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BUSINESS
December 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Coming soon on new presidential dollar coins -- Old Hickory, Old Kinderhook, Old Man Eloquent and the Last of the Cocked Hats. The U.S. Mint, maker of the nation's coins, today will unveil the stately images of the next four presidents whose faces will appear on the front of the shiny gold-colored dollar coins next year.
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NEWS
November 22, 2001 | MARISA SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's not much talk here these days about a surplus, except for the surplus of coins in circulation. And because there are so many pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters changing hands, the U.S. Mint has announced that 357 people, about 12% of its work force, are losing their jobs, with the San Francisco plant especially hard hit. Last year the Mint made about 25 billion new coins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The co-owner of a Glendale coin shop is responsible for the recovery of nearly $500,000 in rare silver and gold coins stolen more than a year ago from a Long Beach coin show, and the arrest of a suspect in the theft, authorities said. Robert Van Bebber recognized the coins Monday when some of them were brought into his Coin and Stamp Galleries by a man attempting to sell them, police said. Thomas J.
NEWS
December 26, 2000 | Associated Press
The Salvation Army has struck gold three times in recent weeks. The Salvation Army's Jonathan Harvey was elated when he learned that someone had dropped a valuable gold coin into a donation kettle. And just after he auctioned off that coin Thursday and earned the organization $575, his phone rang. Another of the group's bell-ringers had found a gold coin in his kettle. With the second coin was a note indicating there would be another coin in another kettle. And so there was, Harvey said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1996
Two thieves made away with nearly $400 in rare coins and jewelry during a robbery Saturday in a yogurt shop parking lot, police said. The incident occurred about noon while the victim, an adult male, was inside the Golden Spoon yogurt shop on Harbor Boulevard. Two men broke into the victim's car and attempted to steal a briefcase containing $4,800 in collectible coins, jewelry and currency, said Costa Mesa police Sgt. Les Gogerty.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A customer of SafraBank California in Encino was free on bail Thursday after being arrested for allegedly using counterfeit gold coins to defraud the bank of $13.4 million. Tzyy Bin Chen, of Queens, N.Y., was arrested by the FBI in New York on Wednesday but pleaded innocent to the charges at an arraignment. He was released after bail was set at $3 million with a $50,000 cash security payment, said Assistant U.S. Atty. Peter K. Vigeland. Chen's lawyer, Paul P. Rao Jr.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1988 | From Associated Press
Advocates of redesigning the nation's pennies, nickels dimes and quarters have held out the prospect that excited coin collectors would hand the Treasury a multibillion-dollar, deficit-reducing, windfall profit. But the director of the U.S. Mint, testifying in late April before the Senate Banking Committee, predicted only small-change proceeds ranging in the millions of dollars, not billions. Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) said any profit from a redesigned coin would be welcome.
NEWS
May 21, 1999 | From the Washington Post
The $1 Susan B. Anthony coin that Americans rejected 20 years ago is staging a comeback. U.S. Mint officials announced Thursday that they will strike an undetermined number of the coins later this year because the mint's stockpiles of coins carrying the suffragette's image will be exhausted before a new gold-colored $1 coin can be introduced in January. The old coins were struck from 1979 to 1981 and were one of the biggest disasters in recent U.S. coinage.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hannes Tulving Rare Coin Investments--under investigation by federal and state authorities for allegedly overpricing coins and reneging on guarantees--has recently sold nearly all of its assets in order to stay in business, the company's owner said Thursday. Until recently Tulving was one of the nation's largest coin dealers, selling more than $30 million in coins to more than 4,600 clients last year alone.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Trade Commission on Wednesday placed Hannes Tulving Rare Coin Investment, one of the nation's biggest coin dealers, into receivership and is expected to file a civil complaint today charging the firm with overpricing. In a separate case, sources said the FTC is investigating Professional Coin Grading Service in Irvine, the industry's largest appraiser, on allegations it graded some coins at rates favorable to its preferred customers.
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