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NEWS
August 20, 1999 | ROY RIVENBURG
Wetsuits and Ties: In the old days, all you needed to surf was a good board and a decent wave. But in today's global economy--with corporate downsizing of waves and talk of a possible merger between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans--surfing is much more competitive. You need a college degree. Fortunately, the University of Plymouth in England is now offering a bachelor of science degree in "surf science and technology." We're not lying.
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OPINION
March 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Less than a decade after it started requiring students to write an essay as part of the SAT, the College Board announced Wednesday that it is eliminating that portion of the test. At the same time, it will do away with certain obscure vocabulary words and the penalty for inaccurate guesses. These are good moves, but they don't answer the fundamental question of whether the standardized test should continue to be a part of the college application process, especially after a new study found that it is a poor predictor of whether students will succeed in college.
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NEWS
October 29, 1987 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Eighty-nine candidates, including 27 incumbents, are seeking election to seats on 16 Southeast Los Angeles County school and community college boards on Tuesday. Issues range from the seemingly trivial--like the need for towels after gym class at one school--to more weighty problems of drug abuse, spending and fluctuating school enrollments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Jason Song, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Gov. Jerry Brown has named one new member to the governing board of the state's community college system while also reappointing another to an additional term, officials announced Monday. Cecilia Estolano is an attorney who was also the chief executive at the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency. If confirmed by state legislators, she will serve her first term on the state board.  Geoffrey L. Baum is the director of communications and public affairs at the Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands and was the president of the Pasadena Area Community College District Governing Board.
OPINION
February 19, 2013
It would probably be better for the Los Angeles Community College District if endorsements like this one weren't necessary. That is to say, if the trustees of the community colleges were no longer elected but appointed. Because elections have not served the colleges well. For one thing, the position of trustee is so obscure that it attracts few high-caliber candidates. For another, voters are disengaged and uninformed about the community colleges, which means that unions, employees and the construction industry - the main campaign donors - have too strong a role in who is elected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1986
The Trustees of the Santa Clarita Valley College District are concerned about a proposed reorganization of the system of governance for local community colleges which would replace elected boards with appointed advisers. This proposal, the so-called Alternative A of the Commission for the Review of the Master Plan for Higher Education, would wipe out the 70 elected community college boards of trustees and replace them with 12 regional districts without regard to community identity or autonomy.
NEWS
March 13, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
When the University of California Board of Regents gathers today in San Francisco for its monthly meeting, two of the 26 seats around the board's ring-shaped table will be assigned to no one. Septuagenarians Dean Watkins and Glenn Campbell finished their board terms last month--having served 27 and 28 years, respectively--and Gov. Pete Wilson has yet to name their replacements. In the short term, the vacancies have raised hopes among affirmative action supporters.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is the essence of academic excellence, breezing through calculus, steam-rolling through trigonometry. He aced his College Boards--not only the SAT but the three achievement tests in math, writing and physics as well. He is one of only 71 California high school students named a candidate for the 2001 Presidential Scholarship, among the nation's most prestigious academic awards. But, most amazing of all, Trevor Loflin did it all while homeless.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1989
Two decisions by the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees were reported side by side (Feb. 13). One, rejecting a request to hold the San Fernando Valley Fair on the Pierce College campus, was rational and politically brave. The second, to begin construction on Mission College, was wasteful and politically expedient. We must face the fact that in 1947, when Pierce College was opened primarily as an agricultural college, the land usage of the western San Fernando Valley was decidedly different than it is today.
