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OPINION
April 14, 2007
Re "Best, brightest -- not admitted," Opinion, April 9 Meghan Daum is spot on with her piece about the absurd credence we give to college rankings.The wizardry of Oz that goes on at the admissions offices of these anointed schools is clearly meant to be beyond the comprehension of the folks in front of the curtain. College admission is not a precise science but really an art, we're told, and who can explain art? So does the spurned one now make fun of the club to which he or she was denied entry, as Daum finally suggests?
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By Lanhee J. Chen
The recent defeat of an effort to reinstitute affirmative action in admissions to California's public colleges and universities demonstrates the political power of Asian American voters and challenges the conventional wisdom about their partisan loyalties. The defeat is a reminder that Asian Americans can have a decisive impact on political and policymaking processes. Perhaps more important, it suggests that if education is a key issue that drives Asian American voters, the Democratic Party may not be able to reliably count on their support in the future.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In just a little longer than it takes her to get from one class to another, high school senior Kris Pate endured a ritual that has many of her peers in agony: She applied for college--and waited all of eight minutes to learn she was accepted. Just like that. Right there in the Aliso Niguel High School guidance office, after fidgeting, biting her lip and squirming while a Cal State Fullerton counselor scrutinized her high school transcript and college admissions test scores.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
For high school seniors, this is the season when hope meets reality when it comes to college admission - except for a Long Island teenager who has won the equivalent of the academic jackpot. Kwasi Enin, 17, of Shirley, N.Y., has been accepted by all eight Ivy League schools: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania. He now gets to choose among a cornucopia of educational riches.   "The yeses kept coming," Enin, who wants to be a physician, told Newsday, the Long Island newspaper.
OPINION
December 4, 1994 | LEE COFFIN, Lee A. Coffin is senior associate director of admissions at Connecticut College
Although the granddaddy of college admission criteria still has a pulse, last rites are in order for the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Already, 192 colleges and universities have abandoned the SAT as a required element of their selection process. My own institution joined them last month. It's time for the rest to embrace this movement. During my recruiting visits this fall, I was amazed by the degree of frustration secondary school professionals expressed toward the College Board and its SAT.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2004 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, whose father and grandfather preceded him in attending Yale University, said Friday that he opposed special treatment in college admission for children of alumni, just as he opposed special treatment for racial and ethnic minorities. In a question-and-answer session with minority journalists, Bush said he favored programs that increased diversity in the student body, but was against quotas for minority groups, as well as so-called legacy admissions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1992 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It isn't easy being a teen-ager in urban Los Angeles these days. There are the same anxieties over careers, college and growing up that students always have faced. Then add the stresses created by a fast-paced city torn by rioting and racial strife. A conference Saturday convened black student leaders from high schools across the county to grapple with everything from dating to racism to conflict mediation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
"So where is Waldo, really?" That's not the kind of question most high school seniors expect to find on their college admission applications. But it is one of the essay options that applicants to the University of Chicago face this year in their quest for a coveted freshman berth. It is the kind of mind-stretching, offbeat or downright freaky essay question that is becoming more common these days as colleges and universities seek to pierce the fog of students' traditional self-aggrandizing essays detailing their accomplishments and hardships.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
For high school seniors, this is the season when hope meets reality when it comes to college admission - except for a Long Island teenager who has won the equivalent of the academic jackpot. Kwasi Enin, 17, of Shirley, N.Y., has been accepted by all eight Ivy League schools: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania. He now gets to choose among a cornucopia of educational riches.   "The yeses kept coming," Enin, who wants to be a physician, told Newsday, the Long Island newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1999
Sigrid Bathen (Opinion, Oct. 17) omits the major plausible explanation for the importance of Advanced Placement courses. Because of high school grade inflation, the grade point average does not validly represent ability, as it previously did; hence colleges use AP courses and SATs as more valid measures of academic ability. The central problem is not the shortage of AP classes but poor graduation rates, low grades and SATs and failure to meet the qualifying course requirements for college admission.
