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OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "In free agency we trust," Opinion, April 8 I'm desperately trying to hold on to the quaint notion that college athletes should be students first and foremost. Therefore, I applaud Mark Brilliant's idea of setting up a trust fund that spreads the wealth and yet is also tied in with academic progress. But he leaves out one group that profits most handsomely from the current system and never seems to have to pay for any of it: the owners of professional basketball and football franchises.
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OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "In free agency we trust," Opinion, April 8 I'm desperately trying to hold on to the quaint notion that college athletes should be students first and foremost. Therefore, I applaud Mark Brilliant's idea of setting up a trust fund that spreads the wealth and yet is also tied in with academic progress. But he leaves out one group that profits most handsomely from the current system and never seems to have to pay for any of it: the owners of professional basketball and football franchises.
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SPORTS
April 6, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
ARLINGTON, Texas -- NCAA President Mark Emmert said Sunday that unionizing students is a “ridiculous idea” to solving the problems of intercollegiate athletics. “It would blow up everything about the collegiate model of athletics,” Emmert said during a morning press conference at AT&T Stadium. “There are some people who think that might be fine. I don't think that represents the views of anybody up here right now.” Northwestern football players recently received regional clearance from the National Labor Relations Board to unionize as they seek more benefits for student athletes.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
NFL Players Assn. Executive Director DeMaurice Smith has spoken out in support of the ruling allowing Northwestern football players to unionize, saying it has nothing to do with college athletes looking for a paycheck. "In the more than 100 years since the NCAA was founded, it has not allowed athletes to have a seat at the table to discuss serious issues and therefore has done little to address full medical coverage for injuries sustained, limitations on practice time, scholarship shortfalls and rules to make promised education a reality," Smith wrote in an op-ed piece published Tuesday night by The Huffington Post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1995
Re "Reward College Athletes by Paying Them for Play," Campus Correspondence, Feb. 26: The assertion that Jeff Zeleny made concerning the payment of college athletes overlooked the blaring fact that many athletes receive scholarships from the schools at which they play. I do not think that student athletes should be paid in addition to the money that they receive for their education. I believe that the NCAA has made a wise decision in maintaining the amateur status of college athletes.
SPORTS
February 27, 2014 | Nathan Fenno
Electronic Arts Sports and the Collegiate Licensing Co. wanted to use the names and likenesses of college athletes in video games, according to an NCAA document unsealed in federal court Wednesday. The report was among hundreds of pages of documents that U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken ordered to be made fully or partially public in the long-running antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA fronted by former UCLA basketball player Ed O'Bannon. The case is scheduled for trial in June and, in the interim, the document dump provides another window into the often contentious issues of amateurism and compensation raised by the case.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Jon Healey
If you stop someone in the street and ask whether college athletes should be paid to play, the answer is likely to be "no. " Witness a recent Marist poll , which found that only 27% of the respondents felt that athletes deserved more than the scholarships and stipends they already receive. But the lawsuits brought by former UCLA hoops star Ed O'Bannon Jr. and other former college athletes raise a different question and may elicit a different answer. Should athletes receive a share of the money colleges make by selling their performances and likenesses to the media?
OPINION
January 18, 2002
William F. Devine Jr.'s rant about college athletes being shackled and exploited is wrong on the facts and wrong on the law. Last time I checked, an education at Stanford or Notre Dame can cost well over $100,000. If the "discrimination" is so rampant, then why hasn't any college athlete sued on this ground? The simple answer is because there isn't any. What Devine conspicuously ignores is that if Stanford elected to pay a football player such as Luke Powell, for example, then it would be in violation of Title IX if it didn't pay its female athletes the same amount.
SPORTS
December 20, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN
Two former college athletes are creating an organization to "look after the rights of major college football and basketball players." Johnny Rodgers and Dick DeVenzio announced the formation of Revenue Producing Major College Players Assn. at a news conference Thursday. They said their objective is to force NCAA universities to use money generated by football and basketball players to enhance the education and careers of those players.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1999 | KAREN E. KLEIN
As a student athlete playing baseball at Cal State Fullerton, Sergio Brown was too busy with games and practices to hold a part-time job. Desperate for cash, he started working occasional weekends parking cars and setting up special events. Before long, he was joined by teammates also crunched for time and money. Soon Brown had the beginnings of a business, supplying staff for conferences, dog shows, corporate functions, private parties and special events for nonprofit organizations.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Mark Brilliant
The NCAA must be feeling a bit like Dr. Frankenstein these days: assailed by college football and men's basketball players who reject the NCAA's precious, but mostly mythic, notion that they are student-athletes. At Northwestern University, a group of football players scored a first-round victory before the National Labor Relations Board in a campaign to be recognized as "employees" eligible to unionize. For some college football fans, this evokes disturbing images of burly 18- to 22-year-old player-proletarians marching on picket lines instead of lined up on offensive or defensive lines, much less seated in classrooms.