NEWS
November 15, 1987
Pomona College has several reasons for celebrating. It was listed in a recent U. S. News & World Report magazine as one of the top 10 private liberal arts colleges in the country and the only one of the 10 in the West. During the past year it ranked at or near the top in several other academic surveys and was named the standout "cool liberal arts college" by Rolling Stone magazine last March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The rise in tuition at public colleges slowed this year to the smallest increase in more than three decades, although financial aid has not kept pace to cover the hikes, according to a College Board study released Wednesday. At public four-year colleges and universities across the country, the average price for tuition and fees rose 2.9% this year - the smallest annual rise in 38 years - to $8,893 for in-state students, the report said. Room and board adds about $9,500. However, analysts urged students and families to pay closer attention to what they described as the more important figure: the net average cost after grants, tax credits and deductions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - A panel overseeing the 85,000-student City College of San Francisco on Wednesday moved to revoke the institution's accreditation effective July 2014, setting in motion a radical effort by stunned state and city officials to rescue the two-year school. The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges last year had demanded that City College - a 78-year-old multi-campus system that is one of the country's largest - "show cause" as to why it should remain accredited, citing a litany of financial, governance and administrative problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Dalina Castellanos
A top-performing Los Angeles school is one of three in the nation to receive a $25,000 award to encourage low-income students to seek higher education by expanding access to courses that will better prepare students to go to college. The Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies, more commonly known as LACES, was named a Gaston Caperton Inspiration Award school by the College Board on Wednesday. The money will help add a class period to reduce the overall class size, resulting in more student-teacher time and preparing students to enroll in advanced placement courses, Principal Harold Boger said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
The vast Los Angeles Community College District will gain experience and potentially greater political clout with wins by a past college president and a veteran state lawmaker to the Board of Trustees in this week's elections. But the results are not likely to radically alter the direction of an overburdened system that is the entry point for thousands of college students each year. Former East Los Angeles College president Ernest Henry Moreno and termed-out Monterey Park Democratic Assemblyman Mike Eng won solid majorities in unofficial results posted Wednesday.
OPINION
March 3, 2013
Voting may be the ultimate act of optimism. If it can't help, why bother? People who go to the polls are investing in the future of their city, asserting by their action that there is a choice to be made and that the choice is consequential. But voting counts regardless of who prevails. The victors cannot help but take careful note of just who put them in office, and who can keep them there if they perform well - or throw them out if they don't. A high turnout sends the message that voters are on duty and paying attention, regardless of how much money was donated by interest groups looking for favors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees faces a host of immediate and pressing issues this spring, chief among them: the selection of a new chancellor, budget uncertainty and increasing pressure to move struggling students more quickly through the two-year schools. Nine candidates are vying for three seats on the board in the March 5 election. One incumbent, Nancy Pearlman, is seeking to retain Seat 6, while Tina Park in Seat 2 and Kelly Candaele in Seat 4 did not seek reelection.
SPORTS
April 12, 1987 | JOE CIALINI, United Press International
The 10th annual McDonald's All American High School Basketball Game will be a homecoming of sorts at the Spectrum, where the first game was played in 1978. Today's game will also be a homecoming for forward Brian Shorter, who left Philadelphia last fall to attend Oak Hill Academy in Mouth of Wilson, Va. "It's really special for me," said the 6-7 Shorter, who averaged 24 points and 14 rebounds per game this season to be named to the McDonald's All-American team.
OPINION
January 22, 2013
The Los Angeles Times editorial board has invited each of the 77 candidates for 17 Los Angeles city, school district and community college district offices on the March 5 ballot to meet and discuss their candidacies as the board considers endorsements. To make our recommendations , the board goes beyond our face-to-face discussions and studies the candidates, the districts and the issues and weighs them against the needs of the city. Editorial writers offer some thoughts and questions about the contests in our blog, Opinion L.A. , and we invite readers to share their thinking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
More students in the Los Angeles Unified School District took and passed an Advanced Placement exam last year, reflecting a rise in success on the college-level tests in California and nationwide. A record number of students took AP exams in 2012 - nearly one-third of high school graduates nationwide took at least one of the tests and nearly one in five had passing scores, according to a report released Wednesday by the College Board, the New York nonprofit that administers the exams.
OPINION
February 19, 2013
It would probably be better for the Los Angeles Community College District if endorsements like this one weren't necessary. That is to say, if the trustees of the community colleges were no longer elected but appointed. Because elections have not served the colleges well. For one thing, the position of trustee is so obscure that it attracts few high-caliber candidates. For another, voters are disengaged and uninformed about the community colleges, which means that unions, employees and the construction industry - the main campaign donors - have too strong a role in who is elected.
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