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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2008 | Carla Rivera
Four college students were killed Saturday when their car collided with an oncoming vehicle on a two-lane Napa Valley highway, the California Highway Patrol said. The victims, who were pronounced dead at the scene, were identified as Boaz Pak, 20, Luke Nishikawa, 22, Simon Son, 19, and Chong Shin, 20. All attended Pacific Union College, a four-year liberal arts school in Angwin, a small town in the hills above Napa Valley. The four were in a Honda Civic that was struck by a Toyota pickup truck.
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NATIONAL
March 9, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, among the nation's largest and most storied college fraternities, eliminated the controversial “pledging” process Sunday, saying new members once referred to as “pledges” immediately would be treated as fairly and equally as more senior brothers. In a practice common across many fraternities, new members often endure a ritual of back-breaking tasks, silly pranks and alcohol-fueled hijinks. Sometimes it rises to the level of hazing, when the welfare of pledges is put at risk.
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BUSINESS
June 29, 2008 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
If you're facing years of student loan payments but aren't making much money because you're working in public service, the federal government has some good news for you. A law that takes effect Tuesday could allow you to have some of your college debt forgiven.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A smart phone app that allows users to post messages anonymously is coming under fire for fostering cyberbullying, leading to at least two juvenile arrests, school phone-use bans and several campus lockdowns. Scrutiny of the 4-month-old   Yik Yak app   for Android and Apple devices has spread from the Southeast to the Northeast to the Midwest and, this week, to the West Coast. The app has registered more than 10,000 downloads on Google's Play Store and, according to   AppAnnie , has cracked the top 100 most popular apps on Apple's App Store.
NEWS
December 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
A man was convicted Friday of beating his parents to death after his mother found out he was flunking out of college. After four days of deliberations, a jury found 20-year-old Alex Valentine guilty of murder in the August 1996 slayings of his parents. He faces a life prison term without the possibility of parole when he is sentenced Feb. 11. The battered bodies of Diane Valentine, 55, and Kenneth Valentine, 51, were found inside their water purification systems business in Mira Mesa.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
A student upset about not getting an academic honor shot four persons to death Friday at the University of Iowa before fatally shooting himself, a school official said. The dead included faculty members and the student who had won the honor. Two others were critically wounded, authorities said. The gunman was identified as Gang Lu, a graduate student in physics from China, Ann Rhodes, vice president of university affairs, said.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | TRACY WOOD and RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The route from USC's fraternity row to the 901 Club on Figueroa Street is marked by broad painted stripes running three blocks, a symbol of the bar's importance to the social life of the campus' affluent "Greeks." The "9-Oh," as the raucous college bar is affectionately known, is where inhibitions, like IDs, are checked at the door. For one fraternity--the prestigious and well-connected Alpha Tau Omega house--it is a path well traveled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1995
There's a dorm brewing at Cal Poly Pomona. Literally. University housing officials are pondering the student trend of brewing beer in tiny dormitory rooms. Call them micro-microbreweries. The issue foamed into an outrage after a housing coordinator told students the beer had to go. Then it fizzled out when university housing director Ali Rahmani met with the students and decided to let the practice continue--for now. "The jury is still out," he said.
OPINION
October 21, 2012
Re "Crowded colleges," Letters, Oct. 18 A letter writer calls for eliminating physical education at community colleges in favor of "academics. " After teaching PE and health for 38 years, I have to respond. Half of my students were obese or eating their way there. Diabetes, heart issues, lost work time due to illness and self-esteem issues can be headed off by a well taught PE class aimed at lifetime skills. I one asked my health class students how many of them used algebra or a foreign language in the past year; few did. Then I asked how many knew an alcoholic or drug addict, lost someone close to them or needed to understand proper diet; most of the hands went up. A brilliant student is a healthy student; teach both.
