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Colin Firth

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NEWS
December 2, 2009 | By Tina Daunt
Colin Firth first came to international attention as Mr. Darcy, the thinking woman's sex object in "Pride & Prejudice," and then as Bridget Jones' slightly dazed consort, conspicuously named Mark Darcy. But the role of his life may be as George Falconer, the main character in Tom Ford's adaptation of the 1964 novel "A Single Man" by Christopher Isherwood. FOR THE RECORD: Colin Firth: In an article last week about Colin Firth and the film "A Single Man," the name of painter Don Bachardy was misspelled as Bacardi.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
An alternately delicate and brutal retelling of the memoir by former World War II British Army officer Eric Lomax, "The Railway Man" is an impressively crafted, skillfully acted, highly absorbing journey into a dark corner of world history. Colin Firth plays Lomax in 1980, more than 35 years after being tortured at a Japanese labor camp in Thailand. He learns that Takashi Nagase, the Japanese interpreter at the helm of that cruel, unforgettable punishment, is still alive. Lomax will eventually cross continents to confront his erstwhile captor and hopefully quell the post-traumatic stress disorder that has plagued the self-dubbed "railway enthusiast" for decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York ? Colin Firth, playing a monarch with a debilitating stutter in "The King's Speech," found something unusual happening during shooting: He began experiencing symptoms in parts of his body not associated with speaking. "At the end of some days on set I would get headaches, and a few times I did something weird to the nerves in my left arm and couldn't move it. I still don't know what it was," Firth said of his leading part in the highly anticipated royals drama, which opens in Los Angeles on Friday.
HOME & GARDEN
March 28, 2014 | By Amy Helmes
Approaching self-declared spinsterhood, I blamed Jane Austen. Having read all her novels and watched achingly gorgeous film adaptations thereof, I would consider only men who epitomized one of those gallant and stouthearted Regency-era heroes (barring the breeches and riding jackets because, well, I had to be realistic). Yet here was the sad but universal truth: If Jane Austen couldn't find a suitable mate in her day and age - she never married - there was no way in hell I'd ever find my "Mr. Darcy" in L.A., of all places.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Remember the moment in the 1995 BBC adaptation of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" when Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy emerges from the water? Swimmers in London's Serpentine Lake have a large-scale reminder of the brooding and dashing Darcy -- soaked shirt and all. In another example of art meets advertising, a 12-foot fiberglass sculpture was installed Monday to re-create the scene. The piece, which took a team of three two months to complete, was mostly modeled after Firth (see the signature sideburns)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Tommy Lee Jones as Gen. Douglas MacArthur; Colin Firth as a loser golfer and Nick Cassavetes' meditation on drugs and modern society are just a few of the new movie treats added to the packed slate at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival. Announced Tuesday morning, TIFF revealed a handful of world premieres to bow at the northern festival, set to begin Sept. 6. Jones stars opposite Matthew Fox in "The Emperor," a film from Peter Webber ("Girl With a Pearl Earring") that centers on the American occupation of Japan following World War II. WATCH: 5 trailers from TIFF to get you in the mood Firth will play a failed golf pro in the offbeat love story "Arthur Newman," a story about a loser who is so distraught with his current life that he fakes his own death and creates a new identity for himself.
NEWS
October 27, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
British actor Colin Firth plays a completely convincing stutterer as King George VI in the upcoming film "The King’s Speech" -- at least that’s the opinion of someone who could have been one of his harshest critics. Norbert Lieckfeldt, head of the British Stammering Assn. , and Firth discuss stuttering and the movie in which King George VI, who unexpectedly took the throne in 1936 after his older brother abdicated, works doggedly with a speech therapist. Here’s an excerpt from the conversation posted on the association's website: (Lieckfeldt)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
- When Emily Blunt was in grade school and Colin Firth was still a struggling actor, Becky Johnston was penning their characters in the first draft of a screenplay that would become "Arthur Newman. " Twenty years later, it is finally a movie, opening Friday, a meditation on identity guised in a road trip featuring two lost souls grappling with their unenviable realities. FOR THE RECORD: "Arthur Newman": An article about the film "Arthur Newman" in the April 24 Calendar section said that the movie was the first that Colin Firth signed onto after winning an Oscar for "The King's Speech.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Learn another language, live in a different body ? that's fundamentally what "The King's Speech" required of Colin Firth if he was to give the stammering King George VI an authenticity that could be sensed in every tortured sentence he delivered. Stuttering isn't just a twisted tongue, but a range of complex emotional issues that take hold of the entire body. In Firth, we had someone always in command of the rebellion. In taking on the reluctant British monarch, the actor tied himself up in knots in such exacting ways that we became as lost in the struggle as he did. The effect was a kind of exquisite pain, leaving us to bear witness as the words refused to come, as the shame and guilt of every failure seeped in. At times, I had to cap my hand over my mouth not to shout out whatever was eluding him. We can thank screenwriter David Seidler for creating that tongue-twisting gantlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1987 | BART MILLS
