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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By David Ng
A trove of approximately 90,000 pieces of personal war correspondence dating from the American Revolution to the war in Afghanistan is set to open at Chapman University in Orange County in November, thanks to a donation from collector, historian and author Andrew Carroll. As the Los Angeles Times reported in December, the university will allow students and members of the public greater access to the letters, as well as assist in the preservation of the documents. A Chapman spokeswoman said this week that the opening ceremony has been scheduled for Veteran's Day, Nov. 11.  The letters will be housed at the new Center for American War Letters, which will occupy a historic building on the perimeter of the Orange campus, said the spokeswoman.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 2010 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: How do I choose a collection service for my unpaid invoices? Answer: Ask agencies about their recovery percentages, their rates and whether they have experience with your industry. Balance their commissions with their success rates, said Tony Reisz, chief of Ontario Systems of Muncie, Ind., which sells collections software. "Carefully consider and evaluate how an agency will reduce your costs while improving efficiency," he said. Check references with other firms in your industry.
NEWS
October 12, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt
If you haven't heard of British eyewear brand Oliver Goldsmith, think of Michael Caine's signature black glasses, John Lennon's iconic granny glasses and Audrey Hepburn's oversize sunnies in “Breakfast at Tiffany's.” Other A-list clients of the heritage label include Sophia Loren, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Princess Diana, Ursula Andress, the duke of Windsor, Peter Sellers and Mick Jagger. Grace Kelly owned at least 20 pairs of the glasses; Goldsmith once traveled to the palace in Monaco, where she commissioned him to create 11 pairs.
IMAGE
March 9, 2014 | By Melissa Magsaysay
We've seen supermodel Alessandra Ambrosio posing in bejeweled bikinis and gigantic feather wings. Now she's crossing over to the other side of the camera, creating a line of beachy, bohemian clothing called ále by Alessandra. The longtime Victoria's Secret Angel draws on her Brazilian heritage and Southern California lifestyle for the collection, which is scheduled to debut at Planet Blue stores and www.shopplanetblue.com on March 15. "It reflects my everyday life," Ambrosio says of the collection, whose pieces sell for $60 to $260.
IMAGE
March 7, 2010 | By Max Padilla, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After two years in New York, designers Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos are returning to L.A. to meet and greet customers as they launch their new spring collection at Confederacy on March 18. "It's fun coming back to L.A.," Halmos says. "I've been back only once for a quick weekend trip. We can listen to LL Cool J's ‘Going Back to Cali' on the way." Along with John Whitledge and Josia Lamberto-Egan, Halmos and Shipley founded Trovata eight years ago in Newport Beach. After winning the CFDA Swarovski Perris Ellis award for menswear in 2006, the duo left the label — now designed by Whitledge — but they retain an ownership stake in Trovata in addition to designing the Shipley & Halmos line.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Trade Commission said Wednesday that it had closed its investigation into Google Inc.'s collection of data over unsecured wireless networks after the Internet giant pledged to strengthen privacy controls. The agency also said the Mountain View, Calif., company agreed not to use the data it says it inadvertently collected while operating a fleet of vehicles for its Street View mapping service, according to a letter from David Vladeck, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, to Albert Gidari, a Google attorney.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Megan Doll
Institutionalized for the last 27 years of his life, Swiss modernist Robert Walser achieved a literary rebirth when a vast collection of paper strips, covered with tiny, cryptic pencil markings, was discovered after his death in 1956. First thought to be in secret code, Walser's prose fragments turned out to be composed in Kurrent, a script style dating to the Middle Ages. The 25 short pieces that make up "The Microscripts" (New Directions: 160 pp., $24.95) have been culled from a six-volume German collection of these writings.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Cheap is becoming chic in a different way. British pop star M.I.A.'s upcoming capsule collection for Versus Versace brings street style's current love of twisting designer logos and prints to a high fashion brand. For this 19-piece collection, which hits stores Oct. 16, M.I.A. created prints inspired by bootleg Versace merchandise she found in London markets as a teenager. Gold medallions galore, and versions of famous Versace emblems such as the Medusa head and interlocking Greek key, are blown up and spliced together on T-shirts, printed jeans, silk shirts, jersey dresses and military-inspired outerwear for Versace's lower-price brand with a rotating cast of designers.
MAGAZINE
October 24, 2004
I was pleased to see the article on retired Judge William C. Beverly Jr.'s efforts to document the achievements of African Americans and other Los Angeles minorities ("One for the History Books," by Emory Holmes II, Metropolis, Oct. 3). Such an effort is long overdue. I hope that Judge Beverly's collection will gain support and evolve into one that is more accessible to the public. Valena Broussard Dismukes Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1996
As an educator and art historian who for the last 30 years has been committed to enhancing the cultural life of our community, I read with surprise and sadness of the imminent departure of the Gilbert collections from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art ("LACMA Will Remove Trustee's Collection," April 18). Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert's collections of silver, micro-mosaic and gold boxes are likely valued at well over $150 million and their intrinsic value is even greater. What an inestimable loss to our community if we can no longer share in viewing objects whose beauty and history recall supreme moments of human creativity and the exaltation of human spirit.
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