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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014
The Northern California couple who found rare gold coins in eight tin cans buried on their property said they will donate some of the proceeds to charity. John and Mary came upon the $28,000 in U.S. gold coins last year on their daily walk. When they realized what they had found, they dug a hole in their wood pile, placed the 1,400 coins in bags and boxes in an old ice chest and buried them again. The pair had walked the path on their gold country property for years before they spotted the edge of a rusty can peeking out of the moss last February.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
The California couple who found a buried cache of 19th century gold coins say they will use the proceeds -- which experts say could amount to more than $10 million -- to hold on to their home. The couple, identified by the firm representing them only as "John" and "Mary," made the find during one of their daily walks on their property in California's gold country. Eight of the rusty cans they dug up were filled with more than 1,400 rare and perfectly preserved U.S. gold coins dating from 1847 to 1894, according to Donald Kagin, president of Kagin's Inc., a numismatic firm that specializes in U.S. gold coins and represents the couple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
A cache of 19th century gold coins uncovered by a California couple on their daily walk could end up selling for more than $10 million, making it the  greatest buried treasure ever unearthed in the United States, experts said. Donald Kagin, president of Kagin's Inc., a  numismatic firm that specializes in U.S. gold coins,  announced the discovery Tuesday. The company is representing the couple, who wish to remain anonymous. Identified by  the firm only as "John and Mary" , the couple told Kagin they couldn't believe they had made such a big discovery and were grateful for it. They unearthed the coins after noticing an  old can sticking out of the dirt on a section of their property, the firm said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
For many years, John and Mary took daily walks along a trail on a section of their property they nicknamed Saddle Ridge.   But last year , as they were walking their dog, they noticed an old can sticking out of the dirt. Curious, they brushed away some moss, used a stick to dig it out and carried the heavy container home. And that's all it took for the couple living in California's gold country to discover a cache of 19 th -century U.S. gold coins that rare coin experts say is the greatest buried treasure ever unearthed in the United States.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - To lawmakers and others arguing that replacing the $1 bill with a $1 coin would save the government money, the Federal Reserve says, "Don't bet on it. " A new analysis by Fed staffers said the old-fashioned greenback is more durable than people realize and replacing it with a $1 coin, which is more expensive to produce, would cost the government $1.2 billion over 30 years. "Based on our analysis of the benefits and costs of a currency-to-coin transition, we believe that the $1 Federal Reserve note should remain in circulation and not be replaced with a $1 coin," concluded the authors of a Fed staff working paper released this week.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- To lawmakers and others arguing that replacing the $1 bill with a $1 coin would save the government money, the Federal Reserve says, “Don't bet on it.” A new analysis by Fed staffers said the old-fashioned greenback is more durable than people realize and replacing it with a $1 coin, which is more expensive to produce, would cost the government $1.2 billion over 30 years. "Based on our analysis of the benefits and costs of a currency-to-coin transition, we believe that the $1 Federal Reserve note should remain in circulation and not be replaced with a $1 coin," concluded the authors of a Fed staff working paper released this week.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Coin is making waves on the Web by promising to slim down consumers' fat wallets by replacing their credit and debit cards with a single card that can be used for purchases. The San Francisco startup began taking pre-orders for its smartcard at noon Thursday and within 40 minutes the company reached its crowdfunding goal of $50,000. As explained in the video above, Coin is an electronic card holding all of the users' credit and debit card information. Before making a payment, users choose which card they want to use by pressing a button on the Coin card.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Before being removed from the Apple App Store and Google Play, an app called InstLike duped Instagram users into sharing their login information with the app in order to gain 'likes' and followers, a report said. The app asked users to share their Instagram username and password, all the while reassuring users that it would not misuse the information. But once users shared the information, InstLike turned accounts into digital zombies that would follow other InstLike users who had paid to gain followers and 'likes' for their photos.
SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 There was a three-way tie for third place in the Trinity League between Servite, Orange Lutheran and JSerra. Coin flips were held, and Servite was given third place, Orange Lutheran fourth and JSerra fifth. Servite is definitely in the Pac-5 playoffs. Orange Lutheran and JSerra will have to battle Crespi for the two at-large berths. Here's the criteria: Head-to-head competition (four points); overall strength of the league (one point); overall win-loss record (one point); strength against common opponents (one point)
SPORTS
November 7, 2013 | Sam Farmer
The last time Cam Cleeland had two good eyes, a pillowcase was being pulled over his head. It was 15 years ago in a University of Wisconsin La Crosse dormitory that housed New Orleans Saints players for training camp. Cleeland and his fellow rookies were herded at one end of a long, narrow hallway. Their veteran teammates, most of them drunk, lined either side of the hall, leaving about a one-foot gap to get through. This was the gantlet, a well-worn Saints tradition of hazing and a rite of passage for the rookies.
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