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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1998 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a typical strip mall in the Valley lies a Kinko's, a liquor store, a Chinese restaurant, a laundry and the epicenter of Northridge's industrial-strength coffee--Common Grounds. At the corner of Reseda Boulevard and Prairie Street just a few blocks from Cal State Northridge and all those jangle-craving Matadors, Common Grounds is yet another coffeehouse with a clever name.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1998 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a typical strip mall in the Valley lies a Kinko's, a liquor store, a Chinese restaurant, a laundry and the epicenter of Northridge's industrial-strength coffee--Common Grounds. At the corner of Reseda Boulevard and Prairie Street just a few blocks from Cal State Northridge and all those jangle-craving Matadors, Common Grounds is yet another coffeehouse with a clever name.
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NEWS
July 3, 1997 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It could be called Beverly Hills High West, this Coffee Bean on the corner of Gayley and Weyburn in Westwood. It's the unofficial meeting place of BHH students, especially on Friday nights, when they command the outdoor tables before and after some mega-party. " 'Sup, Monique? Where's your boyfriend?" a lanky teen asks as he sidles up to a gaggle of girls. The females sit five to a table, long straight hair parted in the middle, their soft pink faces dabbed with soft pink makeup.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | JEANNINE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It could be called Beverly Hills High West, this Coffee Bean on the corner of Gayley and Weyburn in Westwood. It's the unofficial meeting place of BHH students, especially on Friday nights, when they command the outdoor tables before and after some mega-party. " 'Sup, Monique? Where's your boyfriend?" a lanky teen asks as he sidles up to a gaggle of girls. The females sit five to a table, long straight hair parted in the middle, their soft pink faces dabbed with soft pink makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1997 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every month or so, someone buys a "Natagram." But Natalie Sehn, who creates the intensely colored photographic prints, is not represented by an art gallery or dealer. Rather, for the last year, her work has been on display in the Eclectic Cafe in North Hollywood. "Eclectic is probably the best venue I've had," she said. "I just showed in a gallery in Philadelphia and thought I was going to make a sale there and didn't make any. It's an unpredictable thing."
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | RAY BENNETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Ray Bennett is a regular contributor to Valley Life
Why "Pericles"? Coral Suter, who is directing a production of Shakespeare's seldom-seen "Pericles, Prince of Tyre" at various city coffeehouses, includ ing Canoga Park's The Storyteller, starting this Sunday, says that is the wrong question. " 'Are you insane?' That is the question," Suter says. 'Pericles' in coffeehouses? Have you gone mad?"
BUSINESS
May 27, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diedrich Coffee Inc., moving to extend its operations throughout Southern California, said Wednesday that it will open 80 coffeehouses in the Los Angeles area. The Irvine-based company, which is seeking to establish itself as the No. 2 operator of coffeehouses behind industry giant Starbucks Coffee Co., said it has signed an agreement with a new company to set up the franchises. Under terms of the franchise deal, California Coffee Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2003 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Zooey Deschanel was surprised recently to discover she had become a shorthand descriptor. Known mostly for her deadpan, sardonic and scene-stealing performances in films such as "Mumford," "Almost Famous" and "The Good Girl," the 23-year-old heard from her older sister, also an actress, that the script for a television pilot invoked a character with the phrase "Think Zooey Deschanel." "Everybody was calling," Deschanel says with exasperated disbelief.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1998 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carl Jones, co-founder of Cross Colours--a hip but poorly managed urban clothing label that went out of business four years ago--is attempting a comeback. Jones has launched Juke Joint, an apparel line that includes shirts, sweaters, vests and dark-colored jeans. Two chains--Miller's Outpost and Mr. Raggs, which operates in the Midwest and Northwest--plan to test the line in 10 stores each. Jones has a marketing strategy, but this time he isn't relying solely on rap artists.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich, Elena Brunet and Michael Meyers / Los Angeles Times, Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
Back in 1969, four college students at Cal State Fullerton dreamed of opening a coffeehouse in Fullerton. In 1971, after two years of planning, they opened Rutabegorz, named after the rutabaga--a turnip-like vegetable. They wanted to bring to Orange County the Bohemian atmosphere found in the coffeehouses of New York and San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1997 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every month or so, someone buys a "Natagram." But Natalie Sehn, who creates the intensely colored photographic prints, is not represented by an art gallery or dealer. Rather, for the last year, her work has been on display in the Eclectic Cafe in North Hollywood. "Eclectic is probably the best venue I've had," she said. "I just showed in a gallery in Philadelphia and thought I was going to make a sale there and didn't make any. It's an unpredictable thing."
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | RAY BENNETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Ray Bennett is a regular contributor to Valley Life
Why "Pericles"? Coral Suter, who is directing a production of Shakespeare's seldom-seen "Pericles, Prince of Tyre" at various city coffeehouses, includ ing Canoga Park's The Storyteller, starting this Sunday, says that is the wrong question. " 'Are you insane?' That is the question," Suter says. 'Pericles' in coffeehouses? Have you gone mad?"
BOOKS
January 29, 1995 | DENISE HAMILTON
When veteran book dealers Fred Dorsett and Paul Hunt learned that some friends were opening a coffeehouse in Long Beach, a literary bulb went off in their heads. Why not, they thought, supply the place with used books that patrons could browse through while sipping their double espressos. The books would provide an in-house reading trove and also be on sale at the coffeehouse, which was aptly christened the Library.
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