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OPINION
July 23, 2002
Re "Despite Skeptics and Critics, Cryonics May Be a Cool Way to Go," Commentary, July 19: People who believe that a man who had died can be revived by cloning his cryonically preserved cells overlook the fact that the personality does not reside in the DNA. Identical twins are perfect clones of each other, yet they are not the same person and sometimes are exact opposites. When a body is cloned, the spiritual being inhabiting that body is not part of the package. Michael O'Brien Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 1, 2012 | Chris Foster
Receivers Taylor Embree and Nelson Rosario closed their UCLA careers by catching touchdown passes in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl on Saturday. It wasn't satisfying, as the Bruins lost to Illinois, 20-14. "In the future, I can always say that I scored in a bowl game," Embree said. "What I wanted more than anything was to end my career with a win. " Embree caught a 16-yard touchdown pass from Kevin Prince, giving UCLA a 7-0 lead with 10 minutes left in the first half. It was his only reception.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1991
The name Charles H. Keating Jr. should live on to warn against Main Street spinning out of control the way Wall Street did in the 1980s. Because in the 1990s, the wheeling and dealing crashed with a vengeance on Keating--and, unfortunately, on the rest of the nation. The Phoenix financier and speculator was convicted by a Los Angeles jury Wednesday of state securities fraud in the sale of $250 million worth of junk bonds at his Orange County-based Lincoln Savings & Loan.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2010
"Get Low" is one of those fine character studies that is blessed with good characters and even better actors to bring them to life. Set in the hills of Tennessee during the '30s, it swirls around a legendary recluse played by Robert Duvall, who decides he wants to stage his own funeral. Bill Murray is a sly shyster of a funeral director more than happy to take his money and Lucas Black is his much better No. 2. Sissy Spacek has lingering affections and a bitter grudge toward the old codger that she's still working through.
FOOD
July 1, 1990
While it is totally untrue that we caused last week's hot spell to publicize this Cold Foods issue, we do take some pride in having foreseen that from June on, the weather around here gets warmish. You wouldn't want to eat hot food in this weather, but you certainly wouldn't want to be bored in it either. Since the summer bids to be long and at least pretty hot, here is a budget of surprises: things you might not expect to eat cold.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Ask a few surfers about the genesis of the wet suit. Chances are they will credit clever surfers. They may tell you surfers tried greased sweat shirts, old cashmere sweaters, plastic-coated foam suits; then an intrepid surfer discovered neoprene rubber. The truth, however, may be a little different. Many say the first neoprene wet suit was developed in a laboratory at UC Berkeley. A physicist, now living in La Jolla, built a prototype of the suit that revolutionized our relationship to the sea.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2007 | Avital Binshtock,, Special to The Times
Sure, we all live in L.A. for the sunshine. But that's hard to remember when the mercury blasts past the point at which you can fry an egg on the sidewalk. Suddenly, all you want is a quick getaway to somewhere very, very cool. Better yet, glacially cold. Only thing is, you're fresh out of ideas -- and possibly money. No worries. Here are some nearby places to chill out, whether or not you have cold, hard cash.
FOOD
July 1, 1990 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's never too hot for bouillabaisse. When the temperature gets out of hand, you simply eat it cold. The idea comes from Michael Hutchings of Michael's Waterside in Santa Barbara, who makes a chilly version that is molded like a salad. Hutching's soup is not for quick-and-easy cooks. The procedures aren't difficult, but they require time and patience. An expert like Hutchings can prepare a rich fish aspic that sets naturally or with a little help from leaf gelatin, which most of us can't obtain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2005 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
On a remote beach north of Santa Barbara it's the end of a perfect winter day: A bright blue sky darkens as the orange orb of the sun plunges into the mirror-like ocean. In the distance, two figures approach, seeming to emerge out of the landscape itself: a woman and a dog. The animal is a stubby Australian cattle dog, a squat thing, close to the earth. The woman is Gretel Ehrlich, herself elemental -- long, blond-cum-gray hair; sharp, bright eyes; a face as weathered as driftwood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1989
Regarding the unwelcome appearance on Irvine walls of the ugliest of all of man's graphic efforts, the ubiquitous graffiti; may I offer to the good citizens of that community an Italian phrase that just might offer them solace: "Muraglia bianca, carta di matto." That translates as: "The white wall is the fool's paper." Cold comfort, I admit, but better than nothing. THOMAS M. VIZE Santa Ana
OPINION
October 31, 2009
As the first doses of swine flu vaccine were made available this month, it looked as though the public might be scared away from inoculations by the chatter of such disparate anti-vacciners as Bill Maher and Rush Limbaugh. Now, of course, the opposite has happened: People are lining up at clinics and pestering their doctors for the vaccine, which is 12 million doses short of recent predictions. The country has about a fifth of what's needed to inoculate its most vulnerable populations.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2007 | Avital Binshtock,, Special to The Times
Sure, we all live in L.A. for the sunshine. But that's hard to remember when the mercury blasts past the point at which you can fry an egg on the sidewalk. Suddenly, all you want is a quick getaway to somewhere very, very cool. Better yet, glacially cold. Only thing is, you're fresh out of ideas -- and possibly money. No worries. Here are some nearby places to chill out, whether or not you have cold, hard cash.
SPORTS
December 19, 2005 | Steve Springer, Times Staff Writer
It was a night for bears. Polar bears. And Chicago Bears. The temperature dropped to 8 below zero with the wind-chill factor Sunday night at Soldier Field, but the night could not have been better for the Bears.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005 | Nancy Ramsey, Special to The Times
A dozen years ago, Luc Jacquet, then a master's student of biology in Lyon, France, answered a classified ad for a "fearless biologist, ready to spend fourteen months at the end of the world." "I knew nothing about Antarctica or about penguins," says the director of "March of the Penguins," which opened Friday. But after his first stay, Jacquet returned again and again, filming the harsh continent's wildlife and landscape. And it was the penguins that particularly captured his imagination.
NEWS
February 10, 2004 | Charles Duhigg
As the nurse peels back bloody gauze on the leg sliced by a loose ski, radiologists down the hall at Tahoe Forest Hospital are confirming their fourth fracture on a Saturday that will see 53. A few miles away, a blond 6-year-old scrambles atop an inner tube. When the tube won't go, she rocks it, urging speed. At last, trees blur by and she's out of control. The tube careens to the right and the girl tumbles off, immediately starting to cry.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2010
"Get Low" is one of those fine character studies that is blessed with good characters and even better actors to bring them to life. Set in the hills of Tennessee during the '30s, it swirls around a legendary recluse played by Robert Duvall, who decides he wants to stage his own funeral. Bill Murray is a sly shyster of a funeral director more than happy to take his money and Lucas Black is his much better No. 2. Sissy Spacek has lingering affections and a bitter grudge toward the old codger that she's still working through.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000
The outrageous arrogance and hypocrisy of the "freedom-loving" people who now hold Elian Gonzalez hostage is enough to take one's breath away. And given the shameless exploitation of this unfortunate child by his new "family," their numerous broken promises to hand him over to his father, as well as their disregard for the rule of law, combined with the systemic corruption and pervasive lawlessness of south Florida, I can only conclude that Elian will...
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