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Collective Soul

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
Collective Soul is looking for its Target audience, literally. In a sign of the times, the Georgia-bred band is the latest name act in rock to sign an exclusive deal with a major retailer. The group's seventh album, "Afterword," will arrive Tuesday on the CD racks of Target's 1,502 locations in the U.S. and will be sold at no other stores for one year.
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NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The Wine Amplified Weekend returns Sept. 6 and 7 to the beach at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, and with it the premise that good music is even better with good wine and good food. The festival will launch at Mandalay with the Sept. 6 “Bubbles and Chocolate” event at the Moore Beach Club . Bubbly from Mo e t & Chandon will be paired with indulgent sweets prepared by Christophe Feyt, the resort's executive pastry chef. The evening's entertainment will be provided by Collective Soul , a band that shot to stardom in 1993 with its double-platinum album, “Hints, Allegations and Things Left Unsaid.” The Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1997 | NATALIE NICHOLS
Collective Soul conjured an intimate '70s arena-rock vibe at the John Anson Ford Theatre on Thursday, connecting with fans and soldiering on despite technical difficulties but offering little evidence of originality. The Georgia quintet's 90-minute set featured material from its current album, "Disciplined Breakdown," plus older favorites such as "Smashing Young Man."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1994 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Ready for a down-home Bono? Or maybe Eddie Vedder Lite? That was the persona suggested by Ed Roland as he led the Georgia band Collective Soul in its L.A. debut at the Roxy on Wednesday. The singer-guitarist conveyed U2's conviction that what happens on his stage is real, vital and serious stuff, and he recalled some of Vedder's taut intensity, complete with voice of steel and eyes whose pupils roll up and out of sight.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's something comforting about Collective Soul. The fact that this simple-looking, unpretentious rock band consisting of boy-next-door types has become a success--with no bones to pick, no venom to spew and no personal controversies to wallow in--bodes well for rock music. This is a group you could take home to Mom--she'd want to feed them all lunch. They're not going to shoot anyone, punch anyone, overdose on drugs or try to change the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1995 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Collective Soul, a band from Georgia, gave rock 'n' roll a welcome shot of adrenaline at the Galaxy on Saturday night. The five musicians' low-key appearance (T-shirts, jeans, long hair) belied an explosive performance before a sold-out crowd. Fronted by singer-guitarist Ed Roland, they stirred memories of the early Replacements as they rocked noisily and with abandon, rarely slowing down to catch their collective breath.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Collective Soul, a small-town Georgia band, hit the Big Time big time in 1993 when their song "Shine" garnered substantially more airplay than "Marching Through Georgia" ever would at William T. Sherman High School. The five long-haired Georgians plus label-mate Rusty will perform Wednesday night at the Ventura Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1995 | STEVE APPLEFORD
** 1/2 Collective Soul, "Collective Soul," Atlantic. In pop music, second impressions do count, which is good for this Georgia quintet because its first release was a largely meandering collection of self-produced demos, some of it good, much of it not. Its saving grace was "Shine," an edgy rocker that found a place on radio formats everywhere. That song propelled the debut album to sales of more than a million.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
Collective Soul is looking for its Target audience, literally. In a sign of the times, the Georgia-bred band is the latest name act in rock to sign an exclusive deal with a major retailer. The group's seventh album, "Afterword," will arrive Tuesday on the CD racks of Target's 1,502 locations in the U.S. and will be sold at no other stores for one year.
NEWS
October 16, 2000
Well, finally someone spelled it out: "The boomers absolutely can't bear to grow up" ("If You Can't Join 'Em, Boss 'Em Around . . . and Imitate Them," Sept. 25). Sad, but true. So they just keep (obsessively) trying to reel in their kids from experiencing even the basics of teenage angst and rebellion. The guilt of excess must weigh heavy upon the collective soul of the boomers, resulting in paranoid projections upon their young. Relax, boomers, maybe we never grew up, but have some faith that your kids will make this rite of passage--then they can help you do it. CATHERINE HOWARD Santa Monica In this fast-paced world we live in, along with the bombardment of information into the minds of our children, using parents as filters and guideposts remains vital in their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sincerity sells. Who'd have thought it still possible here in the age of cynicism? But along comes a band like Florida quartet Creed, which kicks sonic derriere as forcefully as the most demonic hard-rock outfit while lead singer Scott Stapp unashamedly touts love as the cure for the world's ills. And how does the public respond? By gobbling up more than 10 million copies of the year-old "Human Clay" and its 1997 debut album, "My Own Prison."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998
SMALL FACES: The Mighty Mighty Bosstones and a reunion of Weezer leaders Rivers Cuomo and Matt Sharpe--who had split to return to college--head the cast on the soundtrack album for the youth comedy "Meet the Deedles," due in March. Others on the ska- and surf-heavy album are Save Ferris, Goldfinger, Cherry Poppin' Daddies and Hepcat. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1997 | NATALIE NICHOLS
Collective Soul conjured an intimate '70s arena-rock vibe at the John Anson Ford Theatre on Thursday, connecting with fans and soldiering on despite technical difficulties but offering little evidence of originality. The Georgia quintet's 90-minute set featured material from its current album, "Disciplined Breakdown," plus older favorites such as "Smashing Young Man."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1997 | Natalie Nichols
COLLECTIVE SOUL "Disciplined Breakdown" Atlantic * * 1/2 Singer-guitarist Ed Roland's knack for Beatles-esque song craft dominates Collective Soul's third major-label album. Revolving loosely around the Stockbridge, Ga., quintet's recent business and personal crises, the record suggests at least controlled chaos, but Roland's deft pop production and layered arrangements leave nothing out of line--and prove more impressive than many of the songs themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1997 | Natalie Nichols
COLLECTIVE SOUL "Disciplined Breakdown" Atlantic * * 1/2 Singer-guitarist Ed Roland's knack for Beatles-esque song craft dominates Collective Soul's third major-label album. Revolving loosely around the Stockbridge, Ga., quintet's recent business and personal crises, the record suggests at least controlled chaos, but Roland's deft pop production and layered arrangements leave nothing out of line--and prove more impressive than many of the songs themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM
With its first full-length CD, this veteran Fullerton band qualifies for an advanced degree in the brawny art of guitar-driven rock. Pat and Paul Gallagher divide the singing, the songwriting and the guitar playing. The brothers are anything but oblivious when it comes to writing and executing cannily structured, well-thought-out but satisfyingly hefty and messy-sounding guitar music that takes cues equally from the grungy early '90s and the psychedelic late '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1995 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Collective Soul, a band from Georgia, gave rock 'n' roll a welcome shot of adrenaline at the Galaxy on Saturday night. The five musicians' low-key appearance (T-shirts, jeans, long hair) belied an explosive performance before a sold-out crowd. Fronted by singer-guitarist Ed Roland, they stirred memories of the early Replacements as they rocked noisily and with abandon, rarely slowing down to catch their collective breath.
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