SPORTS
April 6, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
ARLINGTON, Texas -- NCAA President Mark Emmert said Sunday that unionizing students is a “ridiculous idea” to solving the problems of intercollegiate athletics. “It would blow up everything about the collegiate model of athletics,” Emmert said during a morning press conference at AT&T Stadium. “There are some people who think that might be fine. I don't think that represents the views of anybody up here right now.” Northwestern football players recently received regional clearance from the National Labor Relations Board to unionize as they seek more benefits for student athletes.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The group behind the effort to unionize Northwestern athletes isn't interested in advocating for salaries for them. In a forum at the Aspen Institute in Washington on Thursday, College Athletes Players Assn. President Ramogi Huma refuted the notion that the group wants pay for play. “And that's not part of our agenda,” Huma said, according to the event's transcript. “That's one reason why we're here in Washington, D.C. This is not about salary.” Last month, a regional director of the National Labor Relations Board ruled that Northwestern athletes are university employees and have the right to form a union.
SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Former Northwestern quarterback Kain Colter and Ramogi Huma, the founder and president of the National College Players Assn., will meet with members of Congress on Wednesday in preparation for an appeal of a ruling that full scholarship athletes at Northwestern can form a union. “The goal is to make athletes have a seat at the table. Health and safety of athletes is the concern, especially to reduce the risk of brain trauma,” Huma told the Associated Press. “We want to make sure they have an opportunity to hear from us directly.” Colter and Huma were expected to meet with California Rep. George Miller (D-Martinez)
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
Northwestern football players qualify under federal law as employees of the university and, therefore, can legally form the nation's first college athletes' union, the National Labor Relations Board announced Wednesday. “We had both the facts and the law on our side,” Gary Kohlman, the attorney representing the players, said in a telephone interview with Bloomberg News. It's a stunning ruling, but hardly the final one on the matter. Northwestern has already announced plans to appeal the ruling by National Labor Relations Board regional director Peter Ohr to the full NLRB in Washington, D.C. After that, it probably will go through appellate courts and even the Supreme Court if necessary.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Chris Feliciano Arnold, guest blogger
The NCAA basketball tournament field is set, and this week an estimated 50 million people will fill out their brackets in a fit of March Madness. Yet almost a year after fans witnessed one of the worst in-game injuries in a generation, college athletes are still fighting for basic healthcare guarantees from the institutions that profit from their sweat and blood. Broken bones come with the territory at high levels of competition, but you know an injury is uniquely awful when the player receives consolatory phone calls from Kobe Bryant, Kevin Durant and Michelle Obama.
SPORTS
January 15, 1990 | MIKE LITTWIN, BALTIMORE SUN
The war on drugs marches ever forward. Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, the former drug-running dictator, is safely held in a Florida lockup. U.S. warships are heading for the coast of Colombia. And now we are aiming our sights at the American college campus, where, apparently, football players are the next target. Now, I'm not naive. I know all about college kids, having been one once myself. Given the chance, they swallow goldfish. They throw up at parties.
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By David Wharton
The teams invited to March Madness might be celebrating, but researchers who monitor academic performance among college athletes are not so thrilled. A study released Monday by the University of Central Florida suggests that, even though the NCAA continues to push for academic progress, the country's top basketball programs are not showing much improvement in the classroom. "This year we seemed to be treading water instead of moving ahead," said Richard Lapchick of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport.
SPORTS
February 27, 2014 | Nathan Fenno
Electronic Arts Sports and the Collegiate Licensing Co. wanted to use the names and likenesses of college athletes in video games, according to an NCAA document unsealed in federal court Wednesday. The report was among hundreds of pages of documents that U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken ordered to be made fully or partially public in the long-running antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA fronted by former UCLA basketball player Ed O'Bannon. The case is scheduled for trial in June and, in the interim, the document dump provides another window into the often contentious issues of amateurism and compensation raised by the case.
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