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Cognitive Function

HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Five medications have been approved to treat the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. The drugs can reduce some symptoms — such as difficulties with memory, language, attention and reasoning — especially in the early stages of the disease. They can, accordingly, improve quality of life, but they don't work for everyone, and none of them works permanently. Eventually the disease will overtake the drugs' ability to compensate. Four of the medications are cholinesterase inhibitors.
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SCIENCE
August 12, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
With no cure in hand for Alzheimer's disease, many ask why someone would necessarily want an early diagnosis. But research continues to focus on detecting the earliest signs of dementia, and on the factors that give rise to some dementias or fuel their relentless progression. Those findings may point the way to prevention strategies. And they may allow physicians to recognize Alzheimer's disease and other dementias before they have taken a measurable toll. Stopping or slowing it there might be easier than reversing it, and could, for all practical purposes, be as good as a cure.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Federal health regulators said Friday that they were reviewing an experimental use of blockbuster anemia drugs made by Amgen Inc. and Johnson & Johnson that have been associated with higher death rates in a study involving stroke patients. This month J&J reported results from a German trial in which more stroke patients treated with its drug Eprex died than those taking a placebo.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | CHRIS RUBIN
It isn't the pink stuff that lends itself to bubble-blowing, nor does it look (or presumably taste) like the gray matter of its namesake organ. Brain Gum--small, yellowish cubes that look similar to Nicorettes--claims to surpass ginkgo biloba as a nutritional supplement intended to improve memory. While ginkgo can aid those with decreased circulation--mostly the elderly--Brain Gum and its active ingredient (phosphatidyl serine) may facilitate neurotransmitter action and synaptic communication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987
Thank you, Judith Paterson, for saying so well what so many of us believe. After having worked many hours in many different intensive care units where we ruthlessly flog these nearly dead bodies in an effort to squeeze out a few more days of "life," I have come to suspect that after these poor people have lost the ability to talk, eat, control bowel and bladder functions, or think, the only cognitive function left to them is the ability to sense pain....
HEALTH
May 7, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Tightly controlling the blood sugar levels of diabetics, even with the attendant risk of dangerously low levels of blood glucose, does not damage mental abilities, researchers have found. Patients did not suffer in tests of intelligence, memory, coordination, language and other mental abilities, they reported in the May 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "It certainly helps decrease a worry that I get asked about a lot," Dr.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Low levels of testosterone in the bloodstream could indicate that a man is at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Scientists have long thought that estrogen protects cognitive function in women and wanted to see if testosterone might have a similar effect in men, either reducing the incidence of Alzheimer's or delaying its onset.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Around the time of menopause, many women complain of mental slippage. But, as if to inflict some perverse trick upon them, cognitive scientists have found that they actually perform no more poorly than women who do not have such complaints. (Reassuring in a way: You're not losing your memory, but you may be losing your mind.) A new study finds that both the women who complain of memory problems and the cognitive scientists are right. These women haven't fallen behind -- not yet at least-- because their brains are working harder to keep up. The study, presented Sunday at the Society for Neuroscience's yearly confab -- held this year in Washington, D.C. -- recruited 22 healthy women with an average age of 57, all post-menopausal.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Melissa Healy
A biological medication already widely used to treat plaque psoriasis may be able to slow the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a new study has found. The same study found that in older mice with established Alzheimer's, this treatment approach, which suppresses the brain's immune reaction to beta amyloid, brought a marked improvement in cognitive function and may even halt or reverse early signs of Alzheimer's. The new study was published this week in the journal Nature Medicine.
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