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College Administrators

NEWS
August 31, 2003 | From Associated Press
How young is too young when it comes to students entering college? Experts say each case needs to be evaluated individually. Gary Kiger, dean of the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences at Utah State University, has had at least two young prodigies enrolled during his tenure -- including a political science major who recently graduated as valedictorian at age 15.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994
Four times recently, articles have appeared in the Valley section about Pierce College and its president, Mary Lee. Each one emphasized the college's need for money. They described cutting courses to save money, adding needed courses to attract more students, commercial enterprises such as a golf range. Mary Lee, judging by past performance at Valley College, is the best college administrator in the L.A. Community College District, so she will probably pull Pierce out of the financial mess it's in. But even she ignores certain facts that influence Pierce and other community colleges.
NEWS
April 26, 1992
An article in The Times (April 15) implies that Citrus College was involved in the misuse of government surplus property. The college has not been implicated in any way. In fact, only one individual, acting without district authorization, has been implicated at this time. It appears from the preliminary federal investigation that a private entrepreneur, who is also a college employee, allegedly used the college's name without authorization to purchase and dispose of surplus government property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2002 | TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what local academics are calling an infringement on academic freedom, a Riverside Community College instructor has been suspended just days after he accused the school of inappropriately spending money earmarked for the classroom. College administrators allege that Frank Stearns, a tenured accounting instructor, was removed from campus for poor performance, including letting class out early on 45 occasions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1991 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five of 10 administrators at College of the Canyons will each teach at least one course next semester in an effort to offer more classes on the campus despite state budget cutbacks. But returning to the classroom--even if it is done in addition to their other duties--is not being seen as a chore by the administrators. "One of the most enjoyable things in life is to watch learning take place," said John Drislane, dean of personnel services, who will teach a Shakespeare class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2002 | REBECCA TROUNSON and ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Colleges and universities nationwide, many already hurting from the slow economy, are feeling a further pinch as the volatile stock market shrinks the value of their investments and makes some donors skittish. "People are nervous about their own futures right now, and some are backing off from making long-term commitments to major gifts," said Nancy Strouse, senior director of development at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1985 | HERBERT A. SAMPLE, Times Staff Writer
Two reports recommending improvements in Moorpark College's Exotic Animal Training and Management Program, accused last year of providing substandard care, call for an immediate reduction in the number of animals and an increase in funding. But the reports, one written by a college committee and the other by a consultant, concluded that general treatment of animals has been good and that many improvements have already begun. The college's program was begun 11 years ago.
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | ROBERT OURLIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of a blistering report by an accrediting committee, a key faculty group at Irvine Valley College has recommended a battery of reforms, including the removal of the college's embattled president. The recommendations by the Irvine Valley College Academic Senate carries no independent authority, but it is considered the official voice of teachers and professors in administrative matters. A recommendation to remove a president is considered rare.
OPINION
July 21, 2009
Two Los Angeles community colleges had their accreditation placed on probation this month, not because their academic offerings aren't good but because they have little way of knowing whether the offerings are good or not. Failure to conduct "program review" might sound like a minor administrative weakness at schools that try to meet a thousand needs with limited funds. But one of the most basic things a college can do is examine its programs to see whether they work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mission College President William E. Norlund apologized to area residents Saturday and accepted blame for the college's forfeiture of $4.7 million in state funds earmarked for expansion of the Sylmar campus. Norlund, speaking to more than 100 residents and activists at a forum in City Council chambers, said he should have solicited opinions regarding the proposed expansion early enough to meet a Dec. 30 deadline for using the funds. That deadline cannot be met now, he said.
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