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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

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NEWS
August 24, 2010
Roughly 9 million American adults ( 4.1% to 4.4% of the population ) are thought to suffer from  attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). And even among those who have been diagnosed and medicated for the condition, life can be a continuing cycle of disorganization, procrastination, missed deadlines and unfinished business. A form of psychotherapy that focuses on changing patterns of thought and behavior that are counterproductive can help these adults, a new study concludes.
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HEALTH
March 24, 2012 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Your smartphone: It's not just for texting, tweeting, waging war against little green pigs and - oh, right - calling people. It's also for making yourself a happier, less stressed-out, more self-aware person. Really, there's an app for that. Any number of apps. They come with names like Mood Swing and CBTReferee and BrainFreqz, and at their best, they offer users "'treatment' in the palm of their hand," says Dr. John Luo, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA.
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HEALTH
January 11, 2010 | By Eric Jaffe >>>
If your doctor advised a treatment that involved leeches and bloodletting, you might take a second glance at that diploma on the wall. For the same reason, you should think twice about whom you see as a therapist, says a team of psychological researchers. In a November report that's attracting controversy the way couches attract loose change, three professors charge that many mental health practitioners are using antiquated, unproved methods and that many clinical psychology training programs lack scientific rigor.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Tammy Worth, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Karen Smuland has always been an anxious person. But after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on New York's World Trade Center, she had her first panic attack and ended up in an emergency room, convinced that she was dying. The 48-year-old architect from Bend, Ore., was quickly diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. In the years since then, she has struggled to gain mastery over the condition through a mixture of therapy, medication and a lot of trial and error. She tried several medications before settling on the anti-anxiety drug Effexor, the only one that didn't give her troublesome side effects.
HEALTH
March 24, 2012 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Your smartphone: It's not just for texting, tweeting, waging war against little green pigs and - oh, right - calling people. It's also for making yourself a happier, less stressed-out, more self-aware person. Really, there's an app for that. Any number of apps. They come with names like Mood Swing and CBTReferee and BrainFreqz, and at their best, they offer users "'treatment' in the palm of their hand," says Dr. John Luo, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA.
HEALTH
August 27, 2007
Is there a sleep aid that would help me sleep for two to four hours? I have insomnia where I often wake at 3 or 4 a.m. Sue Paso Robles There are several cognitive and behavioral techniques that may help you stay asleep at night, says Dr. Jeffrey Ellenbogen, director of sleep medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Some simple suggestions include: Keep a regular sleep schedule (go to sleep and wake up at the same time, night after night, even on the weekends)
HEALTH
November 23, 2009 | By Melissa Healy
Three of the most common and most powerful triggers for binge eaters -- family, food and feelings -- converge at this time of year, making the holidays an especially challenging time. For some people, the loneliness of separation from family prompts a bubbling up of conflicts, guilt and painful childhood memories; for others, the family reunions themselves are the stressors. The resulting feelings of anger, frustration, sadness and isolation can lead many binge eaters to reach for the closest form of solace, or self-punishment, at hand: the food that is a central feature of holiday gatherings.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Depression is a common illness, and there are many forms of treatment. While antidepressant medications are highly popular and often work well, patients should not underestimate the power of non-pharmaceutical approaches. In a study published Wednesday, researchers reviewed the scientific literature on a type of talk therapy called interpersonal psychotherapy. This is talk therapy that takes place for a limited period of time during which the therapist and patient identify the problem, such as grief, and work on strategies in interpersonal relationships that will improve the situation.
HEALTH
February 20, 2006 | Garret Condon, Hartford Courant
The traditional patient-therapist dynamic has evolved. No longer is it confined to the couch and the 55-minute session. Psychologists and other therapists now teach classes and workshops, expound before TV-studio audiences, write self-help books, create websites and are featured on countless DVDs, CDs and MP3s. And as they share their trade secrets of personal change and discovery, they've become less like all-powerful healers and more like co-equal coaches and teachers.
HEALTH
October 7, 2002 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: I am having trouble getting insurance and suspect my prescription for Luvox, which I take for trichotillomania, might be to blame. It's usually prescribed for psychological problems. Is there a non-drug treatment for my compulsion to pull my hair so I can stop taking Luvox? Answer: People who suffer from trichotillomania have an uncontrollable urge to pull out their hair, sometimes leaving bald spots. Luvox belongs to the same category of drugs as Prozac and Zoloft.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Depression is a common illness, and there are many forms of treatment. While antidepressant medications are highly popular and often work well, patients should not underestimate the power of non-pharmaceutical approaches. In a study published Wednesday, researchers reviewed the scientific literature on a type of talk therapy called interpersonal psychotherapy. This is talk therapy that takes place for a limited period of time during which the therapist and patient identify the problem, such as grief, and work on strategies in interpersonal relationships that will improve the situation.
