Salvadoran writer known as Salarrué, he turned for inspiration to some unlikely sources: Mark Twain and the Coen brothers. First published in 1933, the three dozen stories in "Tales of Clay" evoke the harsh lives and slangy rural idiom of El Salvador's indigenous peasants. Their author, Salvador Efraín Salazar Arrué, a.k.a. Salarrué (pronounced sal-ru-ay)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
The Coen brothers and their longtime music supervisor T Bone Burnett are producing a concert inspired by "Inside Llewyn Davis," their upcoming film set in the 1960s Greenwich Village folk music scene. The show, which is set for New York City's Town Hall on Sept. 29, will feature musical acts including Joan Baez, Marcus Mumford, Patti Smith and Jack White. Some of the film's cast, including Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan and John Goodman, will also perform in the concert, which is titled "Another Day, Another Time: Celebrating the Music of 'Inside Llewyn Davis.'" PHOTOS: Coen brothers: Movie mysteries revealed Based on Joel and Ethan Coens' original screenplay, "Inside Llewyn Davis" follows a week in the life of a struggling young folk singer (Isaac)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- The Gotham Awards handed their best feature award to a surprise contender Monday: the Coen brothers' folk-music tale "Inside Llewyn Davis. " "Fruitvale Station," the movie about an unarmed young man who was fatally shot at an Oakland train station in 2009, was also a big winner at the annual New York independent-film confab, with the film's Ryan Coogler and Michael B. Jordan winning breakthrough director and breakthrough actor, respectively. Matthew McConaughey won the ceremony's first-ever best actor prize for his role as unlikely AIDS crusader Ron Woodroof in "The Dallas Buyers Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Reed Johnson
When Nelson Lopéz was preparing the first bilingual translation of "Tales of Clay," a landmark short-story collection by the legendary Salvadoran writer known as Salarrué, he turned for inspiration to some unlikely sources: Mark Twain and the Coen brothers. First published in 1933, the three dozen stories in "Tales of Clay" evoke the harsh lives and slangy rural idiom of El Salvador's indigenous peasants. Their author, Salvador Efraín Salazar Arrué, a.k.a. Salarrué (pronounced sal-ru-ay)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009
Regarding the one-note Coen Brothers ["Mystery in the Making," Oct. 4]: But, oh what a perfect note they keep hitting. America's national cinematic treasures. Perfect pitch, again, again and again. Jerry Collamer San Clemente
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
As much as any directors working today, the brothers Coen, Ethan and Joel, are unmistakable auteurs, filmmakers who place their own distinctive stamp on everything they do. But while the bleak, funny, exquisitely made "Inside Llewyn Davis" echoes familiar themes and narrative journeys, it also goes its own way and becomes a singular experience, one of their best films. Like the Coens' earlier "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," "Inside" sends a protagonist with links to Homer's Odyssey (here it's an ornery cat named Ulysses)
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On the set of his first movie, "Hedwig and the Angry Inch," future "Rabbit Hole" director John Cameron Mitchell was decked out in drag ? and running around the set barking orders at Teamsters. His father, then an Army major general, was visiting the set that day. "He told me, 'Oh, you're doing what I do,'" recalls Mitchell. On most sets, that's the truth: A director's vision may be one thing, but how he or she achieves it through managing cast, crew and a thousand other tiny details is another.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
A budding folk singer's struggle to connect with fans is at the heart of Joel and Ethan Coen's latest film, "Inside Llewyn Davis," their historically informed story of a musician trying to find his way in the Greenwich Village folk music scene circa 1961. Off the screen, however, Davis has already won some big fans in the music business who are delighted in those rare instances when music and musicians take the center stage on screen. "From our standpoint at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, we love movies like that because they really make people take a look at where the current music they listen to comes from," said Rock Hall of Fame Foundation President Joel Peresman.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
One of the most beguiling folk records of the year has the bonus of ferrying along a Joel and Ethan Coen plot line. The songs within the brothers' new "Inside Llewyn Davis" move from balladry to blues to ancient British folk, adding an extra layer of lyricism and revealing a portal to another storytelling realm. The selections and performances highlight a moment when a perfectly realized stanza sung honestly in a smoky cafe could produce an audible gasp, reverberate throughout New York's Greenwich Village and, with luck or if your name were Bob Dylan, American culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Amy Dawes