There's no nostalgia like show business nostalgia. Of all nationalities, the English are most apt to shed a tear over dimly remembered performances, long-dead stage giants, even vanished theaters themselves. "Lost Empires," the seven-part costume drama now running on public television's "Masterpiece Theatre" on Sunday nights, taps directly into England's longing for the era when all the world was an English stage. Based on a 1965 autobiographical novel by that supreme nostalgist J. B.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
LAS VEGAS - With "Gone Girl," 20th Century Fox previewed one of the most hotly anticipated releases of the year at CinemaCon on Thursday. But it was one of the studio's least-talked-about projects that got the warmest audience reaction. After unveiling a brief first look at "Girl," David Fincher's adaptation of Gillian Flynn's bestselling mystery novel starring Ben Affleck, the studio's chairman and CEO Jim Gianopulos surprised exhibitors by introducing a clip from "Secret Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
TORONTO -- As much as I love challenging films, I'm not sure I would recommend starting the day with “The Railway Man,” with Colin Firth as a British World War II vet suffering serious post traumatic stress disorder, and ending it at midnight with an emaciated Matthew McConaughey in “Dallas Buyers Club,” as a good ol' Texas boy diagnosed in the first wave of the AIDS crisis. But I did. It's the blessing and the curse of film festivals packed with tons of intriguing movies and tight schedules.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Remember the moment in the 1995 BBC adaptation of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" when Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy emerges from the water? Swimmers in London's Serpentine Lake have a large-scale reminder of the brooding and dashing Darcy -- soaked shirt and all. In another example of art meets advertising, a 12-foot fiberglass sculpture was installed Monday to re-create the scene. The piece, which took a team of three two months to complete, was mostly modeled after Firth (see the signature sideburns)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When Jane Austen wrote "Pride and Prejudice," she didn't imagine a sexy Mr. Darcy emerging from a pond in a dripping-wet white shirt. Yet thanks to the filmmakers behind the 1995 miniseries of the novel, viewers got to see Colin Firth, as Darcy, do exactly that . Firth was such a perfect Mr. Darcy that it's easy to believe Austen herself would have been smitten by him. But would she be as taken with a new sculpture memorializing that scene?...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Melancholy and middle America aren't usually seen in the rom-com world. In "Arthur Newman," a romantic comedy that unfolds during a road trip to Terra Haute, Ind., they are refreshingly unexpected elements that soften us up for the rough patches the film hits along the way. Also working in the film's favor are Colin Firth and Emily Blunt, both well-versed in comedy and about as appealing on screen as actors come. They star as a couple of depressed souls whose paths cross one night at the edge of a seedy motel swimming pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
- When Emily Blunt was in grade school and Colin Firth was still a struggling actor, Becky Johnston was penning their characters in the first draft of a screenplay that would become "Arthur Newman. " Twenty years later, it is finally a movie, opening Friday, a meditation on identity guised in a road trip featuring two lost souls grappling with their unenviable realities. FOR THE RECORD: "Arthur Newman": An article about the film "Arthur Newman" in the April 24 Calendar section said that the movie was the first that Colin Firth signed onto after winning an Oscar for "The King's Speech.
NEWS
February 7, 2011
The MPAA may not have liked it, but there are signs that Colin Firth's therapeutic, stream-of-expletives breakthrough in "The King's Speech" might be entering the lexicon. In the film, Geoffrey Rush's speech therapist, Lionel Logue, encourages Firth's Duke of York to fashion an F-bomb-laden tongue-twister in order to help beat a lifelong stammer. The blue torrent earned the movie an R rating, though that might be forgotten in the future as the scene becomes emblematic of humanity's greatest fear: public speaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Helen Mirren, Oscar winner for her performance in 2007's "The Queen," was queen for a day in Hollywood on Thursday, receiving the 2,488th star on the Walk of Fame.  She even had a king to attend to her in her new home. "The 'queen's' star," said Leron Gubler, Hollywood Chamber of Commerce president and chief exec, "is located right next to that of the 'king,' Colin Firth. We've kind of made this, in front of the Pig 'N Whistle, we've kind of made this a Brit location. " PHOTOS: Celebrity portraits by The Times After a few words from director Jon Turteltaub, writer-director David Mamet and Councilman Tom LaBonge, the droll Ms. Mirren had a few words of her own, captured on video by the chamber.
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