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September 24, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
Five things to watch this week in college football. 1: UCLA fans need to erase that easy "W" they had penciled in for the Sept. 29 game at Colorado. What looked like a picnic at Pikes Peak should be filled with some trepidation now that UCLA is the team coming in after a loss and Colorado is the team coming in after a win. 2: The Big Ten, which has been sliding from national relevancy since No.1 Ohio State and No.2 Michigan met in 2006, could use a pick-me-up showdown after last weekend's poor group effort.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Chris Foster
UCLA quarterback Brett Hundley was a bit flustered, something opposing defenses might not be able to cause this fall. Asked how the college football world will greet the Bruins when they return for August training camp, Hundley said, "Great question. With open arms?" Hundley turned serious, "That's a tough question to answer because what I expect is different from what everyone else will expect of us. " Actually, not so much. The bar will be set high for UCLA entering the 2014 season … in the locker room and in the public's eye. "We definitely should be considered as a big-time program," said linebacker Myles Jack.
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SPORTS
August 18, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
The Big 12 is thrilled to welcome in West Virginia and is betting the Mountaineers fit like a cork in a jug. The Big East demanded $20 million in early-exit fees from West Virginia as it reminded everyone the school's early nickname was "the Snakes. " Conference realignment has become a combat sport, but out of the Shenandoah Valley this too shall pass. The Big East named a new commissioner this week as it tries to regain its bearings. West Virginia hired a new travel agent as it readies for trips to Lubbock, Stillwater and Ames.
SPORTS
April 22, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
When it comes to best senior receiver in Southern California this fall, the college football recruiters are saying that Equanimeous St. Brown of Anaheim Servite is No. 1. UCLA is the latest to offer the 6-foot-5 St. Brown, joining USC, Notre Dame, Arizona State, Colorado, Stanford and Tennessee, among others. St. Brown caught 42 passes for 725 yards and six touchdowns as a junior. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
SPORTS
October 20, 2011 | Chris Dufresne
Break out the chips and cold drinks, but let Chris Dufresne handle the remote. Each Friday, The Times' national college football writer handicaps what's worth watching, and skipping, on Saturday's menu of games: MORNING No. 6 Oklahoma State (6-0) at Missouri (3-3) 9 a.m., FX Excitement meets disappointment on the prairie in a game that will be in the peripheral vision of St. Louis Cardinals fans absorbed in the World Series. Oklahoma State is in the thick of title contention, opening at No. 4 in the first Bowl Championship Series standings, and Missouri is trying to pick up the pieces after a 2-3 start.
SPORTS
September 18, 2010 | Chris Dufresne
It was not a day to play nice. With two precious national title game spots up for bid, and so many voters to impress, the schools taking this season seriously got serious Saturday. Top-ranked Alabama said "put up your dukes," but Duke couldn't. The Crimson Tide rolled into Durham and recorded a basketball score in the den of the defending NCAA hoops champions. The 62 points Alabama scored against Duke, which contributed 13, were the most the team has scored in 19 years.
SPORTS
November 20, 2010 | Chris Dufresne
Unbuckling the mailbag: Question: Why wasn't Oregon punished for a close win like Texas Christian was? Michael Keith Wells Branch, Texas Answer: Because Ducks are higher on the food chain than Horned Frogs. Major college contenders always get the benefit of the doubt versus "non-AQ" schools. It's the performance mulligan you earn for playing in one of the top conferences ? and it's fair. What's not fair is to say schools such as Boise State and TCU get free rides because they play in weaker conferences.
SPORTS
April 20, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
College football recruiters have their GPS devices powered on as they begin visiting high schools to evaluate players over the next month. Let me provide a few suggestions on players who have been overlooked so far. Maybe they don't fit a height-weight requirement. Maybe they were injured last season. Maybe they don't participate in seven-on-seven all-star passing tournaments. Maybe they play multiple sports. Whatever the reason for not receiving early buzz, these players will be standouts in the fall, and it's far more relevant how someone performs in a real game compared with how they look running around a red cone.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Mark Brilliant
The NCAA must be feeling a bit like Dr. Frankenstein these days: assailed by college football and men's basketball players who reject the NCAA's precious, but mostly mythic, notion that they are student-athletes. At Northwestern University, a group of football players scored a first-round victory before the National Labor Relations Board in a campaign to be recognized as "employees" eligible to unionize. For some college football fans, this evokes disturbing images of burly 18- to 22-year-old player-proletarians marching on picket lines instead of lined up on offensive or defensive lines, much less seated in classrooms.
SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 The days are nearing when Koa Farmer of Sherman Oaks Notre Dame will be boarding a plane to head for Penn State and begin his college football days, but this spring, he's trying to get faster. On Thursday in dual meet against Crespi, Farmer won the 100 meters in 10.93 seconds and the 200 in 22.03. Farmer was Notre Dame's standout defensive back-receiver in football. The Knights continue to show good depth in the shot put. Deion Dayao won with an effort of 55-3, and freshman Kylan Wilborn had a mark of 53-2.
OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
University officials and the NCAA have been reluctant to acknowledge that top-tier college football programs are run these days less as athletic programs than as businesses. But a labor administrator's decision Wednesday that Northwestern University's scholarship football players are, in fact, employees with the right to unionize should get their attention. This issue has been bubbling for decades as major sports programs evolved from important but ancillary parts of a college's mission into powerful businesses enriched by multimillion-dollar TV contracts and merchandising revenue, all built on the labor of student-athletes who received no compensation beyond scholarships.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Northwestern University football players have the right to form a union, a regional director of the National Labor Relations Board ruled Wednesday, setting the stage for potential dramatic change to the college sports landscape. Peter Sung Ohr, in Chicago, ruled that "players receiving scholarships from the employer are 'employees'" and ordered that an election be conducted to determine whether Northwestern players wanted representation by the College Athletes Players Assn. for the purposes of collective bargaining.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Former USC football stars Tony Boselli, Mark Carrier and Keyshawn Johnson are among players on the ballot for the College Football Hall of Fame, it was announced Thursday. The three are among 75 players and six coaches from major college programs on the ballot. The 2014 class will be announced in May. Boselli, an offensive tackle, won All-America recognition in 1992 and 1994. He was selected by the Jacksonville Jaguars with the second pick in the 1995 NFL draft. Carrier also was a two-time All-American and won the Thorpe Award as college football's top defensive back in 1989.
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
The most polarizing proposal in recent college football history was tabled Wednesday, as in shelved, one day before a NCAA rules committee was going to vote on the controversial pace-of-play issue. The rule would have penalized a team for snapping the ball in the first 10 seconds of the 40 second clock. The irony is the penalty would have been for delay of game. There is nothing inherently wrong with studying whether or not up-tempo offenses pose a player safety concern.
SPORTS
March 2, 2014 | By Gary Klein and Chris Foster
Time appears to be running out on one of the most controversial issues of college football's off-season. The NCAA Football Rules Committee last month began considering a proposal that would penalize teams for snapping the ball before 10 seconds have elapsed on the 40-second play clock. The proposed rule, which would allow for defensive substitutions, would not affect the last two minutes of each half. The proposal, initially trumpeted as a safety issue to protect players from injury, caught most college football coaches off guard.
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