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July 20, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
This may be the information age, but more specifically, it's the mash-up moment.  Images, sounds, words -- all are retrieved instantly from our collective digital memory bank by artists and advertisers alike, shaken, stirred and spilled back out. In the day when collage really did involve scissors and glue, the discontinuities it invoked had more power to jolt and disarm. Think Höch and Heartfield. Now, makers are mixers and the visual fabric of the everyday is a busy, buzzing patchwork.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Matjames Metson's Silver Lake studio is in a 1930s Art Deco duplex perched atop a steep flight of aging, concrete stairs overlooking a cul-de-sac, which overlooks a hillside, which overlooks a bustling intersection that, from above, appears to be teeming with tiny toy cars and action-figure people. Inside, Metson's dusty, sunlit living room-turned-art studio is also full of tiny treasures. The assemblage artist builds intricate, architectural sculptures, wall hangings and furniture made from his abundant stash of objects, most of which he finds at estate sales.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"The Great Flood," an all-archival clip documentary revisiting the events and effects of the devastating Mississippi River flood of 1927, is by turns hypnotic, playful, wildly evocative and even a bit trippy. But most of all it's a unique, highly immersing audio-visual experience that would be as at home in a museum as it is in a movie theater - and that's a first-order compliment. Experimental filmmaker Bill Morrison ("Decasia," "The Miners' Hymns") has masterfully assembled a collage of silent, monochrome archival footage of this largely forgotten catastrophe - call it the Hurricane Katrina of its day - in which the Mississippi's levees broke in 145 places, engulfing 27,000 square miles of land from southern Illinois to New Orleans.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"The Great Flood," an all-archival clip documentary revisiting the events and effects of the devastating Mississippi River flood of 1927, is by turns hypnotic, playful, wildly evocative and even a bit trippy. But most of all it's a unique, highly immersing audio-visual experience that would be as at home in a museum as it is in a movie theater - and that's a first-order compliment. Experimental filmmaker Bill Morrison ("Decasia," "The Miners' Hymns") has masterfully assembled a collage of silent, monochrome archival footage of this largely forgotten catastrophe - call it the Hurricane Katrina of its day - in which the Mississippi's levees broke in 145 places, engulfing 27,000 square miles of land from southern Illinois to New Orleans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Nancy Spero, a pioneering feminist artist who examined the treatment of women and the horrors of war, has died. She was 83. Spero died Oct. 18 in a Manhattan hospital of respiratory complications from an infection, said Mary Sabbatino, vice president of Galerie Lelong in New York. Spero's work combined drawing, painting, collage and printmaking. She was active in the women's movement, and in the 1970s decided to focus on the roles of women. "The basis of Spero's artmaking is to isolate and juxtapose images of women," Christopher Hume wrote in the Toronto Star in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Matjames Metson's Silver Lake studio is in a 1930s Art Deco duplex perched atop a steep flight of aging, concrete stairs overlooking a cul-de-sac, which overlooks a hillside, which overlooks a bustling intersection that, from above, appears to be teeming with tiny toy cars and action-figure people. Inside, Metson's dusty, sunlit living room-turned-art studio is also full of tiny treasures. The assemblage artist builds intricate, architectural sculptures, wall hangings and furniture made from his abundant stash of objects, most of which he finds at estate sales.
SPORTS
December 27, 1987
EDITOR'S NOTE: These letters represent many of the best received by The Times in 1987, and reflect the leading issues and events discussed in Viewpoint during that period. Imagine my surprise when I tuned in the Fiesta Bowl, expecting to watch the two best college football teams in action, only to discover that a collage of the year's worst high school miscues was airing instead. Is that all $4.8 million buys these days? LON ATKINS Costa Mesa
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
Hannelore Baron's collages and box assemblages are wispy, dark, runic things that seem on the verge of whispering great truths. The self-taught artist, who died in New York in 1987, liked to work with scrap materials because she was intrigued by the very fact of their survival over the years. Accompanying the uneven, fraying rectangles and strips of yellowed paper and cloth--often pasted down demurely, side-by-side, or neatly layered--are images of faceless, sexless figures and scrawny, illegible lettering.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
Following its group shows of area painters and sculptors, Another Year in LA now presents "Drawing (Los Angeles). " Featuring five artists (plus a cameo appearance by non-local Stephen Kaltenbach), the show is a sampler more than a survey but manages to convey, with a good deal of verve, how elastic the category of drawing has become. Materials matter less than manner of approach -- a certain rawness, directness, immediacy. John Knuth's word paintings spelled out using emergency road flares and Christopher Russell's scratched and spray-painted "Framing Exercises" are all tactile energy.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Collages with the material heft of sculptures and sculptures with the two-dimensional articulation of flat drawings characterize Florian Morlat's engagingly strange show at Cherry and Martin. (The show is the first of a two-part exhibition, the second installment opening June 8.) The palette is dominated by the red-black-white seriousness of Constructivist art, with its early 20th century emphasis on theory in service of productive revolution, while the gawky eccentricity of the forms is more in keeping with the tactile seductions of participatory sculpture by the late Franz West.