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HEALTH
February 26, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Restylane, a popular cosmetic treatment for temporarily plumping out wrinkles, actually makes the skin produce more collagen, the natural stuff that makes skin look young, researchers said last week. That means the product, which millions of people have had injected around their lips, cheeks and foreheads, has effects beyond what its manufacturers claim, the team at the University of Michigan Health System reported.
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SCIENCE
January 21, 2014 | Monte Morin
In Korea and Japan they call turkeys "seven-faced birds," because male gobblers can alter the color of their head and neck when they're seeking a mate or trying to intimidate a rival. Now, researchers at UC Berkeley say the same principle that allows turkeys to cycle through shades of red, white and blue can also be used to ferret out explosives. In a paper published Tuesday in Nature Communications, researchers said that after examining fresh turkey heads from a local farm, they determined that the microscopic arrangement of collagen fibers, as well as blood vessels, was responsible for the color show.
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SCIENCE
August 25, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An experimental synthetic cornea implanted in 10 patients may be a potential alternative to cadaver corneas for curing vision loss due to corneal inflammation and scarring, researchers said Wednesday. Eye surgeons currently use primarily cadaver corneas for transplants, but that requires the use of anti-rejection drugs and presents a risk of infection. Plastic corneas can also be used, but they present other problems and are generally tried only when tissue transplants have failed.
IMAGE
July 29, 2012 | By Laurie Jane Drake
If you're over 40, you probably remember that first time someone called you "Ma'am" or "Sir. " It almost surely hurt, no matter how young and fit you felt. Evidently, your age was showing in those wrinkles and sags. Some decide to live with it; others do everything they can to obliterate the evidence. Today there are more nonsurgical options than ever to erase lines, thanks to new developments in the world of fillers. Thirty years ago, a filler such as Zyplast (cow collagen) would be injected to bring a line or scar up to the level of the surrounding skin.
IMAGE
July 29, 2012 | By Laurie Jane Drake
If you're over 40, you probably remember that first time someone called you "Ma'am" or "Sir. " It almost surely hurt, no matter how young and fit you felt. Evidently, your age was showing in those wrinkles and sags. Some decide to live with it; others do everything they can to obliterate the evidence. Today there are more nonsurgical options than ever to erase lines, thanks to new developments in the world of fillers. Thirty years ago, a filler such as Zyplast (cow collagen) would be injected to bring a line or scar up to the level of the surrounding skin.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Johnson & Johnson won U.S. approval for Evolence, an injectable wrinkle filler that will compete in a market forecast to grow to more than $847 million by 2012. The Food and Drug Administration cleared the collagen-based filler for "correction of moderate to deep facial wrinkles and folds," J&J said. The drug was approved in Europe in 2004. Evolence uses collagen from pigs.
HEALTH
April 25, 2011 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Scientists have long grown cells in flat dishes, which is handy if you're studying flat tissues. But organs have bulges and ridges and other shapes, and growing cells to mimic that geometry has been a challenge. Now, researchers have come up with a simple way to raise cells in tall, thin columns that better re-create the natural structure of the human intestine. It should prove useful in lab studies and perhaps someday in people without enough intestine of their own, says Dr. Daniel Teitelbaum, a gastrointestinal surgeon at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, who was not involved in the study.
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | From Reuters
Rats that eat high levels of a natural sugar known as fructose seem to age faster than other rats--and the same could be true for people who eat too much sweet junk food, Israeli researchers said Monday. Fructose, found naturally in honey and fruit, is used widely in foods ranging from soft drinks to yogurt. Although its sweet taste is popular, the sugar could cause wrinkles and health problems, the researchers said. Dr.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
A drug already on the market to treat severely clenched fingers may also be useful in treating the excessively curved penis caused by Peyronie's disease, researchers reported Monday. If the findings are validated in larger trials, the drug, called Xiaflex, could become the first effective medical treatment for the condition, which apart from embarrassment can cause impotence and pain. The company that manufactures the drug, Auxilium Pharmaceuticals Inc.  of Malvern, Pa., said it hopes to have approval from the Food and Drug Administration to market the drug for this purpose by the end of the year.
