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NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
The Tommy Hilfiger brand is hitting the SoCal roads this summer to promote its new Surf Shack collection of beachy keen clothes. The limited-edition collection, which is already in stores and available online, is apparently (and we quote) "inspired by the warm waters of Malibu, Australia's Gold Coast and chilly Atlantic swells in Biarritz. It's sunset drinks at the cottage, late-night beach bonfires and après surf clambakes. " We've never been to an après surf clambake, but imagine we could find something suitable in the sand-and-sea-themed capsule collection.  The 12-piece women's collection includes pieces like chambray playsuits, white blazer and pleated dresses suitable for wearing over hibiscus-print bikinis or swimsuits festooned with anchors.
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AUTOS
October 1, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
It was a Scottish team with a French name racing British cars. In the 1950s and early 1960s Ecurie Ecosse (French for Team Scotland) was a small private racing team that took on some of the world's largest professional powerhouses -- and won. Now a collection of cars from this historic effort is headed to auction at the end of the year. PHOTOS: Ecurie Ecosse collection headed to auction Bonhams announced it would offer seven of the team's cars and one transport truck in a London auction  Dec. 1. The collection is a "definitive representation of perhaps Britain's best-loved motor racing team," James Knight, Bonhams' group motoring director said.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2010 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: How do I choose a collection service for my unpaid invoices? Answer: Ask agencies about their recovery percentages, their rates and whether they have experience with your industry. Balance their commissions with their success rates, said Tony Reisz, chief of Ontario Systems of Muncie, Ind., which sells collections software. "Carefully consider and evaluate how an agency will reduce your costs while improving efficiency," he said. Check references with other firms in your industry.
NEWS
October 12, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt
If you haven't heard of British eyewear brand Oliver Goldsmith, think of Michael Caine's signature black glasses, John Lennon's iconic granny glasses and Audrey Hepburn's oversize sunnies in “Breakfast at Tiffany's.” Other A-list clients of the heritage label include Sophia Loren, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Princess Diana, Ursula Andress, the duke of Windsor, Peter Sellers and Mick Jagger. Grace Kelly owned at least 20 pairs of the glasses; Goldsmith once traveled to the palace in Monaco, where she commissioned him to create 11 pairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Megan Doll
Institutionalized for the last 27 years of his life, Swiss modernist Robert Walser achieved a literary rebirth when a vast collection of paper strips, covered with tiny, cryptic pencil markings, was discovered after his death in 1956. First thought to be in secret code, Walser's prose fragments turned out to be composed in Kurrent, a script style dating to the Middle Ages. The 25 short pieces that make up "The Microscripts" (New Directions: 160 pp., $24.95) have been culled from a six-volume German collection of these writings.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Trade Commission said Wednesday that it had closed its investigation into Google Inc.'s collection of data over unsecured wireless networks after the Internet giant pledged to strengthen privacy controls. The agency also said the Mountain View, Calif., company agreed not to use the data it says it inadvertently collected while operating a fleet of vehicles for its Street View mapping service, according to a letter from David Vladeck, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, to Albert Gidari, a Google attorney.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Cheap is becoming chic in a different way. British pop star M.I.A.'s upcoming capsule collection for Versus Versace brings street style's current love of twisting designer logos and prints to a high fashion brand. For this 19-piece collection, which hits stores Oct. 16, M.I.A. created prints inspired by bootleg Versace merchandise she found in London markets as a teenager. Gold medallions galore, and versions of famous Versace emblems such as the Medusa head and interlocking Greek key, are blown up and spliced together on T-shirts, printed jeans, silk shirts, jersey dresses and military-inspired outerwear for Versace's lower-price brand with a rotating cast of designers.
IMAGE
March 7, 2010 | By Max Padilla, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After two years in New York, designers Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos are returning to L.A. to meet and greet customers as they launch their new spring collection at Confederacy on March 18. "It's fun coming back to L.A.," Halmos says. "I've been back only once for a quick weekend trip. We can listen to LL Cool J's ‘Going Back to Cali' on the way." Along with John Whitledge and Josia Lamberto-Egan, Halmos and Shipley founded Trovata eight years ago in Newport Beach. After winning the CFDA Swarovski Perris Ellis award for menswear in 2006, the duo left the label — now designed by Whitledge — but they retain an ownership stake in Trovata in addition to designing the Shipley & Halmos line.
MAGAZINE
October 24, 2004
I was pleased to see the article on retired Judge William C. Beverly Jr.'s efforts to document the achievements of African Americans and other Los Angeles minorities ("One for the History Books," by Emory Holmes II, Metropolis, Oct. 3). Such an effort is long overdue. I hope that Judge Beverly's collection will gain support and evolve into one that is more accessible to the public. Valena Broussard Dismukes Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By David Ng
Museums usually acquire tangible objects for their collections, but the Cooper - Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York has made the unconventional decision to acquire a sizable piece of intangible computer code. The museum said it has added the iPad application Planetary to its collection, marking the first time that the institution has acquired a piece of software as part of its curatorial mission. The Smithsonian described it in the September issues of its official magazine as an "unprecedented acquisition of an artifact you will never find encased in a plexiglass cube or sequestered in a climate-controlled storage facility.
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