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Colfax Avenue Elementary School

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991
After all the months of reporting in The Times that the southern end of North Hollywood is now Valley Village, why does The Times insist on reporting in other news stories that it is North Hollywood? Example: In the May 26 edition, in the Sunday Real Estate section column "Hot Property," it was stated that Garfields Production Co. was moving from Toluca Lake to North Hollywood, at Laurel Canyon and Chandler boulevards. Two days later, in the Metro section, you reported the break-in at Colfax Avenue Elementary School in North Hollywood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1994
My son Zachary just graduated from Colfax Avenue Elementary School in North Hollywood. Not only did this complete his seven-year sojourn there, but it marked the end of 14 consecutive years during which at least one of our three children attended Colfax. When our daughter attended Colfax in the early '80s, it appeared that she was the only child for blocks around in our neighborhood who attended the local public school. Those were times of busing controversies and labor strife within the public schools.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1994
My son Zachary just graduated from Colfax Avenue Elementary School in North Hollywood. Not only did this complete his seven-year sojourn there, but it marked the end of 14 consecutive years during which at least one of our three children attended Colfax. When our daughter attended Colfax in the early '80s, it appeared that she was the only child for blocks around in our neighborhood who attended the local public school. Those were times of busing controversies and labor strife within the public schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a promise that Shirley DiRado, principal at Colfax Avenue Elementary School, knew she couldn't wiggle out of. Six weeks ago, she vowed to eat a live worm in front of students who read at least two books in this year's Read-a-Thon. On Friday, it was time to pay up as about 350 students--more than half the school's population-packed the auditorium to see if DiRado would really do it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a promise that Shirley DiRado, principal at Colfax Avenue Elementary School, knew she couldn't wiggle out of. Six weeks ago, she vowed to eat a live worm in front of students who read at least two books in this year's Read-a-Thon. On Friday, it was time to pay up as about 350 students--more than half the school's population-packed the auditorium to see if DiRado would really do it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1991 | CAROL McGRAW and PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two 12-year-old boys and a 14-year-old girl were arrested Wednesday after a woman told police her children were responsible for a $27,000 vandalism rampage that left a North Hollywood elementary school a shambles. The children, including the woman's son and daughter, were once students at Colfax Avenue Elementary School and apparently vandalized the school because one of the boys held a grudge, Los Angeles police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1991 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colfax Avenue Elementary School teacher Marcia Weiss tearfully surveyed the destruction wreaked on her school early Tuesday by vandals. Desks were overturned, a dozen computers smashed, carpets drenched with green paint, windows shattered, piles of textbooks soaked with orange juice, holes punched through ceiling tiles, and students' artwork torn to shreds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As summer settles over Colfax Avenue School, the sounds of children playing have been replaced by the echoes of hammers and the hum of an electric paint sprayer. A month after vandals trashed 17 rooms at the North Hollywood school and caused $37,000 in damage, an army of parents, students and teachers has converged to refurbish wrecked classrooms. "When school reopens in August, things will be pretty much as they were," Colfax administrator Donnie McNeal said hopefully.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Matthew Notarianni was afraid to go to sleep after his first-grade classroom at Colfax Avenue School was wrecked by vandals. Scared that whoever ripped apart 17 classrooms over Memorial Day weekend might strike at his house, the 7-year-old did not want to close his eyes at night, lest he be caught off guard. "I thought it was weird," Matthew said about the destruction wrought by vandals at his North Hollywood school. "Most kids were afraid. I couldn't believe that this could happen."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As summer settles over Colfax Avenue School, the sounds of children playing have been replaced by the echoes of hammers and the hum of an electric paint sprayer. A month after vandals trashed 17 rooms at the North Hollywood school and caused $37,000 in damage, an army of parents, students and teachers has converged to refurbish wrecked classrooms. "When school reopens in August, things will be pretty much as they were," Colfax administrator Donnie McNeal said hopefully.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Matthew Notarianni was afraid to go to sleep after his first-grade classroom at Colfax Avenue School was wrecked by vandals. Scared that whoever ripped apart 17 classrooms over Memorial Day weekend might strike at his house, the 7-year-old did not want to close his eyes at night, lest he be caught off guard. "I thought it was weird," Matthew said about the destruction wrought by vandals at his North Hollywood school. "Most kids were afraid. I couldn't believe that this could happen."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991
After all the months of reporting in The Times that the southern end of North Hollywood is now Valley Village, why does The Times insist on reporting in other news stories that it is North Hollywood? Example: In the May 26 edition, in the Sunday Real Estate section column "Hot Property," it was stated that Garfields Production Co. was moving from Toluca Lake to North Hollywood, at Laurel Canyon and Chandler boulevards. Two days later, in the Metro section, you reported the break-in at Colfax Avenue Elementary School in North Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1991 | CAROL McGRAW and PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two 12-year-old boys and a 14-year-old girl were arrested Wednesday after a woman told police her children were responsible for a $27,000 vandalism rampage that left a North Hollywood elementary school a shambles. The children, including the woman's son and daughter, were once students at Colfax Avenue Elementary School and apparently vandalized the school because one of the boys held a grudge, Los Angeles police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1991 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colfax Avenue Elementary School teacher Marcia Weiss tearfully surveyed the destruction wreaked on her school early Tuesday by vandals. Desks were overturned, a dozen computers smashed, carpets drenched with green paint, windows shattered, piles of textbooks soaked with orange juice, holes punched through ceiling tiles, and students' artwork torn to shreds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1991
Events involving past and present students of Walter Reed Junior High in North Hollywood have brought shock, horror and disbelief to the student body as well as the community. The killing of a former Reed student at Millikan Junior High was followed within days by the vandalism at Colfax Avenue Elementary School by three Reed students. Unnoticed and unreported, there was another significant event involving Reed students over the Memorial Day weekend. Over 100 students, the Reed senior orchestra and the Reed choir, chartered buses and spent the weekend in San Diego to compete in a music festival at their own expense, the only junior high among 16 high schools competing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991
Burglars vandalized five classrooms in a Canoga Park elementary school over the weekend, forcing some classes to be held in the school library, the school's principal said Tuesday. It was the latest in a series of break-ins and burglaries at San Fernando Valley schools. Fire extinguishers were sprayed over walls and floors, desks were ransacked and paint was splattered, causing an estimated $5,000 in damage at Hart Street Elementary School, said Principal Diana Villafana.
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