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TRAVEL
July 6, 1986 | JUDITH MORGAN, Morgan, of La Jolla, is a nationally known magazine and newspaper writer
When I travel, I don't always go buy the book. I save newspaper clippings. I file magazine stories. I browse in libraries. I badger friends. Yet I do my part for the publishing industry. There are, perhaps, 600 slim to medium-thick travel books on the shelves beside my desk. These are just the more practical volumes. The bold and beautiful coffee-table books are in taller bookcases. I would no more put a coffee-table book on the coffee table than I would put a glove in a glove compartment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even at 100, Tarzan, the Lord of the Jungle, is still the ultimate swinger. Since Edgar Rice Burroughs' first tale, "Tarzan of the Apes," appeared in the popular All-Story magazine a century ago, the world's infatuation has never abated for the athletic, buff and educated man who lives in the jungles of Africa. Now Tarzan is the subject of a lavish coffee-table book, "Tarzan The Centennial Celebration," by Scott Tracy Griffin. The well-researched look at Burroughs and his creation features a forward by Ron Ely, who played Tarzan in the 1966-68 NBC series.
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TRAVEL
February 14, 2010 | By Christopher Reynolds
Chinese New Year is coming soon (on Western calendars, it's Sunday), but if you can't make it to the Middle Kingdom to marvel at fireworks, here's a quieter option. Check out "China" (Abbeville Press, 244 pages), a new, epic photo book that is to most coffee-table volumes what the Great Wall is to your backyard fence. Measuring nearly 12 by nearly 18 inches and contained within a sturdy slipcase, it features 238 images -- most by photographer Ming Tan -- and 12 gatefold panoramas.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Craig Nakano
What to do when you've got a beloved family coffee table that's just too small for your space? If you're designer Darryl Carter, you build a second table around it. In Carter's new "The Collected Home: Rooms With Style, Grace, and History," co-written with Trish Donnally and released Tuesday by Clarkson Potter, the designer recalls a client whose father had made a small table under the tutelage of the great George Nakashima. When the table was pulled out of storage, Carter says, it was clearly not the right scale for its intended new home.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2005 | Samantha Critchell, Associated Press
The fashion world loves petite things, skinny things, colorful things -- except when it comes to its books. Among the season's fashion-themed, coffee-table, gift-worthy books the trends are big, thick and black and white. The mammoth "Louis Vuitton" (Abrams, $125), by Paul-Gerard Pasols, features a monogrammed leather handle on the cover, inviting readers to pull open the lid on the luxury brand's 151-year history.
FOOD
January 14, 2009 | Russ Parsons
Judging from some of the most popular titles of the recent holiday season, you might think the only reason people bought cookbooks was to talk about them. Let's see, we had "Under Pressure," Thomas Keller's book on sous-vide cooking, which is probably quite remarkable if you have the $2,500 to invest in the equipment necessary to cook from it.
HOME & GARDEN
January 18, 1992 | VALERIE ORLEANS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No longer a mere slab of wood with four legs, coffee tables now come in all shapes and sizes. Ranging from glass to marble to inlaid woods, coffee tables have come a long way from being mere repositories for oversized books and family knickknacks. Indeed, some of the tables could almost be considered works of art. "Coffee tables have always been of interest to designers because they often become the focal point of a room," said designer Mary Swift of Swift Interiors in Laguna Hills.
NEWS
December 19, 1985
Gone are the days when the typical cookbook was splattered with grease and relegated to the kitchen. One of the trendiest new gifts this season is the oversized cookbook that costs $30 or more, with lush, full color photographs and pristine, glossy pages. And it sits, accompanied by other arty books and magazines, on the coffee table.
BOOKS
December 14, 1986 | SHARON DIRLAM, Dirlam is a Times staff writer.
In today's world, when the farthest corner seems near enough to visit sooner or later, travel books serve not only as material for the imagination, but as enlightenment about places we've been or plan to go.
