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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange lawyer convicted of stealing from his clients to pay his gambling debts was sentenced Friday to eight years in state prison and ordered to repay more than $300,000 to his victims. After asking unsuccessfully to delay sentencing for two weeks so he could care for his ailing wife, who was also convicted in the thefts, attorney Leonard Basinger, 56, was taken into custody in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of March 23 - 29, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies   SERIES Last Man Standing Mandy (Molly Ephraim) decides she wants to quit school and use her college fund to launch her own clothing line. Of course, Mike (Tim Allen) doesn't like this idea. 8 p.m. ABC Rake A powerful agent (Peter Jacobson) accuses Mikki's (Bojana Novakovic)
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NATIONAL
March 9, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Negro College Fund said it would provide Morris Brown College with $1.47 million to help it overcome a $27-million debt and avoid closing. The fund voted to help alleviate financial problems at the 117-year-old historically black Atlanta school, which lost its accreditation in December, officials said. The Southern Assn. of Colleges and Schools withdrew the accreditation largely because of the school's financial problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
South Carolina lawmakers voted Wednesday to cut $69,000 in funding to two public universities that had assigned gay-themed books as reading for incoming students. The books are "Fun Home" by Alison Bechdel, a finalist for the 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award, and "Out Loud: The Best of Rainbow Radio," a collection of stories broadcast on a South Carolina radio show. The University of South Carolina Upstate would lose $17,000 for assigning "Out Loud," while the College of Charleston would lose $52,000 for assigning Bechdel's "Fun Home," a memoir told in graphic novel form, to incoming freshmen.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | Associated Press
Rep. William H. Gray III (D-Pa.), the highest ranking black member of Congress, announced Thursday that he will resign to head the United Negro College Fund. Gray, who is House majority whip, joined college fund officials at a news conference to confirm rumors that had been circulating in Washington. The congressman said he will complete the current House session, set to end Aug. 5, and begin his new job Sept. 3. Among senior Democrats already campaigning for Gray's leadership post are David E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS
William H. Gray III wants to see a show of hands. "How many of you believe there are more black people in prison than in college?" he asks. Some hands shoot up. "You're wrong." "How about black men?" More hands go up. "You're wrong again." Statistics roll off the tongue of the Baptist preacher who was once the most powerful African American in Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Expanding its ever-growing network of scholarships, the United Negro College Fund on Tuesday announced a new partnership with Coca-Cola that will offer black or Latino students paid summer internships and $5,000 scholarships. Fourteen college students across the nation have been selected for the first year of the $1.2-million scholarship program financed by Coca-Cola.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1992 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pledging to help rebuild Los Angeles by giving youths a chance for an education, the United Negro College Fund announced Friday the creation of a $5-million endowment fund to assist young people who otherwise could not afford college. William H. Gray, president of the fund, joined Mayor Tom Bradley and more than two dozen local educators and business leaders at Dorsey High School in Los Angeles to launch a fund-raising campaign for the "Ladders of Hope" program.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2012 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I have a high-interest car loan (more than 10%) and just landed a part-time job to add to my full-time cash flow. I want to pay the car off as quickly as possible, but I have read and been told that paying a loan off early doesn't help scores as much as paying the duration of the loan. Is there truth to this? It seems foolish, though, since won't I be paying more interest? Answer: The primary concern with paying off a loan is that the lender may stop reporting the account to the credit bureaus.
