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NEWS
May 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
An amateur art collector has offered $135,805 for an abstract painting listed on EBay's online auction site. If it proves to be an original by the late Richard Diebenkorn, it could be a stunningly good investment. If not, Robert Keereweer of Nieuwkoop, Holland, will have thrown a great deal of money away on a garage-sale knockoff originally offered for 25 cents on an Internet site where the mantra is "buyer beware."
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BUSINESS
February 21, 1996 | Greg Johnson
Mention Mac Yasuda's name to serious guitar players and chances are they'll recognize the Newport Beach resident as the guy who owns one of the world's premier guitar collections. The Japan native fell in love with the stringed instruments, and purchased his first collector guitar--a battered old Gibson--after moving to the United States in 1970. In recent years, he has collected hundreds of rare instruments, some of which cost $50,000 or more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO
The items Ruth Oldham of Studio City has on display for Christmas this year are small, and that's the way she likes it. Oldham is a collector of Christmas miniatures, but she does not think small. On display are the more than 1,000 pieces she has collected over 30 years. They fill shelves that take up an entire wall in her apartment, depicting Santa's workshop, Santa's living room, Mrs. Claus' kitchen, a sleigh room and a candy factory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call him the Ant Man of Altadena. Also the Wasp Man, Beetle Man and Fly Man. Just watch as Robert H. Crandall--head down, rear up, arms bent and tucked to his sides--crouches his medium-sized frame into the attack pose of a deer fly. "They can bite you but good," said Crandall, 75, whose fascination with insects and crawling things dates from his childhood--and an actual, memorable bite.
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the bananas and imported cars that roll through the quiet Port of Hueneme came a bit of unexpected cargo: an operational Scud missile. The Russian-made missile, which gained notoriety in the 1991 Persian Gulf War, arrived earlier this month via cargo ship for a weapons collector in Northern California but was quickly confiscated by U.S. Customs Service officials, port spokesman Kam Quarles confirmed Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"That's despicable!" some might have hissed. But no one was saying that Friday as the Postal Service continued the trend of honoring great Americans with postage stamps by unveiling the first of 427 million new Daffy Duck stamps. Two hundred children wearing plastic duckbills over their faces tooted noisy duck calls outside Mann's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood to celebrate the 33-cent cartoon stamp, which goes on sale nationwide today. Why honor the conniving, frenetic Daffy?
SPORTS
April 16, 1995 | MIKE BRESNAHAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like a swimmer who nervously dips a big toe into 40-degree water, baseball-card collectors are cautiously coming back. Although nobody rushed to embrace Barry Bonds or Bobby Bonilla when they returned to camp this week, baseball hobbyists are warming up their cold shoulders. During the 232-day strike, baseball card sales were dormant, even dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yep, that was a vintage Betty Lou vase, all right, stuffed under a table at a flea market in Michigan. The collector braced herself. How much? She happily paid the $1 asking price and then promptly resold it--for $850. Talk about getting a head. Nationwide, antique dealers are snapping up the head-shaped vases that were popularized in the late '40s by Fullerton artist Betty Lou Nichols before the craze waned about 20 years later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1995 | TOM RAGAN
Though debate probably will never end over who is the greatest baseball player of all time, there is far less doubt among collectors about which baseball card is the most coveted: the 1910 version depicting Honus Wagner, the turn-of-the-century shortstop who was one of the first five players inducted into the Hall of Fame. Only 40 of the Wagner cards are left, and Sports Cards Plus in Laguna Niguel recently got hold of one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Detectives watched silently as the owlish man sat thumbing through rare stamps at a collectors exposition at the Long Beach Convention Center. They thought they had the case licked hours later when they say he walked away with unpaid items in his briefcase. But Long Beach police didn't know what they were up against until hours later, when they walked into the one-bedroom apartment of suspect Richard Pulsifer.
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