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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
A large number of California adults have attended college but have not managed to obtain a degree, according to a new report released Tuesday. Nearly 22.5% of the state's 20.2 million adults age 25 to 64 have attended college and have earned credits but no degree, according to the report by the nonprofit Lumina Foundation. That number, about 4.5 million adults, exceeds those who have obtained a bachelor's degree (about 4.1 million) and high school graduates (nearly 4.1 million.)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
A large number of California adults have attended college but have not managed to obtain a degree, according to a new report released Tuesday. Nearly 22.5% of the state's 20.2 million adults age 25 to 64 have attended college and have earned credits but no degree, according to the report by the nonprofit Lumina Foundation. That number, about 4.5 million adults, exceeds those who have obtained a bachelor's degree (about 4.1 million) and high school graduates (nearly 4.1 million.)
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Navigating the job market without a college degree is harder than ever, but there are still plenty of solid jobs to be had, according to a new report. Some 29 million jobs with annual salaries of more than $35,000 exist for those who haven't finished college, according to a report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. That's one in every five jobs. Of those, 11 million jobs pay $50,000 or more a year. Of all so-called middle jobs, roughly half are office jobs, a third are blue-collar positions and the rest are roles in healthcare and technical occupations.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Colleague Don Lee wrote a piece in Tuesday's L.A. Times about a new Pew Research Center study, "The Rising Cost of Not Going to College ," that finds getting a college education is still the best path to a financially successful life, the current economy notwithstanding. Of course, no one - especially poll takers, who measure the present and the past - can predict the future. But the Pew findings are pretty compelling, even as they obscure a more significant point: The benefits of a higher education aren't limited to a paycheck.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | IRENE CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hsi Lai Temple, the largest Buddhist monastery in the Western Hemisphere, will begin offering bachelor's and master's degrees next year, becoming one of a handful of Buddhist organizations licensed by the state to confer college degrees. State education officials earlier this month gave permission to the 2-year-old temple to open a private school that will grant bachelor's degrees in Buddhist studies and master's degrees in religious studies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Justin Clark's mother held his hand when she walked him to his first class at Antelope Valley College in Lancaster three years ago. On Friday night, Justin, 13, donned a cap and gown and joined his fellow students in commencement exercises to become the youngest student ever to receive a degree from the college, earning high honors to boot, school officials said.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1997 | From Reuters
Lou Glazer of Michigan Future Inc. often tells audiences about good-paying jobs that do not require a college degree. However, audiences are generally skeptical. "They tell me, 'There is no such thing,' " he said. Yet when he speaks with employers, they tell him, "We have lots of skills and trade jobs," which pay better than occupations requiring a college degree, "and very few people capable of doing them." So Glazer's Ann Arbor, Mich.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Young workers start their careers with great hope but are quickly disillusioned, and by the time they reach 30, most feel they're getting a raw deal in the new economy, according to results of a national poll released Tuesday. The poll, conducted in June for the AFL-CIO by Peter D. Hart Research Associates, also found an enormous gap in income and attitudes between young white workers and Latinos and African Americans, even when comparing workers with college degrees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two 13-year-old girls who went from grade school right into college are preparing to graduate--with honors--from Antelope Valley College in Lancaster. The girls, who will share the stage Saturday as they accept their diplomas, will be easy to tell apart. Christina Brown of Palmdale will be dressed in a conservative suit and boots. Victoria Simiele of Littlerock plans to wear tennis shoes with a sleeveless pantsuit and spike her hair, which has tips dyed blue, purple and green.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
CASPER, Wyo. - These are boom times in the resource-rich Cowboy State, courtesy of an oil explosion whose ripples can be felt across the land. Good-paying blue-collar jobs in the petroleum and natural gas fields are as plentiful as pickups here, and the unemployment rate - 4.6% in July - remains far below the 7.4% national average. But critics worry that the prodigious oil output includes a potential byproduct. Despite such fast-dollar success, heavy reliance on a single industry known for its dramatic downturns could one day help paint the state into a precarious financial corner, they say. Many fear the day when Wyoming's oil market fails, as it last did in the mid-1980s, exposing a fundamental flaw in the state's job picture: The lure of the oil dollar has prompted teenagers to skip college, or abandon high school, for the petroleum fields - many without a Plan B if things go bust.
