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BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
There are so many luxurious things $50,000 will buy - a Porsche Boxster! A dozen quilted Chanel purses! A glamorous European getaway! But if you're a certain brandy lover, the money goes to two bottles of aged cognac. An anonymous collector last week dropped 19,000 pounds on a rare half-bottle of 1789 A.C. Meukow & Co. cognac, according to the Drinks Business trade publication . The same buyer also splurged on an 1830 bottle of Remy Martin cognac, shelling out 12,900 pounds.
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NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Rémy Martin Cognac has just announced that its Louis XIII Rare Cask 42.6 cognac (the number refers to the alcohol level), the second release in the Rare Cask Collection , will be sold not only at specialist retailers but also at duty-free shops at airports in London, Amsterdam, Paris, Singapore -- and Los Angeles. It's made with old casks, or tierçons , up to a century old. The Cognac is housed inside a black Baccarat crystal decanter, limited edition, bien sûr , and numbered from 1 to 738. Where was the launch of Rare Cask 42.6 held?
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NEWS
March 15, 1990 | JACK SMITH
For Christmas our younger son and his wife gave us a large trunk-like box filled with the sort of articles one sees on lists of things to keep ready in case of an earthquake. We in Southern California live in constant expectation of the Big One and a great many of us, though by no means all, have begun to prepare our earthquake kits. Ours does not contain every recommended item, but it is a good start: flashlight, batteries, jugs of water, first-aid kit, work gloves, a can of peanuts and so on.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Jay Jones
You don't need an excuse to overindulge in Vegas , but if you feel the need, there's the end of the Maya calendar on Friday. Maybe a $5,000 hamburger is what's needed for a final feast. Or, to drown one's sorrows, some fine cognac -- at just $975 a shot -- may do the trick. Hey, as the saying goes, “You can't take it with you.” Robert Flicker, a Sin City publicist,  came up with the word “ArmagedDINE” to describe the various ways in which folks can enjoy a belly-filling, wallet-draining gastronomic gratification.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | Associated Press
About 200 unemployed young people invaded one of the city's most luxurious gourmet stores Saturday to demand public assistance and jobs. The protesters knocked over tins of imported Christmas cookies and threatened fragile jars of caviar in the century-old Fauchon on the Place Madeleine. "They entered through all the doors at once. We thought we were under attack," said manager Rene Cordanie. "We represent wealth and these youngsters are Communists. What are you going to do?"
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
As if shopping on Amazon.com needed to get any more dangerous: The online retailer will now start selling wine in a dedicated section on its site, just in time for the holidays. Visitors to Amazon Wine will have access to more than 1,000 wines from wineries nationwide. Bottle prices range from less than $10 to more than $100, plus shipping costs of $9.99 for up to six bottles. Amazon will serve as a sort of middle man and discovery center, partnering with wineries that provide the wine and use the online marketplace to raise awareness for their brands and make sales.
NEWS
August 24, 2009
Studded fashions: A photo caption in Sunday's Image section accompanying an article about accessories and shoes embellished with metal studs and spikes gave the price for a Tory Burch bowling bag purse in cognac as $165. The correct price is $595.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1985
Ruth Reichl certainly did a hatchet job on La Chaumiere ("In Retreat From La Chaumiere," May 19). What I don't understand is why she returned so many times for "so many mediocre meals." Does The Times pick up the tab? I would like to volunteer for such a stressful job as dining in a place where I am insulted with good champagne, port and cognac. JANET HECKER Hollywood
FOOD
July 12, 1990 | DAN BERGER, DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
Americans are drinking less alcohol these days. But when we do drink, we are buying better . . . and spending more, sometimes hundreds of dollars for a single bottle. Call it: The Super Spirits syndrome. Liquor producers, scrambling to maintain profits in the face of shrinking sales, are encouraging the upscaling of the American drinker. Higher-quality products are appearing on more and more store shelves; at the same time less of each product is being distilled.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Uncooperative weather has damaged grapes worldwide, causing global wine production to shrivel 6.1% to its lowest point since 1975, according to a Paris-based trade group. Between dwindling vineyard space and tough climate conditions that pummeled mega-producers France and Italy, wine output could tumble to 248.2 million hectoliters this year, or 6.6 billion gallons, according to the International Organization for Vine and Wine. That's the smallest amount in 37 years, Director General Federico Castellucci said at a Paris press conference, acco rding to Bloomberg . In 2011, the industry produced 264.2 million hectoliters of vino, according to the group, which is known as OIV. Growth rates are positive in the U.S. and the southern hemisphere in countries such as South Africa.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
