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Cognitive Function

BUSINESS
September 27, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Federal health regulators said Friday that they were reviewing an experimental use of blockbuster anemia drugs made by Amgen Inc. and Johnson & Johnson that have been associated with higher death rates in a study involving stroke patients. This month J&J reported results from a German trial in which more stroke patients treated with its drug Eprex died than those taking a placebo.
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NEWS
June 14, 1999 | CHRIS RUBIN
It isn't the pink stuff that lends itself to bubble-blowing, nor does it look (or presumably taste) like the gray matter of its namesake organ. Brain Gum--small, yellowish cubes that look similar to Nicorettes--claims to surpass ginkgo biloba as a nutritional supplement intended to improve memory. While ginkgo can aid those with decreased circulation--mostly the elderly--Brain Gum and its active ingredient (phosphatidyl serine) may facilitate neurotransmitter action and synaptic communication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1987
Thank you, Judith Paterson, for saying so well what so many of us believe. After having worked many hours in many different intensive care units where we ruthlessly flog these nearly dead bodies in an effort to squeeze out a few more days of "life," I have come to suspect that after these poor people have lost the ability to talk, eat, control bowel and bladder functions, or think, the only cognitive function left to them is the ability to sense pain....
HEALTH
May 7, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Tightly controlling the blood sugar levels of diabetics, even with the attendant risk of dangerously low levels of blood glucose, does not damage mental abilities, researchers have found. Patients did not suffer in tests of intelligence, memory, coordination, language and other mental abilities, they reported in the May 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "It certainly helps decrease a worry that I get asked about a lot," Dr.
HEALTH
February 2, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Low levels of testosterone in the bloodstream could indicate that a man is at increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Scientists have long thought that estrogen protects cognitive function in women and wanted to see if testosterone might have a similar effect in men, either reducing the incidence of Alzheimer's or delaying its onset.
HEALTH
April 5, 2004 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
There's little argument that exercise is good for your body, but researchers have found that exercising to music may make you smarter too. An Ohio State University study found that verbal skills improved significantly in cardiac rehabilitation patients who exercised on a treadmill while listening to Vivaldi's "Four Seasons." "There have been a number of studies that have looked at the effects of just exercise or music on cognitive function," said Charles F.
HEALTH
December 23, 2002 | Shari Roan
Ginkgo trees, native to China, can live as long as 1,000 years. It may be this longevity that has convinced people over the ages that the leaves can give elderly people more vigor. As far back as ancient China, ginkgo biloba was considered to be good for the heart and lungs. Extracts made from the tree's leaves continue to be among the most popular herbal remedies in the world today.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2002 | LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adolescent soccer players need better education about the symptoms of concussion and dangers of playing with head injuries, medical experts said Tuesday. In a new report, the Institute of Medicine, part of the National Academy of Sciences, said that studies of the effects of "heading"--hitting the ball with the head--have been inconclusive and that additional research is needed. But the risk of concussion in contact sports, including soccer is real, according to the report.
NEWS
October 13, 2010
Walking promotes good physical health, but it may also help maintain memory and cognitive function for years, a study finds. The research, published online Wednesday in the journal Neurology , is based on a study of 299 men and women, average age 78, who were followed for nine years. The study participants were asked about their physical activity, which was calculated as number of blocks walked per week (walking was the most common exercise). Study subjects walked from zero to 300 blocks over a one-week period.
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