OPINION
December 27, 2013 | By Richard Riordan and Eli Broad
Is it a sin to be rich? Not if your resources are used to help others and create jobs. If you listen to most of the discussions of income inequality, it certainly seems like affluence itself is a crime. We hear increasing calls for higher taxes on the wealthy and other policies designed to redistribute income. President Obama summed up that position when he said, "Our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. " The assumption behind these proposals is that a minority of Americans has become rich by making a majority of our people poorer.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
CASPER, Wyo. - These are boom times in the resource-rich Cowboy State, courtesy of an oil explosion whose ripples can be felt across the land. Good-paying blue-collar jobs in the petroleum and natural gas fields are as plentiful as pickups here, and the unemployment rate - 4.6% in July - remains far below the 7.4% national average. But critics worry that the prodigious oil output includes a potential byproduct. Despite such fast-dollar success, heavy reliance on a single industry known for its dramatic downturns could one day help paint the state into a precarious financial corner, they say. Many fear the day when Wyoming's oil market fails, as it last did in the mid-1980s, exposing a fundamental flaw in the state's job picture: The lure of the oil dollar has prompted teenagers to skip college, or abandon high school, for the petroleum fields - many without a Plan B if things go bust.
OPINION
September 19, 2013
Re "No repeat offenders," Opinion, Sept. 16 Lois Davis makes an excellent point: Rehabilitation programs in prison can reduce recidivism. I have had the honor of helping my friend, a lawyer who represents prisoners serving life sentences at their parole hearings. These men and women were fortunate in that they could take advantage of educational, vocational, spiritual and self-help programs while incarcerated. I have seen firsthand the positive impact of correctional education programs.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
How do you move up the economic ladder? Go to college and get married. That's the upshot of a study released Tuesday that analyzes the major factors helping to push Americans up - or down - the economic scale. The study by the Pew Charitable Trusts underscores the dramatic role that factors such as education play in what's known as economic mobility, the ability of people to financially surpass their parents. Consider, for example, single black mothers. IN-DEPTH: Five key takeaways on America's housing market Among those with college degrees, 83% climbed the income ladder compared to their parents, according to the study.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2013 | By Shan Li
The pay gap between men and women has been a subject of debate for decades. But a new survey reveals a clue to the discrepancy: the number of hours worked by men with full-time jobs versus women in full-time positions. On average, men log 8.46 hours a day versus the 7.87 hours worked by women, according to a recent Labor Department American Time Use Survey . However, that difference is flipped when it comes to part-time gigs. In those positions, women work 5.29 hours per day compared with men, who put in 5.16 hours.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Seven out of 10 workers have "checked out" at work or are "actively disengaged," according to a recent Gallup survey .  In its ongoing survey of the American workplace, Gallup found that only 30% of workers are "were engaged, or involved in, enthusiastic about, and committed to their workplace. " Although that equals the high in engagement since Gallup began studying the issue in 2000, it is overshadowed by the number of workers who aren't committed to a performing at a high level -- which Gallup says costs companies money.
OPINION
April 1, 2012
With so many scientific issues becoming battlefields in the culture wars - from climate change to stem-cell research to evolution (see above) - we hardly needed a new study to tell us that scientists have become a favorite target of the right. Yet a paper written by University of North Carolina doctoral fellow Gordon Gauchat and published last week in the American Sociological Review also contains a highly counterintuitive finding. Common sense, as well as past research, suggests that distrust of science correlates with lack of education; the less education a person has, the more likely he or she will favor traditional beliefs or religious dogma over scientific evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Robert J. Lopez
Three men linked to a shooting near Santa Monica College that left one man dead and another victim critically wounded are due in court Thursday. Christopher Chonan Osumi, 19 and Meliton Lorenzo Lopez, 23, were arrested Wednesday on suspicion of murder and were being held in lieu of $1-million bail. Noah Jason Farris, 32 , was arrested for allegedly being an accessory to a felony. Farris served time in state prison and was under the supervision of county probation authorities, police said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez and Joseph Serna
A police search of an Orange Line bus turned up two robbery suspects late Wednesday, authorities said. After receiving a report of at least one armed man on board the bus in the Valley Village area, officers surrounded the vehicle and ordered passengers to exit, Los Angeles police said Thursday. Television images showed the passengers standing outside the bus as officers searched the vehicle. The search led to two robbery suspects, one of them armed with a gun, police said.
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