As if shopping on Amazon.com needed to get any more dangerous: The online retailer will now start selling wine in a dedicated section on its site, just in time for the holidays. Visitors to Amazon Wine will have access to more than 1,000 wines from wineries nationwide. Bottle prices range from less than $10 to more than $100, plus shipping costs of $9.99 for up to six bottles. Amazon will serve as a sort of middle man and discovery center, partnering with wineries that provide the wine and use the online marketplace to raise awareness for their brands and make sales.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Uncooperative weather has damaged grapes worldwide, causing global wine production to shrivel 6.1% to its lowest point since 1975, according to a Paris-based trade group. Between dwindling vineyard space and tough climate conditions that pummeled mega-producers France and Italy, wine output could tumble to 248.2 million hectoliters this year, or 6.6 billion gallons, according to the International Organization for Vine and Wine. That's the smallest amount in 37 years, Director General Federico Castellucci said at a Paris press conference, acco rding to Bloomberg . In 2011, the industry produced 264.2 million hectoliters of vino, according to the group, which is known as OIV. Growth rates are positive in the U.S. and the southern hemisphere in countries such as South Africa.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
There are so many luxurious things $50,000 will buy - a Porsche Boxster! A dozen quilted Chanel purses! A glamorous European getaway! But if you're a certain brandy lover, the money goes to two bottles of aged cognac. An anonymous collector last week dropped 19,000 pounds on a rare half-bottle of 1789 A.C. Meukow & Co. cognac, according to the Drinks Business trade publication . The same buyer also splurged on an 1830 bottle of Remy Martin cognac, shelling out 12,900 pounds.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2012 | By Matt Stevens
Despite a lagging economy and a debt crisis in Europe, global sales of cognac hit record highs in 2011, industry body Bureau National Interprofessional du Cognac (BNIC) announced Saturday. The brandy sold at a rate of more than five bottles per second last year, sparking the 6.4% surge attributed mainly to soaring demand for the product in China. Exports to that country rose 20%, according to the BNIC. Overall, consumers purchased 162.9 million bottles of cognac in 2011. The Far East remained one of the biggest regional markets for cognac, accounting for more than one-third of total demand.
SPORTS
December 3, 2009 | By Broderick Turner and Mike Bresnahan
Lakers forward Ron Artest created more controversy for himself after he said in an article published Wednesday that he drank alcohol during games while playing for the Chicago Bulls early in his career. Artest told the Sporting News that he used to drink Hennessey cognac at halftime of games in part because the Bulls were losing so often. "I [kept it] in my locker," he said. Artest played 2 1/2 seasons for Chicago after being drafted as a 19-year-old from St. John's in 1999. The story prompted the NBA to investigate Artest's comments.
TRAVEL
October 18, 2009 | Rosemary McClure
The sunlit French landscape sliding by my car window captured my attention: crumbling stone walls, tidy farmhouses with red-tile roofs, mile upon mile of low hills and rolling ridges covered with leafy green vineyards. "You know what you're seeing?" my guide asked. "The real thing; what Napa and Sonoma wanted to be." I laughed at the smugness of the remark. As much as I love Northern California's wine country, he had a point: The original wins, hands down. Visiting our wine country can't compare with spending a few lazy days exploring the back roads of France.
FOOD
June 18, 1987
This Sunday marks the 77th consecutive year Father's Day has been observed in the United States. One thing that probably hasn't changed in all that time is the appreciation most dads have for a delicious dinner served on their special day. If he doesn't have a specific request, surprise Dad with Pork Steaks Au Poivre and Vegetable Rice. The blade steaks, enhanced by a savory marinade, will be even more flavorful when the same marinade is reserved, heated and served as a sauce.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Jay Jones
You don't need an excuse to overindulge in Vegas , but if you feel the need, there's the end of the Maya calendar on Friday. Maybe a $5,000 hamburger is what's needed for a final feast. Or, to drown one's sorrows, some fine cognac -- at just $975 a shot -- may do the trick. Hey, as the saying goes, “You can't take it with you.” Robert Flicker, a Sin City publicist,  came up with the word “ArmagedDINE” to describe the various ways in which folks can enjoy a belly-filling, wallet-draining gastronomic gratification.
NEWS
August 24, 2009
Studded fashions: A photo caption in Sunday's Image section accompanying an article about accessories and shoes embellished with metal studs and spikes gave the price for a Tory Burch bowling bag purse in cognac as $165. The correct price is $595.
FOOD
December 15, 2004 | Leslie Brenner, Times Staff Writer
Some people leave cookies for Santa Claus; others leave a little brandy. My father used to soak cookies -- Pecan Sandies, to be exact -- in Cognac, but then he ate them, slowly, with a fork, rather than leaving them for Santa, in whom he did not believe. But for those who do, and who further believe that Santa is a bon vivant, brandy is an essential flavor of the season. It puts the pizazz into eggnog and warms up cookies, cakes and hard sauces.
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