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Coffee Beans

FOOD
January 23, 1997 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was gridlock in the Wild Oats parking lot Saturday. Peet's Coffee and Tea, which has fueled a lot of late-night cramming up in Berkeley over the last 30 years, was about to open its first Southland store in Pasadena, and Cal alumni were invited to a pre-opening.
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FOOD
August 10, 1995 | DONNA DEANE, TIMES TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR
The best meals are those planned around the surprises you find at the market, whether it's a perfectly ripe tomato or, as I discovered on a recent shopping trip, boneless chicken legs. I found the chicken legs at Little Tokyo's Yaohan grocery store, where they come two to a package and are flattened ato resemble cutlets. What a great cut for a quick-cooking, inexpensive chicken piccata.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quiz for java junkies: A) What did 17th-Century Pope Clement VIII do after his first taste of coffee? B) Where and when did the world's first coffeehouse open? C) What's the meaning of the Arabic word qahwa , from which the word coffee was derived? Stumped? Then drain that cup and visit the Fullerton Museum Center, where "From Dancing Goats to Voltaire's Notes: The History, Geography and Technology of Coffee" opens today and runs through Aug. 27.
NEWS
March 7, 1995
Coffee, that ancient, aromatic morning jolt, is one of the world's most popular drinks, and a major industry in Brazil, the largest producer, and other countries of Central and South America, Africa and Asia. In the United States, which is the No. 1 importer and buys 25% of the world's annual crop, coffee companies have been given a boost in recent years by the boom in retail outlets such as Starbucks and their specialty brews. But these are not the best of times for growers of the humble bean.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The New Sobriety is being supplanted by the New Jumpiness. And coffeehouses, putting the jangle into jingle jangle, are springing up like junk stores, causing a new generation of young Americans on legal speed to talk fast, smoke more, play chess and twitch. Unlike the world on beer, the world on caffeine has no legal downside. DWI--driving while impetuous--is handled indifferently by the cops, who are themselves caffeine abusers.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1995 | From Reuters
Convincing a billion Chinese tea drinkers to set aside the habit of a few millennia in favor of a thick and bitter-tasting foreign brew called coffee was a challenge Stuart Eunson could not let pass. When the inveterate coffee drinker found himself stranded as a student in the country that cliches about tea were created for, Eunson, now 25, saw an immediate market. To exploit it, he and two like-minded friends this year established their own company, Arabica Roasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1994 | LOUISE YARNALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As customers stroll in to buy their morning coffee at Caffe Latte in the mid-Wilshire district, they are surrounded by images of Third World coffee plantations and European cafe society. Burlap sacks of raw, pale-green beans are piled by the door. A few steps from the cash register, coffee roaster James Marcotte dumps some beans into the funnel of a gleaming, steaming European-style roaster.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | HILARY DOLE KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 100 kinds of coffee are imported into the United States from around the world. The buyers, brokers and roasters who import and sell coffee beans taste, or as they call it, "cup," a lot of coffee. Slurping the coffee through the lips, swirling it around the mouth and spitting it out, they are able to discern and judge the subtle interplay among the sweet, sour, bitter and salt that, coupled with a distinctive aroma, comprise the taste of coffee.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | MAX JACOBSON, Max Jacobson is a free-lance writer who reviews restaurants weekly for The Times Orange County Edition.
Coffee tasting is definitely a fine art to its connoisseurs, many of whom claim to be able to distinguish the flavor of beans the way French wine tasters discern fine Bordeaux. I drink coffee regularly but can't claim that kind of palate sensitivity. Still, this not-so-random sampling of the brew at five leading Orange County coffeehouses yielded interesting results. Starbuck's is a rapidly expanding Seattle-based chain, specializing in fresh roasted whole-bean coffees sold in bulk.
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