Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCollective Soul
IN THE NEWS

Collective Soul

ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's something comforting about Collective Soul. The fact that this simple-looking, unpretentious rock band consisting of boy-next-door types has become a success--with no bones to pick, no venom to spew and no personal controversies to wallow in--bodes well for rock music. This is a group you could take home to Mom--she'd want to feed them all lunch. They're not going to shoot anyone, punch anyone, overdose on drugs or try to change the world.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Collective Soul, a small-town Georgia band, hit the Big Time big time in 1993 when their song "Shine" garnered substantially more airplay than "Marching Through Georgia" ever would at William T. Sherman High School. The five long-haired Georgians plus label-mate Rusty will perform Wednesday night at the Ventura Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1994 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Ready for a down-home Bono? Or maybe Eddie Vedder Lite? That was the persona suggested by Ed Roland as he led the Georgia band Collective Soul in its L.A. debut at the Roxy on Wednesday. The singer-guitarist conveyed U2's conviction that what happens on his stage is real, vital and serious stuff, and he recalled some of Vedder's taut intensity, complete with voice of steel and eyes whose pupils roll up and out of sight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1994
Re "Boy Whose Parents Feared Deportation Had Leukemia," Nov. 24: As a legal, naturalized citizen and Hispanic mother of two children, I find it appalling that opponents of Proposition 187 would use Julio Cano's tragic death to accentuate the racial tensions associated with the ongoing debate on the issue's fairness and legality. The real tragedy of Julio Cano's death is not his family's fear of being deported. Rather, it seems his parents were willing to compromise their child's health and safety in order to remain illegally in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1994
Thanks to all those at CSUN for bringing poet Maya Angelou to the "epicenter" to speak on March 17. While the university has been criticized for spending $15,000 for this remarkable woman's time (Letters, March 21), I contend that $15,00 was a bargain. But then I was there. I was there with my 10-year-old daughter, a dear friend and a capacity crowd as Ms. Angelou performed CPR on our collective soul, offering us hope and strength and love and laughter. And while it is true that she never once mentioned the value of a dollar, Ms. Angelou held us spellbound as she reminded us of the value of the human spirit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993
Geffen speaks of being outraged by the speeches delivered by former presidential candidate Pat Buchanan and the Rev. Pat Robertson at the Republican Convention. As a serious Christian ( evangelical would probably be the best label), I would like Geffen to know that millions of us were outraged as well. Geffen must realize that there is no philosophically monolithic "Christian right" out there. This is a myth, often perpetuated by the fear-mongering, fund-raising letters of the ACLU.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Can you put together a definitive "greatest soul hits of the '70s" series of albums without including any of the works of such seminal '70s soul figures as Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, the Jackson 5 or Al Green? The answer is no. But Rhino Records' ambitious, 10-volume "Didn't It Blow Your Mind!
BOOKS
March 10, 1991 | Karen Stabiner
This is one of those books that makes you sigh for what might have been. Alice Neel and Rhoda Medary, painters who met at art school in the 1920s, are a fascinating pair--the former the first woman to have a solo show at the Whitney Museum, the latter a talented woman who chose family over career.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|