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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Andrew Hill has always traveled through jazz on his own path, at his own speed, and in his own good time. From the release of his first albums in the '60s to the present, he has been a musical outsider, taking what he feels he can use from the jazz mainstream, employing it in a fashion that satisfies his own singular creative vision.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES
It's hard to shake the feeling that Heidi Duckler's new "Out of Circulation" ought to be funnier than it is. Or nastier than it is. After all, this local site-specific choreographer is known for satirizing Americans' love affair with cars and phones and limited women's roles and fashions and a few other restrictive obsessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1996 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Highly metaphorical and obsessively personal, Andrei Tarkovsky's "The Mirror" can be difficult for audiences raised on the mainstream movies of Hollywood. Tarkovsky's 1976 film (screening Friday night as part of UC Irvine's Through the Looking Glass series) is as anti-Hollywood as it gets. What there is of a plot shifts in space and time as if all the characters and events are moving in dreams. No tidy resolutions, no easy steps from here to there.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1992 | DAVID PAGEL
Collage was invented at the beginning of the century to bring a little bit of life's grittiness back into an art that was becoming so specialized that it seemed to be losing its connection to the rest of the world. Picasso and Braque inserted newspaper clippings and other odds and ends from the urban environment into their abstract pictures in order to revitalize their formal experiments.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1992 | KAREN FRICKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's hard to think of a more fitting venue for the Los Angeles area premiere of Mac Wellman's Obie-Award-Winning monologue "Terminal Hip," than the Soda Mug, a tiny, sweltering cafe in an obscure Venice strip of restaurants. And from its fine work with this production, it's hard to think of a better company to stage it than the little-known four-person ensemble Bottom's Dream. Overturning traditional notions of what makes appropriate theater is, after all, Wellman's stock in trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2001 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Programmatic music hasn't disappeared from the contemporary classical stage, but it is scarce. That made Xtet's Monday Evening Concert at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art a refreshing anomaly, with three works created in response to specific narrative or dramatic impetus. L.A.'s Xtet, a malleable new music entity, brought the storied music engagingly to life. Paul Chihara's "Minidoka" is a poignant musical memoir of the composer's childhood years, which were spent in an internment camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Hockney has so popularized a manner of photo collage--in which dozens or even hundreds of standard-size color prints are assembled into a shimmering, faceted whole--that those who practice the same method are assumed to be derivative, poachers on claimed territory. But for all the simple charm of his work, Hockney neither defined the medium of photo collage nor exhausted it.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
How many schoolgirls get to have Yukio Mishima as a house guest? "When I was a freshman at Radcliffe, I came home and there he was," recalled playwright Rosanna Yamagiwa Alfaro, whose examination of Japan's flamboyant writer, "Mishima," opens Thursday at East West Players. "He was giving a paper at the University of Michigan, where my father was a professor of Japanese literature. My parents had a lot of visitors from Japan who wore three-piece suits, were very formal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2006 | Patricia Sullivan, From the Washington Post
Francesca Danieli, a late-blooming artist whose collages were described as "disturbing and seductive" and whose video and photographic projects challenged mortality and contemporary political rhetoric, died of breast cancer June 27 at a Baltimore hospice. She was 52. A nationally honored photo collagist, Danieli was more widely known for "One Nice Thing," a film she made with Julia Kim Smith.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The latest annual report of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., one of America's oldest companies--founded in 1802 by a French immigrant who gave the fledgling U.S. armed forces a better grade of gunpowder--is a zinger. On its cover, beside a photo collage suggesting youth and age, management declares: "We are transforming DuPont into the most flexible, aggressive and youngest 200-year old company in the world."
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