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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The news of a Northern California couple's discovery of more than 1,400 gold coins hidden on their property has experts, history buffs and regular folks speculating on the treasure's origin. Though officials said it is unlikely the coins were stolen in a turn-of-the-century theft at the U.S. Mint in San Francisco, some wonder if the cache could be one of many believed buried by the  Knights of the Golden Circle . The secretive, subversive Confederate group is thought to have hidden millions in ill-gotten gold across a dozen states to finance a second Civil War. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins The coins very well could be a fortune buried by a wealthy businessman, but the time period, markers near the cache and manner in which the coins were buried fit the mold of the KGC, said Warren Getler, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who coauthored “Rebel Gold,” a book about the group.
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WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
For anyone who blinked and missed Russian President Vladimir Putin's swift seizure and annexation of Ukraine's Crimea region, there's now a giant silver coin celebrating the Kremlin leader for bringing the territory "back home. " The coins issued by the Art Grani foundry in the Russian city of Chelyabinsk feature Putin's bas relief image on one side and a map of the Crimean peninsula on the other. "Crimea's reunification with Russia was a historic event which we decided to embody in a souvenir collection of coins,” Vladimir Vasyukhin, director of the Ural Mountains foundry, told the Itar-Tass news agency.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer and Ruben Vives
One of the rare U.S. gold coins found in a cache discovered by a Northern California couple on their daily walk is the finest known coin of its type and valued around $1 million, experts said Wednesday. An 1866 $20 coin printed without the “In God We Trust” motto -- the 1866-S No Motto Double Eagle -- is the highest quality of its kind, said David Hall, cofounder of Professional Coin Grading Services in Irvine, who recently authenticated the coins. When the motto was added to the coin in 1866, some coins were still minted in San Francisco without the phrase, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Putting authors on currency is not a new thing. Benjamin Franklin, a founding father and author of “Poor Richard's Almanac,” is on the U.S. $100 bill, and in Chile the Nobel laureate and poet Gabriela Mistral graces the 5,000 peso bill, which is worth about $10. And Jane Austen will soon grace Britain's 10-pound note . But honoring a living writer on a bill or coin is relatively rare. Alice Munro, 82, who last year won the Nobel Prize for Literature, was actually at the ceremony on Monday in Victoria, Canada, (where she once owned a bookstore)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A senior expert at the firm representing a Northern California couple who discovered buried gold coins worth $10 million says he  has not received any credible claims to the huge find and does not expect to. Numerous theories have cropped up since the discovery of the Saddle Ridge Hoard was announced last week. One of them, that the coins were tied to  a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, appeared to be debunked Tuesday by the U.S. Mint itself. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | United Press International
Treasury Secretary James A. Baker III on Wednesday struck the first gold and silver coins commemorating the bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution. After a fife and drum corps played "Yankee Doodle," Baker struck the first silver memento on a coin press in the Philadelphia Mint. Then, with a computer hookup, he activated a gold coin press 130 miles away at West Point, N.Y. Donna Pope, director of the U.S.
NEWS
April 13, 1987
Rep. Frank Annunzio (D-Ill.) in a statement accused the U.S. Mint of selling millions of underweight half-ounce or smaller gold coins before quietly correcting the problem. But Mint Director Donna Pope called Annunzio's charge "an irresponsible distortion of the truth." For the first time in 50 years, the Mint last year began selling gold coins called Eagles in one-ounce, half-ounce, quarter-ounce and one-tenth of an ounce denominations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1991
Two days this week The Times has printed stories stating that U.S. paper money--bills--is "minted." To quote from "Big West Title Serves as Tark the Shark's Hors D'Oeuvre" (March 11): " . . . made of paper and minted in the U.S.A. . . . That's the money for winning the tournament." And the article "Dealer in Old Money Feels Aura of History in His Coins, Currency" (March 12) reports on John Fitzgerald's business of collecting and selling old money. The article indicates that Fitzgerald feels he's spreading the word about American history, pointing out that "each of the bills were minted while the country was growing up, and there is history attached to them each step of the way they were minted."
BUSINESS
April 5, 1987 | CARRIE BROWN
An anonymous American collector made the final bid of $140,000 to pick up a 2,200-year-old gold octodrachm, the most valuable of 961 ancient coins auctioned recently at the Bel Age hotel in West Hollywood. Zurich's Bank Leu dropped out of the international bidding at $135,000 for the one-of-a-kind piece, a Greek coin minted about 200 B.C. with the impression of King Antiochus of Syria. The octodrachm was probably cast to commemorate his succession to the throne of Alexander the Great.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Eryn Brown and Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists continue to celebrate the announcement Wednesday that in all probability, the long-sought Higgs boson - a.k.a. the “God particle” - has been detected at a European atom-smasher outside Geneva. For the physics community as a whole, it's a confirmation of its theories about why there is mass in the universe. For one particular physicist, it means that a payoff of rare chocolate coins is in the offing. In 2005, MIT physicists Frank Wilczek and Janet Conrad made a friendly wager.