OPINION
February 12, 2014
Re "Real diversity is colorblind," Opinion, Feb. 7 Jennifer Gratz presents the phony argument that not giving additional credit to African American students applying for college is race-neutral. The argument would be valid only if American society in general were race-neutral, which it is not. African Americans are much more likely than whites to live in districts with inferior K-12 schools; they are more likely to be at a disadvantage in being prepared to compete for a place in California's selective universities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Californians who use their credit cards for online purchases would gain some protection, and voters would decide whether the state's public universities could consider race and gender for admissions, under measures passed by the state Senate on Thursday. The Assembly has yet to act on either measure. Responding to cases in which hackers stole personal financial information on millions of credit card users, Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara) proposed limiting the details that online merchants may collect from their customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The state Senate on Thursday voted to put a constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would allow all state universities to consider race and gender in deciding students to admit. SCA 5 repeals portions of Proposition 209, the 1996 ballot measure prohibiting using race or gender in admission decisions. "A blanket prohibition on consideration of race and gender was a mistake in 1996 and we are still suffering the consequences today," said Sen. Ed Hernandez (D-Los Angeles)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2014 | By Jason Song
When Alma Renteria attended Lynwood High School, one of her best friends was a gifted soccer player and math student. "I thought he'd be an engineer," she said. But her friend was taking too few classes to fulfill requirements and barely graduated. Then he entered community college and quickly dropped out. "He had a lot of potential, but he just didn't know what to expect," said Renteria, who graduated from Lynwood in 2008 and is now a member of the school district's board. To help students look toward continuing their educations, district officials including Renteria put on an annual alumni fair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
After a long stretch of rising competition in college admissions, the numbers this year may be on the side of students like Davone Morales, an Eagle Rock High School senior. He and his classmates nationwide are lucky to be part of the smallest group in years applying to college. The population dip won't bust open the doors to Stanford, Harvard, UCLA and other highly selective campuses. But many experts predict it will be somewhat easier to obtain admission offers from many good, even competitive, schools.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
In the wake of a recent Supreme Court ruling that narrowed but did not do away with affirmative action in college admissions, the Obama administration has reaffirmed its commitment to using race as a factor in college admissions to help increase campus diversity. In a letter to college and university presidents, the departments of Education and Justice reminded educators that the Supreme Court in June ruled that race could still be used as a factor in admissions, as long as the race-based policies were necessary to achieve diversity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001
Re "UC Faculty Chief Backs Dropping SAT," Feb. 18. The emperor wears no clothes! Finally, someone of authority is willing to criticize our reliance on SAT scores as the main determinate in college admission. Congratulations Michael Cowan and Richard Atkinson for having the courage to publicly expose the uselessness of this test. Your proposal for a test that is based upon real knowledge (applicable to college curriculum) is logical, intelligent and dead-on. Tests should be designed to give accurate and useful information, or what is the point of having them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2009 | Larry Gordon
High school students, beware! College admissions and financial aid officers in California and elsewhere may be peeking over your digital shoulder at the personal information you post on your Facebook or MySpace page. And they might decide to toss out your application after reading what you wrote about that cool party last week or how you want to conduct your romantic life at college. According to a new report by the National Assn. for College Admission Counseling, about a quarter of U.S.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - Defying expectations that it was on the brink of doing away with affirmative action in higher education, the Supreme Court upheld using race as a factor in admissions decisions Monday as long as the race-based policies were truly necessary to achieve diversity. The 7-1 vote brought conservative and liberal justices together on a middle-ground approach that reaffirms the importance of racial and ethnic diversity on campus while pushing college officials to try "race-neutral" policies for enrolling more minority students.
OPINION
June 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Chen
Any day now, the Supreme Court will announce its decision in the Fisher vs. University of Texas case, which could invalidate the use of race-conscious policies in college admissions. Some Asian American groups, such as the 80-20 Education Foundation, have been among the most vocal and visible in opposing what's broadly termed affirmative action. They believe getting rid of race considerations will work to the advantage of Asian Americans, who on average have held more extracurricular leadership positions and have higher test scores and grade-point averages than whites, yet have the lowest acceptance rate to elite private universities.
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