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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2009 | Larry Gordon
University of California regents Wednesday gave preliminary approval to a controversial change in freshman admission standards that would drop the requirement for two SAT subject exams and make more students eligible for a review of their applications while guaranteeing entry to fewer. The change is considered among the most sweeping admissions policy shifts by the university in years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Gordon is a Times staff writer.
Despite recent improvements, Latino and black students continue to lag behind whites and Asians in becoming academically eligible to enter California's two public university systems, according to a state report released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2008 | Larry Gordon and Seema Mehta, Gordon and Mehta are Times staff writers.
Since Laura Monte was a child, her parents had assured her that if she did well in high school, the family would find a way to pay for college. Now, things are not so certain. The south Orange County family had socked away money in stock funds that grew to $45,000. Scott and Pam Monte figured that the investments, coupled with their dual income, would pay for four years of college. Then the stock market crashed, and the college fund dropped by half.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Gordon is a Times staff writer.
UC regents threatened Wednesday to place some unspecified limits on freshman enrollment next fall if the deficit-battered state government does not provide enough funding to the 10-campus university system. However, the regents avoided the definitive steps that the state's other public university system, California State, proposed earlier this week to reduce freshman admission and enforce earlier than usual deadlines for applications. At the urging of UC system president Mark G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2008 | Seema Mehta and Gale Holland, Mehta and Holland are Times staff writers.
Roberto Aguilar figures he has done everything right to earn a spot at a state college, working hard in high school to achieve a 3.5 GPA and SAT score of 1780. But the Pasadena 17-year-old's vision of the future -- moving away from home, meeting new friends in the dorms and exploring a new city -- is in jeopardy because of the state's budget woes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2008 | Gale Holland
With only a month to go for the most popular campuses, applications for fall 2009 are surging in the California State University system. As of midnight Thursday, first-time freshman applications to the system's 23 campuses were up 12% from the same date a year before, and transfer applications were up a whopping 36% A total of 138,000 applications had been submitted. Transfer students were deferred last year because of cutbacks, which explains some of the bubble. But some men and women undoubtedly are shifting from the University of California or out-of-state colleges to Cal State for economic reasons, Cal State spokeswomen Clara Potes-Fellow said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2008 | Gale Holland
In another sign of the state's economic woes, freshmen entering in the fall of 2009 are being urged to apply early to California State University campuses. The application window opens Wednesday. Because of state budget shortfalls, the system will not be able to absorb as much growth in enrollment as usual, officials said Monday, so later applicants risk losing out on their schools of choice. Six of the most popular campuses -- Fullerton, Long Beach, Pomona, San Diego, San Luis Obispo and Sonoma -- plan to stop taking applications Nov. 30. The 17 other campuses will accept applications through March 1, but may close down certain programs or majors when they reach capacity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2008 | By Sandy Banks
It's kind of hard to talk about affirmative action in college admissions when you have a black man from the Ivy League leading in the home stretch of the race for the nation's presidency. How much more proof of equal opportunity do we need? FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this column stated that black admissions at UCLA are beginning to climb "thanks to outreach efforts and a switch to a holistic admissions process that considers students' life circumstances, not just GPA and SAT scores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
The University of California did not violate students' freedom of expression and religion when it rejected some classes at a Riverside-area Christian school from counting toward UC admission, a Los Angeles federal judge has ruled.
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