BUSINESS
December 30, 1997 | LYNDA NATALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Money Make-Over feature was inaugurated with The Times' Wall Street, California pages last year with the idea that real-life experience would be a powerful teacher, and that the professional advice offered in each case could benefit the public as much as the individual or couple directly involved. Make-Over subjects have been a diverse group facing varied challenges. For some, it was overspending or unrealistic goals or career setbacks or family situations.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: My husband and I have been putting 5% and 6%, respectively, into our 401(k) accounts to get our full company matches. We're also maxing out our Roth IRAs. The CPA who does our taxes recommended that we put more money into our 401(k)s even if that would mean putting less into our Roth IRAs. We're also expecting our first child, and our CPA said he doesn't like 529 plans. What's your opinion on us increasing our 401(k)s by the amount we'd intended to put into a 529, while still maxing out our Roths, and then using our Roth contributions (not earnings)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2013 | Sandy Banks
I got a clue even before my column ran this week that its subject - what "Negro" means these days - might make some folks uncomfortable. I'd pulled up to the valet stand at the Hilton and waited while the young man fumbled through the standard question about the evening's event. "You're here for the United … uh, United … uh, the College Fund dinner?" he asked. Yes. The United Negro College Fund. He'd managed to leave that word out. I understand why it flummoxed him. By the time he was born, we'd moved past that to "black" and on to "African American.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Many colleges seek donations for new construction or scholarships. Pasadena City College, however, has an additional goal that was unthinkable before California's budget crisis forced community colleges to slash course offerings. The school is seeking donations from alumni and others to restore some of the 570 classes it planned to cut this academic year. The campaign, launched in April, has received about $89,400 in donations, and the school is also devoting $106,000 from savings resulting from some cost cuts, officials said.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | By Howard Blume
Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney referred to a plan to give Massachusetts students a “tuition free” education at state schools. He is correct that it covers tuition, but students did not get a free ride. Fees, for example, and other costs were not included. Also it's worth noting that Massachusetts is a relatively high tax state, with more funding for public education. The former Massachusetts governor also referred to supporting Pell Grants, which are federal funds that support the education of the lowest-income students.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2012 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: When my cousin and I were children more than 20 years ago, my grandparents opened a college savings account for each of us. I have no idea what kind of account this was, or where it was located. My grandfather passed away a few years later. While I was in high school, my grandmother informed me the investments had not done well, and she was closing the accounts. I received a check for $500 at high school graduation that was supposed to be the balance of the account. I assumed my cousin received the same, until she recently posted on a social networking site she was thankful her grandmother started a college fund when she was young that covered the entire cost of her education.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2012 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I have a high-interest car loan (more than 10%) and just landed a part-time job to add to my full-time cash flow. I want to pay the car off as quickly as possible, but I have read and been told that paying a loan off early doesn't help scores as much as paying the duration of the loan. Is there truth to this? It seems foolish, though, since won't I be paying more interest? Answer: The primary concern with paying off a loan is that the lender may stop reporting the account to the credit bureaus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2013 | Sandy Banks
I got a clue even before my column ran this week that its subject - what "Negro" means these days - might make some folks uncomfortable. I'd pulled up to the valet stand at the Hilton and waited while the young man fumbled through the standard question about the evening's event. "You're here for the United … uh, United … uh, the College Fund dinner?" he asked. Yes. The United Negro College Fund. He'd managed to leave that word out. I understand why it flummoxed him. By the time he was born, we'd moved past that to "black" and on to "African American.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2011 | Sandy Banks
Heavynle Ceasar headed to New York for college last week. She took one big suitcase, a tiny heart-shaped pillow for the flight and the boundless good wishes of countless strangers whose gifts are helping ease her passage through grief. Heavynle is the Lawndale teenager I wrote about in June after she lost both her parents in one torturous moment: One week before her prom, two months from graduation, Heavynle's father shot her mother to death and then killed himself in the family's condo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2011 | Sandy Banks
Heavynle Ceasar headed to New York for college last week. She took one big suitcase, a tiny heart-shaped pillow for the flight and the boundless good wishes of countless strangers whose gifts are helping ease her passage through grief. Heavynle is the Lawndale teenager I wrote about in June after she lost both her parents in one torturous moment: One week before her prom, two months from graduation, Heavynle's father shot her mother to death and then killed himself in the family's condo.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2011 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
Families investing in California's college-saving plan soon may have lower average fees and a new lineup of fund options. The state board that oversees the ScholarShare program selected investment giant TIAA-CREF, a big manager of retirement accounts for teachers and others working in education, to manage the so-called 529 plan. The New York firm would replace Boston-based Fidelity Investments. Fidelity did not submit a bid to continue running ScholarShare, which has assets totaling $4.4 billion across 291,000 accounts.
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