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NEWS
October 5, 2010
Drinking during pregnancy is considered a serious no-no by many women, and there's evidence to show that heavy imbibing while pregnant may be linked with developmental problems in children. But a new study finds that babies born of light drinkers may not show any greater risk of cognitive or emotional problems than women who abstain from alcohol during pregnancy. The research, published online Tuesday in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, analyzed data from a UK cohort study of 11,513 children born between 2000 and 2002.
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NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Concussion research has yet to turn up therapies that can diminish the consequences of a mild traumatic brain injury or shorten the duration of its symptoms, the nation's leading group of neurologists concluded on Monday. But in athletics, there is one step that can avert lengthening symptoms or exacerbating damage from a blow to the head, the American Academy of Neurology wrote: Take the athlete out of the game or off the practice field when a concussion is suspected, and delay his or her return to play until the all-clear has been issued by a trainer or physician skilled in diagnosing and treating brain injury.
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NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/ For the Booster Shots Blog
Chronic pain can bring on depression , problems of memory and concentration, and general brain fog -- a fact well known to many of the 50 million American adults who live with pain that has settled in for a long stay. But a study published Wednesday finds that changes in the brain that come with chronic pain can be reversed when the hurt is treated effectively. The study , published in the Journal of Neuroscience, looked at sufferers of chronic low-back pain--a substantial slice of those with daily pain -- and compared their brain responses to cognitive tests and their brains' structures before and after they got treatment.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Middle-aged men who smoke suffered more rapid cognitive decline than peers who have never smoked or who have been ex-smokers for at least 10 years, researchers reported Monday in the Archives of General Psychiatry . Smoking is known to be a risk factor for dementia in the aged, but the extent to which it is a risk factor for cognitive problems earlier in life is less-well understood, wrote the team. Led by Severine Sabia of University College London's Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, the researchers looked at data collected from 5,099 men and 2,137 women.
HEALTH
May 24, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The cellphone conversations going on around us — in the grocery store, mall, airport, elevator, on the bus, etc. — are by now ubiquitous. But they still feel intrusive. A new study suggests our brains simply don't like these one-sided chats. Researchers at Cornell University conducted a series of tests to gauge people's reactions when exposed to four background noise settings: silence, a monologue, a conversation between two people and half a conversation (called a halfalogue)
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Exergames -- exercise combined with virtual reality -- might give a cognitive boost to older people more than regular workouts, researchers have found. A study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine focused on 79 men and women ages 58 to 99 who did three months of regular exercise on a stationary bicycle or three months of exergaming on cybercycles. The cybercycles had a virtual reality display that let riders take part in 3-D tours and compete against a ghost rider avatar.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
Type 2 diabetes is linked with a number of health problems, but a new study finds that older diabetics who have high blood pressure, gait and balance problems or think their health is poor may be at higher risk for cognitive problems. Researchers looked at 13 potential variables that could affect cognition, including grip strength, blood pressure, involvement in physical activities, social engagement, gait and balance, and a subjective measure of a person's health. The study participants, from British Columbia, included 41 people with Type 2 diabetes age 55 to 81, and a matched group of 458 healthy people that served as a control.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Middle-aged men who smoke suffered more rapid cognitive decline than peers who have never smoked or who have been ex-smokers for at least 10 years, researchers reported Monday in the Archives of General Psychiatry . Smoking is known to be a risk factor for dementia in the aged, but the extent to which it is a risk factor for cognitive problems earlier in life is less-well understood, wrote the team. Led by Severine Sabia of University College London's Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, the researchers looked at data collected from 5,099 men and 2,137 women.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Concussion research has yet to turn up therapies that can diminish the consequences of a mild traumatic brain injury or shorten the duration of its symptoms, the nation's leading group of neurologists concluded on Monday. But in athletics, there is one step that can avert lengthening symptoms or exacerbating damage from a blow to the head, the American Academy of Neurology wrote: Take the athlete out of the game or off the practice field when a concussion is suspected, and delay his or her return to play until the all-clear has been issued by a trainer or physician skilled in diagnosing and treating brain injury.
OPINION
October 18, 2013 | By Robert M. Sapolsky
There's a phrase that has haunted America for decades, one fraught with failure: "Breaking the cycle of poverty. " Despite the ongoing efforts of government and a host of private foundations, income inequality continues to grow and the poor are ever more likely to remain poor. Many factors favor the rich getting richer while the poor stagnate. The wealthy benefit from economies of scale, as the best prices and lowest interest rates are more readily available to those who least need them.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Exergames -- exercise combined with virtual reality -- might give a cognitive boost to older people more than regular workouts, researchers have found. A study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine focused on 79 men and women ages 58 to 99 who did three months of regular exercise on a stationary bicycle or three months of exergaming on cybercycles. The cybercycles had a virtual reality display that let riders take part in 3-D tours and compete against a ghost rider avatar.
NEWS
May 18, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/ For the Booster Shots Blog
Chronic pain can bring on depression , problems of memory and concentration, and general brain fog -- a fact well known to many of the 50 million American adults who live with pain that has settled in for a long stay. But a study published Wednesday finds that changes in the brain that come with chronic pain can be reversed when the hurt is treated effectively. The study , published in the Journal of Neuroscience, looked at sufferers of chronic low-back pain--a substantial slice of those with daily pain -- and compared their brain responses to cognitive tests and their brains' structures before and after they got treatment.
NEWS
October 5, 2010
Drinking during pregnancy is considered a serious no-no by many women, and there's evidence to show that heavy imbibing while pregnant may be linked with developmental problems in children. But a new study finds that babies born of light drinkers may not show any greater risk of cognitive or emotional problems than women who abstain from alcohol during pregnancy. The research, published online Tuesday in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, analyzed data from a UK cohort study of 11,513 children born between 2000 and 2002.
NEWS
September 1, 2010
Type 2 diabetes is linked with a number of health problems, but a new study finds that older diabetics who have high blood pressure, gait and balance problems or think their health is poor may be at higher risk for cognitive problems. Researchers looked at 13 potential variables that could affect cognition, including grip strength, blood pressure, involvement in physical activities, social engagement, gait and balance, and a subjective measure of a person's health. The study participants, from British Columbia, included 41 people with Type 2 diabetes age 55 to 81, and a matched group of 458 healthy people that served as a control.
HEALTH
May 24, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
The cellphone conversations going on around us — in the grocery store, mall, airport, elevator, on the bus, etc. — are by now ubiquitous. But they still feel intrusive. A new study suggests our brains simply don't like these one-sided chats. Researchers at Cornell University conducted a series of tests to gauge people's reactions when exposed to four background noise settings: silence, a monologue, a conversation between two people and half a conversation (called a halfalogue)
NEWS
September 6, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease will one day be accomplished with biological markers, such as tests of blood or spinal fluid. Already several biomarker tests are in development. But a new study shows that, for now, the old-fashioned cognitive tests using pen and paper are the most accurate. Researchers looked at 116 people with mild cognitive impairment who developed Alzheimer's disease in two years, 204 people with mild cognitive impairment that did not develop the disease and 197 cognitively healthy people.
SPORTS
April 19, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
A yearlong study of boxers' and mixed martial-arts fighters' brain activity has found those who fight for more than six years begin to experience damage and those who fight longer than 12 years expose themselves to an even greater decline each time they return to the ring. "What we've found suggests changes and damage in the brain happens years before symptoms emerge," said Dr. Charles Bernick, author of the study. "It's what we see in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients. " Bernick has supervised MRIs and computerized and cognitive tests of an estimated 170 fighters at the Cleveland Clinic's Las Vegas center in the past year.
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