SCIENCE
January 21, 2014 | Monte Morin
In Korea and Japan they call turkeys "seven-faced birds," because male gobblers can alter the color of their head and neck when they're seeking a mate or trying to intimidate a rival. Now, researchers at UC Berkeley say the same principle that allows turkeys to cycle through shades of red, white and blue can also be used to ferret out explosives. In a paper published Tuesday in Nature Communications, researchers said that after examining fresh turkey heads from a local farm, they determined that the microscopic arrangement of collagen fibers, as well as blood vessels, was responsible for the color show.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
A drug already on the market to treat severely clenched fingers may also be useful in treating the excessively curved penis caused by Peyronie's disease, researchers reported Monday. If the findings are validated in larger trials, the drug, called Xiaflex, could become the first effective medical treatment for the condition, which apart from embarrassment can cause impotence and pain. The company that manufactures the drug, Auxilium Pharmaceuticals Inc.  of Malvern, Pa., said it hopes to have approval from the Food and Drug Administration to market the drug for this purpose by the end of the year.
HEALTH
June 20, 2011 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A biological Jell-O with a structure as precise as a microchip's could someday be the surgeon's patch to seal large, deep wounds and help them regrow skin. Using techniques borrowed from silicon chip design, researchers at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., created a network of channels in soft sheets of collagen, a main component of skin. Body cells fill those channels with blood vessels — and that crucial blood supply, in turn, coaxes skin to regrow. This tissue template, described online May 6 in the journal Biomaterials, works well in mice.
HEALTH
April 25, 2011 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Scientists have long grown cells in flat dishes, which is handy if you're studying flat tissues. But organs have bulges and ridges and other shapes, and growing cells to mimic that geometry has been a challenge. Now, researchers have come up with a simple way to raise cells in tall, thin columns that better re-create the natural structure of the human intestine. It should prove useful in lab studies and perhaps someday in people without enough intestine of their own, says Dr. Daniel Teitelbaum, a gastrointestinal surgeon at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, who was not involved in the study.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2010 | By Andrew Zajac, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Food and Drug Administration acknowledged Thursday that it made a mistake in overruling its scientists and approving a knee implant after the agency was lobbied by four members of Congress. The FDA said in a statement that it would seek to remove the device from the market, but also would meet with the company that makes it, ReGen Biologics Inc. of Hackensack, N.J., to see if there is a process through which they could apply again for approval for the implant. The device, called a Menaflex Collagen Scaffold, was approved by the FDA in December 2008 to repair and reinforce the meniscus, a C-shaped disc of tissue that cushions and helps lubricate bones in the knee joint.
SCIENCE
August 25, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An experimental synthetic cornea implanted in 10 patients may be a potential alternative to cadaver corneas for curing vision loss due to corneal inflammation and scarring, researchers said Wednesday. Eye surgeons currently use primarily cadaver corneas for transplants, but that requires the use of anti-rejection drugs and presents a risk of infection. Plastic corneas can also be used, but they present other problems and are generally tried only when tissue transplants have failed.
IMAGE
July 5, 2009 | Alexandra Drosu
When Angelina Jolie attended the Cannes Film Festival this year, she caused a stir -- and not just on the red carpet. Beauty boards buzzed about her radiant skin, speculating on the recent transformation. Was it plastic surgery? A chemical peel? British magazine Grazia claimed to have the inside scoop -- derma rolling.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1996 | ROBIN ESTRIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A few years ago, a lobbyist offered to help state Rep. Carol Donovan visit the big, four-smokestacked factory off Route 93, a few miles north of Boston. But when Donovan appeared as scheduled, she was told she would not be given a tour. All she saw was the inside of a conference room. "If there's nothing going on, why are they so protective, and why are they keeping everyone out, and why are they so suspicious?" she asked. "It makes me suspicious of what's going on."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1992
No one disputes the need for a strong FDA to protect consumers ("Report Charges FDA Failure on Wrinkle Products," Nov. 23). But it is a shame the House Government Operations Committee, in reviewing the FDA in its recently released Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations Subcommittee report, can't get the facts straight. It is also a shame that you chose not to research the facts behind the report. The article implies that Collagen Corp. promotes off-label uses of its collagen products and sells products that may be unsafe.
IMAGE
January 25, 2009 | Max Padilla
New Zealand sheep's wool, silk fabric, Canadian salmon skin, crab shells. This odd melange sounds like the beginning of a found-art project or a culinary misfire, but at the Tom Brophy Salon, it's the ingredients list for a new hair salve.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Johnson & Johnson won U.S. approval for Evolence, an injectable wrinkle filler that will compete in a market forecast to grow to more than $847 million by 2012. The Food and Drug Administration cleared the collagen-based filler for "correction of moderate to deep facial wrinkles and folds," J&J said. The drug was approved in Europe in 2004. Evolence uses collagen from pigs.
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