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Cognitive Function

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987
Thank you, Judith Paterson, for saying so well what so many of us believe. After having worked many hours in many different intensive care units where we ruthlessly flog these nearly dead bodies in an effort to squeeze out a few more days of "life," I have come to suspect that after these poor people have lost the ability to talk, eat, control bowel and bladder functions, or think, the only cognitive function left to them is the ability to sense pain....
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HEALTH
May 7, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Tightly controlling the blood sugar levels of diabetics, even with the attendant risk of dangerously low levels of blood glucose, does not damage mental abilities, researchers have found. Patients did not suffer in tests of intelligence, memory, coordination, language and other mental abilities, they reported in the May 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "It certainly helps decrease a worry that I get asked about a lot," Dr.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Low levels of testosterone in the bloodstream could indicate that a man is at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Scientists have long thought that estrogen protects cognitive function in women and wanted to see if testosterone might have a similar effect in men, either reducing the incidence of Alzheimer's or delaying its onset.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | CHRIS RUBIN
It isn't the pink stuff that lends itself to bubble-blowing, nor does it look (or presumably taste) like the gray matter of its namesake organ. Brain Gum--small, yellowish cubes that look similar to Nicorettes--claims to surpass ginkgo biloba as a nutritional supplement intended to improve memory. While ginkgo can aid those with decreased circulation--mostly the elderly--Brain Gum and its active ingredient (phosphatidyl serine) may facilitate neurotransmitter action and synaptic communication.
HEALTH
June 25, 2001 | SUSAN OKIE, WASHINGTON POST
Almost anyone who has flown across several time zones has experienced jet lag--the fatigue, mental fogginess and vague discomfort felt by travelers whose body clocks are out of sync with their environment. But for some long-distance fliers, jet lag may be more than just a temporary annoyance.
SCIENCE
August 7, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Older chocoholics may have a new excuse to indulge their cravings: The dark stuff not only soothes the soul, but might also sharpen the mind.  In a study published Wednesday in the journal Neurology, researchers reported that chocolate may help improve brain health and thinking skills in the elderly . The Boston-based team found that older people who initially performed poorly on a memory and reasoning test and also had reduced blood flow...
HEALTH
August 23, 2004 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
The popular image of the Olympics is one of deafening crowds, cheering their athletes to victory. But this month, after a lifetime of training, squads of archers, fencers, gymnasts, weight lifters, swimmers and pole vaulters have flocked to Athens only to find -- well -- not very many fans. Some people might shrug off the empty seats as simply an unfortunate detail.
HEALTH
December 20, 2010 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We all know what aging looks like from the outside: wrinkled skin, gray hair, a growing need to turn up the volume on "Jeopardy. " But in recent years, scientists have made some breakthrough discoveries about how we age on the inside, right down to our genes. The science of aging has created a glimmer of hope that we could someday slow the process ? a dream that has already spread beyond the lab to the marketplace. Anti-aging research used to be mainly about finding new ways to get lab mice to take their vitamins.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Around the time of menopause, many women complain of mental slippage. But, as if to inflict some perverse trick upon them, cognitive scientists have found that they actually perform no more poorly than women who do not have such complaints. (Reassuring in a way: You're not losing your memory, but you may be losing your mind.) A new study finds that both the women who complain of memory problems and the cognitive scientists are right. These women haven't fallen behind -- not yet at least-- because their brains are working harder to keep up. The study, presented Sunday at the Society for Neuroscience's yearly confab -- held this year in Washington, D.C. -- recruited 22 healthy women with an average age of 57, all post-menopausal.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
Lapsed musical instrumentalists (and their disappointed parents): Take heart! The child that gets even a few years of formal musical training before quitting those weekly lessons continues to show evidence that his or her brain has been changed in ways that improve mental function, says a new study. The latest research found that even years after they stopped practicing, young adults who had taken as little as two or three years of instrumental music training in their elementary or middle-school years showed a more robust brain response to sounds than those who had no formal musical training.
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