NEWS
September 15, 1985 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
Tasha the freeze-dried Pekingese is perched on a laminated redwood burl coffee table. The dog has been dead two years, but he looks as if he's only napping. His coat is lustrous. His ears are slightly cocked. His pose is natural. Tasha's owner, Karen Nastasuk, has been harassed by friends and maligned by her family for holding onto her dog as a keepsake. But, she said, the dog was always such a comfort to her that she never considered consigning him to a pet cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
The best stories write themselves. That's what authors often say. And the disaster of the RMS Titanic in April 1912 is one of these, so rich in perspectives and human interest — the social classes aboard, the elegance and technology of the ship, the disaster and missed chances to avert it — that the story seems to unfold with all the doom and precision of a Greek tragedy. Michael Davie explores all the angles in his "Titanic: The Death and Life of a Legend" (Vintage), a 1986 book reissued for the centennial of the ship's sinking on its maiden voyage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2011
Art Nouveau Norbert Wolf Prestel, $75 The Art Nouveau movement covered it all - decorative arts, architecture, fashion, dance, advertising and more - and this book seeks to restore the movement's prominence in the discussion of modern art. The Art of the Adventures of Tintin Chris Guise Harper Design, $39.99 An exploration of how - using early concept drawings, models and final stills...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
"I want to be gay, I want to be free," the stunning young woman says, vivacious, casually amoral, all but blistering the screen. "Life is short and I want to live it while I'm alive. " The actress is Jean Harlow, and the bitter irony is that she lived only eight years past that moment of dialogue in Howard Hughes' legendary "Hell's Angels," dying of kidney failure at age 26 in 1937. Yet in that short span of time Hollywood's original platinum blond created an impressive body of work that is shockingly little seen today.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Bill Gold was just 21 and a recent graduate in illustration and design from the Pratt Institute in New York when he was hired in the advertising department of Warner Bros. in New York City. His first poster was for the 1942 classic " Casablanca. " Over the next 60 years, Gold was responsible for either designing or working with illustrators on about 2,000 motion pictures, including Elia Kazan's 1951 "A Streetcar Named Desire" and 1955's "East of Eden," Alfred Hitchcock's 1954 "Dial M for Murder," Stanley Kubrick's 1971 "A Clockwork Orange" and 1975's "Barry Lyndon," and 35 Clint Eastwood movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2010
Still searching for that perfect gift for your brother-in-law or a persnickety client? Coffee-table books might fit the bill, what with that suitable heft and an undeniable quotient of cool. Here we offer a few last-minute selections for those gaps on your list: Beginnings Anne Geddes Anne Geddes Publishing, $50 The Aussie photographer was contemplating a hiatus from her studio when she came across an exhibit of birds' nests. This unexpected encounter turned into the inspiration for her latest collection of baby photos, "Beginnings.
TRAVEL
February 14, 2010 | By Christopher Reynolds
Chinese New Year is coming soon (on Western calendars, it's Sunday), but if you can't make it to the Middle Kingdom to marvel at fireworks, here's a quieter option. Check out "China" (Abbeville Press, 244 pages), a new, epic photo book that is to most coffee-table volumes what the Great Wall is to your backyard fence. Measuring nearly 12 by nearly 18 inches and contained within a sturdy slipcase, it features 238 images -- most by photographer Ming Tan -- and 12 gatefold panoramas.
HOME & GARDEN
September 19, 2009 | David A. Keeps
Shhh. Not everything on the "Mad Men" set is genuine 1960s vintage Manhattan. The sofa, chairs and coffee table in Don Draper's office were made in Los Angeles by Futurama. Owner Jeffrey Perry, who began selling vintage furniture in 1986, created the Boxy sofa pictured here with a nod to the late Southern California designer Milo Baughman. Made from walnut veneer with steel legs, it starts at $1,495 and can be ordered in a variety of fabrics and wood finishes. The coordinating chair is $750; the coffee table is $495.
HOME & GARDEN
August 11, 2005 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
IT isn't a couch -- those have backs and arms, don't they? And when was the last time you saw a button-tufted, leathercovered cocktail table? So what is this large upholstered entity sprouting like an irradiated tuffet in so many Los Angeles homes? Say hello to the ottoman, the new coffee table. Once a lowly afterthought placed at the end of a lounge chair -- nothing more than a footrest, really -- today's ottoman is establishing its dominion.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2009 | By Chris Lee
The black-and-white photos of Michael Jackson are remarkable not only as previously unreleased images of one the last half-century's most photographed men. They also reveal much about the pop superstar's abiding impulses: his impish sense of humor, his fealty to yesteryear's master showmen and his concern about his own place in the pop culture firmament. FOR THE RECORD: Michael Jackson: An article about a new Michael Jackson coffee table book in Wednesday's Calendar section stated that the performer won five American Music Awards last month, including artist of the year.
TRAVEL
November 29, 2009
In their new coffee-table book, "The Most Beautiful Villages and Towns of the Southwest" (Thames & Hudson, $40), writer Joan Tapper and photographer Nik Wheeler turn a spotlight on 28 likely destinations in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah. Many of their favorites, such as Taos and Aspen, will come as no surprise. But then you come across Tumacacori and Tubac, Ariz.; Georgetown and Idaho Springs, Colo.; Genoa, Nev.; or Manti, Spring City and Ephraim, Utah. Even if you've done a lot of wandering around the red rocks, ghost towns and mining outposts of the West, chances are you've missed a few of these places.
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