"It's fun to use my singing voice as part of a character," says pop superstar Justin Timberlake, describing how he toned down his vibrato and adjusted his guitar-strumming to portray clean-cut, early '60s folk singer Jim Berkey in the Coen brothers' "Inside Llewyn Davis. " One of the most delightful scenes in the movie, which opened Friday, involves a spirited recording session for a goofy novelty song called "Please Mr. Kennedy" - a plea to not be drafted into the space race. Jim sets the pace, instructing his musician buddy Llewyn (Oscar Isaac)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Joel and Ethan Coen's new folk-music tale "Inside Llewyn Davis" has struck a chord with critics - make that a few chords, plus a couple of verses for good measure. The film, which stars Oscar Isaac as a struggling folk singer in 1960s New York, has garnered near-unanimous positive reviews. The Times' own Kenneth Turan writes , "While the bleak, funny, exquisitely made 'Inside Llewyn Davis' echoes familiar themes and narrative journeys, it also goes its own way and becomes a singular experience, one of [the Coen brothers']
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Inside Llewyn Davis," the Coen brothers' latest movie, shines a light on the early-1960s Greenwich Village folk scene, focusing on a struggling folk singer (Oscar Isaac, a revelation) who can't get a handle on his career or personal life. T Bone Burnett supervised the music, as he did with the Coens' "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and has staged a handful of concerts featuring folk songs from the film's warm soundtrack. We spoke to Joel and Ethan Coen shortly after one such show in Santa Monica about their inspirations for the movie and what it might say to artists today.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
As much as any directors working today, the brothers Coen, Ethan and Joel, are unmistakable auteurs, filmmakers who place their own distinctive stamp on everything they do. But while the bleak, funny, exquisitely made "Inside Llewyn Davis" echoes familiar themes and narrative journeys, it also goes its own way and becomes a singular experience, one of their best films. Like the Coens' earlier "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," "Inside" sends a protagonist with links to Homer's Odyssey (here it's an ornery cat named Ulysses)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2008 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
Calling from, as one might well imagine, France, John Malkovich is measured, urbane and dryly witty. And yet, when Ethan and Joel Coen wrote him into their upcoming "Burn After Reading," it was as a burned-out former CIA analyst prone to fits of apoplectic rage. "Yeah, well, probably, people like to see me lose my temper, for whatever reason," Malkovich muses in his familiar, languid delivery. His character "has done this job, which I don't think has much impact on anything in a positive way. He has a miserable marriage, he's a drunk and he doesn't seem to have much to focus on except writing his sort of fictionalized biography or his attempt at achieving Tom Clancydom."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2001 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
What do the movie-making Coen brothers--the joyously ironic brains behind my favorite movie of 2000, "O Brother, Where Art Thou?"--have in common with Billy Wilder, Alfred Hitchcock, Luis Bunuel and Stanley Kubrick? Great movies on their filmographies? A mastery of dark comedy? Both true, but that's still only partly right. The directors above, who gave us--respectively--"Fargo," "Some Like It Hot," "Rear Window" 'Belle de Jour" and "Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- The Gotham Awards handed their best feature award to a surprise contender Monday: the Coen brothers' folk-music tale "Inside Llewyn Davis. " "Fruitvale Station," the movie about an unarmed young man who was fatally shot at an Oakland train station in 2009, was also a big winner at the annual New York independent-film confab, with the film's Ryan Coogler and Michael B. Jordan winning breakthrough director and breakthrough actor, respectively. Matthew McConaughey won the ceremony's first-ever best actor prize for his role as unlikely AIDS crusader Ron Woodroof in "The Dallas Buyers Club.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Michael Ordoña
The Coen brothers' new film, "Inside Llewyn Davis," covers one drain-circling week in the life of a marginally successful folk singer in 1961 New York City, inspired in part by the memoir of folk personality Dave Van Ronk. But to be clear, Llewyn Davis is not Bob Dylan. He's not Van Ronk. He's not even Oscar Isaac. "The description at the audition was, 'He is not Dylan. He is not the poet. He is a workman, a blue-collar guy from the boroughs.' So I latched on to that idea, the workman, and what that meant," says Isaac.
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