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Times asked its reporters and critics to highlight figures in entertainment and the arts who will be making news in 2014. Here's who they picked: Anne Ellegood | Curator Hammer Museum Senior Curator Anne Ellegood will likely see some attention this spring with the debut of her long-mulled, provocative show "Take It or Leave It: Institution, Image, Ideology. " The 35-artist historical show - co-organized by Ellegood's friend, New York-based art historian Johanna Burton - is an institutional critique of museums themselves as it examines American artists who the curators felt have changed the way we, as a culture, think about art. Among those included in the exhibition, focusing on work largely from the '80s and '90s, are Barbara Kruger, Mike Kelley, Jimmie Durham, Adrian Piper and David Wojnarowicz.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Jacob Silverman
"Bough Down," the first book by artist Karen Green, arrives trailing a train of sorrow. Green was married to writer David Foster Wallace, who committed suicide in September 2008. He was 46. Green has surfaced intermittently since then, giving few interviews. In 2009, at an exhibit in South Pasadena, she showed a piece called "The Forgiveness Machine," a 7-foot-long device into which one placed a piece of paper inscribed with what you wanted forgiven; the paper emerged, shredded, from the other end of the machine.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Collages with the material heft of sculptures and sculptures with the two-dimensional articulation of flat drawings characterize Florian Morlat's engagingly strange show at Cherry and Martin. (The show is the first of a two-part exhibition, the second installment opening June 8.) The palette is dominated by the red-black-white seriousness of Constructivist art, with its early 20th century emphasis on theory in service of productive revolution, while the gawky eccentricity of the forms is more in keeping with the tactile seductions of participatory sculpture by the late Franz West.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
"Dialogues in Time" at Jancar skips between past and present in Ilene Segalove's life and work, looking at each through the lens of the other. It's a small show, but a poignant romp: at once blunt, wry, endearing and revealing. The recent work deals mainly with slippage between now and then, between the real and the ostensibly ideal. In "Whatever Happened to My Future" (2012), the 60-year-old  Segalove video-chats with her 20-year-old self, thanks to some doctored old reel-to-reel footage.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By August Brown
The Montreal band Godspeed You! Black Emperor is famous for its collages of doomsaying street sermons and sad-eyed orchestrations. But the website You Are Listening to Los Angeles gives that formula a local and often spooky revamp.  The site pairs dueling live-streams of instrumental ambient music culled from Soundcloud with chatter taken from the LAPD Citywide Dispatch and Hot Spots radio frequency. It's a simple idea, but the tandem streams make you feel as if you're starring in your own private " Collateral " or " Drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
This may be the information age, but more specifically, it's the mash-up moment.  Images, sounds, words -- all are retrieved instantly from our collective digital memory bank by artists and advertisers alike, shaken, stirred and spilled back out. In the day when collage really did involve scissors and glue, the discontinuities it invoked had more power to jolt and disarm. Think Höch and Heartfield. Now, makers are mixers and the visual fabric of the everyday is a busy, buzzing patchwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | PAUL YOUNG
Fifteen years may seem like a long time in today's art world, but it was exactly 15 years ago that critic Dave Hickey predicted the onslaught of "beauty" among artists of the 1990s. (Or more precisely, "the language of visual effect, the rhetoric of how things look, the iconography of desire.") He was right, of course, although one could argue over why. Was it because we had grown tired of "idea" art? Or because buyers were demanding more lush and decorative works? Whichever the case, things haven't changed much.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1995
As someone who was working as a fund-raiser at the Mark Taper Forum at the time, I can tell you that in the days leading up to the premiere of "Angels in America," Tony Kushner was about as terrified as a man can be without falling over dead ("The Play That Made Us Gasp," by Lawrence Christon, Aug. 6). He knew he had something, he just didn't think it was that big of a something, and he was sincerely worried that the Taper would lose its shirt. When I mentioned to him that I was certain he would win the Pulitzer Prize, he said, "I'll bet you $100 I don't."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
Following its group shows of area painters and sculptors, Another Year in LA now presents "Drawing (Los Angeles). " Featuring five artists (plus a cameo appearance by non-local Stephen Kaltenbach), the show is a sampler more than a survey but manages to convey, with a good deal of verve, how elastic the category of drawing has become. Materials matter less than manner of approach -- a certain rawness, directness, immediacy. John Knuth's word paintings spelled out using emergency road flares and Christopher Russell's scratched and spray-painted "Framing Exercises" are all tactile energy.
TRAVEL
January 8, 2012
Name: PicCollage Available for: iPhone and iPad What it does: Helps you create a photo collage from your library photos, Facebook albums or pics from the Web (if you're only pretending you took a trip to Africa). You can impress your mother, brag to your co-workers, and make your vacation look even better than it really was, all before you pack your suitcase to return home. Cost: Free. What's hot: It could be the fastest way you'll ever find to organize a batch of photos.
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