Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCold War History
IN THE NEWS

Cold War History

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the mid-1960s, and U.S. B-52s were pummeling North Vietnam. In the port of Haiphong, a prime bombing target, the Vietnamese devised a novel means of defense: the bodies of Soviet sailors. Transforming citizens of their main ally into unwitting human shields, the Vietnamese intentionally stalled the unloading of Soviet freighters in the belief that as long as the Russians were in port, the U.S. Air Force would be loath to attack.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 11, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States returned the Rhein-Main air base to Germany, ending a 60-year chapter of Cold War history with a brass band ceremony on the runway. The base, a hub for U.S. forces in Europe since the end of World War II, will be officially handed over to the Frankfurt airport at the end of the year. The airstrip was used to keep West Berlin supplied during the 1948 Soviet blockade.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Claudia "Sue" Powers, widow of downed U-2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers and an advocate of preserving Cold War history, died June 17 in Las Vegas of respiratory failure. She was 68. She was a CIA psychometrist who tested agents returning from abroad when she met Powers in 1962 after his release from a Soviet prison. Powers' U-2 was shot down on May 1, 1960, as he flew over Soviet airspace, and after parachuting out of the plane he was captured and convicted of espionage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Claudia "Sue" Powers, widow of downed U-2 spy plane pilot Francis Gary Powers and an advocate of preserving Cold War history, died June 17 in Las Vegas of respiratory failure. She was 68. She was a CIA psychometrist who tested agents returning from abroad when she met Powers in 1962 after his release from a Soviet prison. Powers' U-2 was shot down on May 1, 1960, as he flew over Soviet airspace, and after parachuting out of the plane he was captured and convicted of espionage.
WORLD
October 11, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States returned the Rhein-Main air base to Germany, ending a 60-year chapter of Cold War history with a brass band ceremony on the runway. The base, a hub for U.S. forces in Europe since the end of World War II, will be officially handed over to the Frankfurt airport at the end of the year. The airstrip was used to keep West Berlin supplied during the 1948 Soviet blockade.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their grandfathers' argument in a mock-up of an American kitchen made Cold War history. Now the grandson of President Richard Nixon and a granddaughter of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev sat side by side Sunday, 36 years to the day after Nixon had predicted in a speech that Khrushchev's grandchildren would live in freedom. "Nixon was right and Khrushchev was wrong," Nina Khrushcheva, 32, told the crowd gathered at the Nixon Library & Birthplace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their grandfathers' argument in a mock-up of an American kitchen made Cold War history. Now the grandson of President Richard Nixon and a granddaughter of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev sat side-by-side Sunday, 36 years to the day after Nixon had predicted in a speech that Khrushchev's grandchildren would live in freedom. "Nixon was right and Khrushchev was wrong," Nina Khrushcheva told the crowd gathered at the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace on Sunday.
NEWS
March 20, 1995 | JIM MANN
With the end of the Cold War, the world has begun to glean from the former Soviet and East German archives all sorts of new information about the history of the past 40 years. The opening of the Soviet records in Moscow, for example, has demonstrated Josef Stalin and Mao Tse-tung's complicity in the North Korean invasion that started the Korean War. We have learned, too, that the tiny Communist Party in the United States was subsidized by Moscow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY
Three descendants of key Cold War politicians gathered in a small meeting room Monday to share personal remembrances with UC Irvine political science students and bring to life a recent era that many young people have already dismissed as ancient history. David Eisenhower, grandson of President Dwight Eisenhower; his wife, Julie Nixon Eisenhower, daughter of President Richard Nixon; and Sergei N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990 | PATT MORRISON and PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Folks, you may have caught the act during its long-running engagement, 28 years in Berlin, and now it's here, in Ventura County. Ladies and gentlemen, let's say "Ich bin ein Venturer," and give a big Simi Valley welcome to a big performer: the concrete you love to hate--the Berlin Wall!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1997 | LEE ROMNEY
Three descendants of key Cold War politicians gathered in a small meeting room Monday to share personal remembrances with UC Irvine political science students and bring to life a recent era that many young people have already dismissed as ancient history. David Eisenhower, grandson of President Dwight Eisenhower; his wife, Julie Nixon Eisenhower, daughter of President Richard Nixon; and Sergei N.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | MARION LLOYD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Might or right: It's a decades-old debate on this island of white sand beaches that doubles as the only remaining bombing range in the Atlantic. "We're living in a war zone," complains Gilberto Clark, a nature guide. The U.S. Navy occupies two-thirds of Vieques, leaving residents only the middle strip of this 21- by 4-mile island off Puerto Rico's eastern coast. American troops have used it to prepare for every military engagement since 1941, when the government bought the land for $1.4 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their grandfathers' argument in a mock-up of an American kitchen made Cold War history. Now the grandson of President Richard Nixon and a granddaughter of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev sat side-by-side Sunday, 36 years to the day after Nixon had predicted in a speech that Khrushchev's grandchildren would live in freedom. "Nixon was right and Khrushchev was wrong," Nina Khrushcheva told the crowd gathered at the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace on Sunday.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their grandfathers' argument in a mock-up of an American kitchen made Cold War history. Now the grandson of President Richard Nixon and a granddaughter of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev sat side by side Sunday, 36 years to the day after Nixon had predicted in a speech that Khrushchev's grandchildren would live in freedom. "Nixon was right and Khrushchev was wrong," Nina Khrushcheva, 32, told the crowd gathered at the Nixon Library & Birthplace.
NEWS
March 20, 1995 | JIM MANN
With the end of the Cold War, the world has begun to glean from the former Soviet and East German archives all sorts of new information about the history of the past 40 years. The opening of the Soviet records in Moscow, for example, has demonstrated Josef Stalin and Mao Tse-tung's complicity in the North Korean invasion that started the Korean War. We have learned, too, that the tiny Communist Party in the United States was subsidized by Moscow.
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin spent almost five hours Monday with Prime Minister John Major, forging closer ties with Britain and "consigning the Cold War to history." The two leaders signed the first Anglo-Russian friendship treaty since 1766 as Major promised Yeltsin more British aid.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the mid-1960s, and U.S. B-52s were pummeling North Vietnam. In the port of Haiphong, a prime bombing target, the Vietnamese devised a novel means of defense: the bodies of Soviet sailors. Transforming citizens of their main ally into unwitting human shields, the Vietnamese intentionally stalled the unloading of Soviet freighters in the belief that as long as the Russians were in port, the U.S. Air Force would be loath to attack.
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin spent almost five hours Monday with Prime Minister John Major, forging closer ties with Britain and "consigning the Cold War to history." The two leaders signed the first Anglo-Russian friendship treaty since 1766 as Major promised Yeltsin more British aid.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|