NEWS
August 24, 2010
Roughly 9 million American adults ( 4.1% to 4.4% of the population ) are thought to suffer from  attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). And even among those who have been diagnosed and medicated for the condition, life can be a continuing cycle of disorganization, procrastination, missed deadlines and unfinished business. A form of psychotherapy that focuses on changing patterns of thought and behavior that are counterproductive can help these adults, a new study concludes.
NEWS
August 18, 2010
People with fibromyalgia have to think creatively for relief from their symptoms. There are only a few approved medications for the condition, which causes chronic aches and pains, sleep disturbances, fatigue and depression. Many patients opt for a combination of medications, lifestyle changes and cognitive behavioral therapy to remain functional. A study released Wednesday suggests that tai chi, a Chinese form of martial arts, significantly improves symptoms . Tai chi is a mind-body practice that uses gentle movement, breathing exercises and relaxation to move energy -- called qi -- throughout the body.
HEALTH
January 11, 2010 | By Eric Jaffe >>>
If your doctor advised a treatment that involved leeches and bloodletting, you might take a second glance at that diploma on the wall. For the same reason, you should think twice about whom you see as a therapist, says a team of psychological researchers. In a November report that's attracting controversy the way couches attract loose change, three professors charge that many mental health practitioners are using antiquated, unproved methods and that many clinical psychology training programs lack scientific rigor.
HEALTH
November 23, 2009 | By Melissa Healy
Three of the most common and most powerful triggers for binge eaters -- family, food and feelings -- converge at this time of year, making the holidays an especially challenging time. For some people, the loneliness of separation from family prompts a bubbling up of conflicts, guilt and painful childhood memories; for others, the family reunions themselves are the stressors. The resulting feelings of anger, frustration, sadness and isolation can lead many binge eaters to reach for the closest form of solace, or self-punishment, at hand: the food that is a central feature of holiday gatherings.
HEALTH
November 3, 2008 | Francesca Lunzer Kritz, Kritz is a freelance writer.
Health insurers are sometimes better known for causing sleepless nights than for creating restful ones, but in the last few months, helping consumers get a good night's sleep has become a priority for most of the top-tier U.S. health insurance companies, including WellPoint, Aetna, Cigna, Kaiser Permanente and several Blue Cross plans. Their new programs don't involve sleeping pills. Instead, insurers are advocating the use of cognitive behavior therapy.
NEWS
August 18, 2010
People with fibromyalgia have to think creatively for relief from their symptoms. There are only a few approved medications for the condition, which causes chronic aches and pains, sleep disturbances, fatigue and depression. Many patients opt for a combination of medications, lifestyle changes and cognitive behavioral therapy to remain functional. A study released Wednesday suggests that tai chi, a Chinese form of martial arts, significantly improves symptoms . Tai chi is a mind-body practice that uses gentle movement, breathing exercises and relaxation to move energy -- called qi -- throughout the body.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Tammy Worth, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Karen Smuland has always been an anxious person. But after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on New York's World Trade Center, she had her first panic attack and ended up in an emergency room, convinced that she was dying. The 48-year-old architect from Bend, Ore., was quickly diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. In the years since then, she has struggled to gain mastery over the condition through a mixture of therapy, medication and a lot of trial and error. She tried several medications before settling on the anti-anxiety drug Effexor, the only one that didn't give her troublesome side effects.
HEALTH
August 27, 2007
Is there a sleep aid that would help me sleep for two to four hours? I have insomnia where I often wake at 3 or 4 a.m. Sue Paso Robles There are several cognitive and behavioral techniques that may help you stay asleep at night, says Dr. Jeffrey Ellenbogen, director of sleep medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Some simple suggestions include: Keep a regular sleep schedule (go to sleep and wake up at the same time, night after night, even on the weekends)
HEALTH
February 20, 2006 | Garret Condon, Hartford Courant
The traditional patient-therapist dynamic has evolved. No longer is it confined to the couch and the 55-minute session. Psychologists and other therapists now teach classes and workshops, expound before TV-studio audiences, write self-help books, create websites and are featured on countless DVDs, CDs and MP3s. And as they share their trade secrets of personal change and discovery, they've become less like all-powerful healers and more like co-equal coaches and teachers.
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