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Cognitive Function

NEWS
June 14, 1999 | CHRIS RUBIN
It isn't the pink stuff that lends itself to bubble-blowing, nor does it look (or presumably taste) like the gray matter of its namesake organ. Brain Gum--small, yellowish cubes that look similar to Nicorettes--claims to surpass ginkgo biloba as a nutritional supplement intended to improve memory. While ginkgo can aid those with decreased circulation--mostly the elderly--Brain Gum and its active ingredient (phosphatidyl serine) may facilitate neurotransmitter action and synaptic communication.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987
Thank you, Judith Paterson, for saying so well what so many of us believe. After having worked many hours in many different intensive care units where we ruthlessly flog these nearly dead bodies in an effort to squeeze out a few more days of "life," I have come to suspect that after these poor people have lost the ability to talk, eat, control bowel and bladder functions, or think, the only cognitive function left to them is the ability to sense pain....
HEALTH
May 7, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Tightly controlling the blood sugar levels of diabetics, even with the attendant risk of dangerously low levels of blood glucose, does not damage mental abilities, researchers have found. Patients did not suffer in tests of intelligence, memory, coordination, language and other mental abilities, they reported in the May 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "It certainly helps decrease a worry that I get asked about a lot," Dr.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Low levels of testosterone in the bloodstream could indicate that a man is at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Scientists have long thought that estrogen protects cognitive function in women and wanted to see if testosterone might have a similar effect in men, either reducing the incidence of Alzheimer's or delaying its onset.
HEALTH
July 26, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Five medications have been approved to treat the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. The drugs can reduce some symptoms — such as difficulties with memory, language, attention and reasoning — especially in the early stages of the disease. They can, accordingly, improve quality of life, but they don't work for everyone, and none of them works permanently. Eventually the disease will overtake the drugs' ability to compensate. Four of the medications are cholinesterase inhibitors.
HEALTH
September 6, 2010 | By Valerie Ulene, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I'm 46, and there are days when it feels like I'm completely losing my mind. I misplace my car keys, struggle to remember details of recent conversations, and can't recall seemingly anybody's name. To help cope with my mental cloudiness, I always keep an extra set of keys nearby, write endless sticky notes to myself, and frequently opt for the generic "hello" over more personalized greetings. Strategies like these may help me get through my day, but they fail to calm the nagging concern that something is seriously wrong with me. They also do nothing to combat the other "symptoms" that have developed over the last year or two, namely trouble sleeping and a vague sense of doom and gloom.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Around the time of menopause, many women complain of mental slippage. But, as if to inflict some perverse trick upon them, cognitive scientists have found that they actually perform no more poorly than women who do not have such complaints. (Reassuring in a way: You're not losing your memory, but you may be losing your mind.) A new study finds that both the women who complain of memory problems and the cognitive scientists are right. These women haven't fallen behind -- not yet at least-- because their brains are working harder to keep up. The study, presented Sunday at the Society for Neuroscience's yearly confab -- held this year in Washington, D.C. -- recruited 22 healthy women with an average age of 57, all post-menopausal.
SCIENCE
October 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Scientists have performed the first successful neural stem cell transplant into the brains of four boys with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. The disorder is a rare but tragic condition that impacts motor abilities, coordination and cognitive function. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease does its damage by stripping away the fatty substance called myelin that surrounds brain cells. Myelin acts as an insulator, like rubber on the outside of a wire, helping the electrical impulses that carry information in the brain travel at high speeds.
HEALTH
April 19, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I have suffered from insomnia for many years. My doctor prescribed Ambien , but it doesn't seem to be working very well anymore. I also suspect that it affected my memory. Now the doctor is suggesting the antidepressant amitriptyline (Elavil) . The side effects I have read about make me nervous. Is there any herb or home remedy that might help me get some sleep? Amitriptyline is an old-fashioned (tricyclic) antidepressant. Some people experience a morning hangover effect that leaves them drowsy and disoriented.
HEALTH
January 29, 2001 | EMMA ROSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the biggest study to date examining the influence of birth weight on intelligence, scientists have found that babies born on the heavy side of normal tend to be brighter as adults. Experts have long known that premature or underweight babies tend to be less intelligent as children. But the study, published this week in the British Medical Journal, found that among children whose birth weight was higher than 5.
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