WORLD
March 19, 2014 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Trying not to be penny-wise but pound-foolish, Britain announced Wednesday that it will ditch its venerable round 1-pound coin in favor of a new 12-sided model specially designed to foil counterfeiters. The new piece, to enter circulation in 2017, will maintain the nugget-like size of the current version, about the diameter of a U.S. nickel and nearly twice as heavy. But it will incorporate different-colored metals, for a faux gold and silver look, instead of the mostly copper blend now in circulation, and boast a high-tech anti-forgery feature used in paper money that remains shrouded in secrecy by the Royal Mint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Last year, a couple walking the usual route around their California Gold Country property happened upon a can sticking out of the ground. They pulled it out and uncovered seven others, all filled with hundreds of U.S. gold coins. Experts announced the find last month after a year of work researching and authenticating the 1,427 coins, worth an estimated $10 million. But the origin of the Saddle Ridge hoard remains a tantalizing mystery, one that has coin buffs and amateur sleuths on the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A senior expert at the firm representing a Northern California couple who discovered buried gold coins worth $10 million says he  has not received any credible claims to the huge find and does not expect to. Numerous theories have cropped up since the discovery of the Saddle Ridge Hoard was announced last week. One of them, that the coins were tied to  a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, appeared to be debunked Tuesday by the U.S. Mint itself. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
“Gold fever” is still alive, a California historian said after last week's discovery of more than 1,400 coins buried on a Northern California couple's gold country property. The historic find, believed to be the most valuable in North America, has had people around the world buzzing since the announcement by numismatic firm Kagin's Inc., which evaluated the hoard and is representing the couple. “There's something about gold, ever since the days of legendary King Midas, it's just incredible people's response to this,” said Gary Kurutz, director of special collections at the California State Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The news of a Northern California couple's discovery of more than 1,400 gold coins hidden on their property has experts, history buffs and regular folks speculating on the treasure's origin. Though officials said it is unlikely the coins were stolen in a turn-of-the-century theft at the U.S. Mint in San Francisco, some wonder if the cache could be one of many believed buried by the  Knights of the Golden Circle . The secretive, subversive Confederate group is thought to have hidden millions in ill-gotten gold across a dozen states to finance a second Civil War. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins The coins very well could be a fortune buried by a wealthy businessman, but the time period, markers near the cache and manner in which the coins were buried fit the mold of the KGC, said Warren Getler, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who coauthored “Rebel Gold,” a book about the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Gold coins worth $10 million that were discovered by a Northern California couple were not likely stolen in a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, an official said Tuesday. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter. In 1901, six bags of double eagle gold coins -- 250 $20 coins in each -- went missing from the San Francisco Mint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
A cache of 19th century gold coins uncovered by a California couple on their daily walk could end up selling for more than $10 million, making it the  greatest buried treasure ever unearthed in the United States, experts said. Donald Kagin, president of Kagin's Inc., a  numismatic firm that specializes in U.S. gold coins,  announced the discovery Tuesday. The company is representing the couple, who wish to remain anonymous. Identified by  the firm only as "John and Mary" , the couple told Kagin they couldn't believe they had made such a big discovery and were grateful for it. They unearthed the coins after noticing an  old can sticking out of the dirt on a section of their property, the firm said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
The California couple who found a buried cache of 19th century gold coins say they will use the proceeds -- which experts say could amount to more than $10 million -- to hold on to their home. The couple, identified by the firm representing them only as "John" and "Mary," made the find during one of their daily walks on their property in California's gold country. Eight of the rusty cans they dug up were filled with more than 1,400 rare and perfectly preserved U.S. gold coins dating from 1847 to 1894, according to Donald Kagin, president of Kagin's Inc., a numismatic firm that specializes in U.S. gold coins and represents the couple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | Samantha Schaefer
Ten paces north of the angular rock on a hill, a rusty can hangs from a tree that marks the spot. More than 100 years ago, someone chose the space below to stash away their fortune -- $28,000 in U.S. gold coins. They stayed concealed there, buried in eight tin cans, until John and Mary came upon them last year on their daily walk. They had struck gold. And when they realized it, the Northern California couple dug a hole in their wood pile, placed the 1,400 coins in bags and boxes in an old ice chest and buried them again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The California couple who stumbled on what may be the most valuable cache of gold coins ever found in North America were so taken aback that reburied them in an old ice chest until they could figure out their next step. That was the story relayed by John and Mary in an interview transcript posted by the  numismatic firm Kagin's Inc., which is representing the couple and keeping their identities confidential. The pair had walked the path on their Gold Country property for years before they spotted the edge of a rusty can peeking out of the moss last February, they told Kagin's.
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