OPINION
June 1, 2013
Re "Uncoupling the hookup culture," Opinion, May 28 As a sexuality educator and author, I applaud Bob Laird's article. But I do have one concern. He stated that Boston University religion professor and author Donna Freitas "denigrates abstinence education. " Although she does have concerns, she has also written about its benefits. Stating that she denigrates abstinence education feeds into the terrible myths about virginity that perpetuate the hookup culture Laird decries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
Just hours before a UC Santa Barbara woman was gang raped near campus, a city college student reported being sexually assaulted in the area, an official said Tuesday. The first incident occurred Saturday night and was reported by a Santa Barbara City College student who said she was attacked by an unidentified man, said Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Kelly Hoover. Authorities said it was unclear if the rape was connected to an incident hours later, when a 19-year-old UC Santa Barbara student was gang raped by three men as she walked toward apartments in Isla Vista.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Jason Song
Danielle Alberts fell and broke her right ankle in three places in 2012. Alberts, who earns about $9,000 a year, went to the hospital and was charged nearly $4,000 for a shot and some pain medication. Alberts did not have health insurance. She refused a cast because it would have cost $500 more and she didn't have the money from her jobs as a security guard and caregiver. The ankle healed poorly, leaving her with a limp, and she wears a brace to keep the swelling down. So when the 25-year-old Los Angeles Trade Technical College student received insurance under Covered California, the state's health insurance exchange for the public, she began searching for a doctor who could help her walk normally.
OPINION
February 15, 2014
Re "History lessons, with popcorn," Opinion, Feb. 12 Zach P. Messitte is spot-on regarding the influence that films with historical backgrounds have on today's college students. Since 1991 I've been teaching at USC's School of Cinematic Arts. I've witnessed many changes there, both in technology and student attitudes, particularly when a historical incident is adapted into a film. In my generation I saw how films like "Apocalypse Now" and "The Deer Hunter" affected American audiences regarding Vietnam.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Government Accountability Office on Thursday urged more transparency in the debit card system used to electronically disburse college students' financial aid, and said that transaction fees for the cards quickly add up.   In a report , the GAO said that the use of debit cards has risen over the last decade. Though only 11% of schools in the U.S. have contracts with companies to offer the debit cards, the 852 schools that do are disproportionately large, accounting for 40% of U.S. college enrollment, according to the GAO.  Congressional investigators said that though fees on the debit cards are comparable to conventional bank-issued cards, two large companies charge fees for purchases made using a personal identification number, or PIN. Those charges can quickly accumulate.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
About a third of California college students report being uninsured and they said the primary reason was cost, not an aura of invincibility, according to a new survey. The results released Monday are based on a poll of 836 students at three Cal State University campuses last fall in Los Angeles, Fresno and San Jose. Enrollment among young people remains a top priority for government exchanges and other supporters of the healthcare law. The new insurance marketplaces need enough healthier policyholders to offset the costs of sicker, older customers.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By a Times staff writer
Airfares to some parts of Florida this high season have climbed well above $500, so here's a bargain round-trip fare from LAX to Fort Lauderdale on Virgin America for $240, including all taxes and fees. Fort Lauderdale's reputation as a spring-break city for college students dates to 1935, when collegiate swimmers trained there to stay in shape during the Christmas break. Word spread about the town and soon college students were coming to do more than just swim. The crowds that grew unruly in the 1980s, however, are a thing of the past, thanks to stricter laws and code enforcement.
OPINION
January 31, 2012 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
In his State of the Union address last Tuesday, President Obama proposed several measures to lower college tuition. University leaders responded cautiously, warning that cost-cutting reforms might also cut into instructional quality. But here's the big open secret in American higher education: Most institutions have no meaningful way to measure the quality of their instruction. And the president didn't ask us to develop one, either. Instead, he suggested that the federal government tie student aid to colleges' success in reducing tuition and in helping students move forward.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
A college campus may not be the best place to find conservative support, but Mitt Romney did his best at Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., on Monday, deflecting questions about Planned Parenthood and birth control to rally the crowd by promising economic freedom and lower gas prices. Standing in shirt sleeves in front of an academic hall flanked by blooming magnolias, Romney repeated again and again his pledge to improve the economy by loosening regulations, lowering taxes and encouraging entrepreneurship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2014 | By Jason Felch
President Obama vowed Wednesday to combat sexual assault on college campuses, telling the estimated one in five women who are raped in college, “I have your back.” Flanked by senior members of his cabinet at a White House news conference, Obama signed a presidential memorandum establishing a task force to recommend policy changes within 90 days to protect college students, especially women, from sexual assault. Obama credited an “inspiring wave of student-led activism” that has cast a spotlight on the issue over the past year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
California Community college students will have to meet minimum academic standards to receive financial assistance under new rules approved by the system Monday. The California Community Colleges Board of Governors voted to require that students maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA for two consecutive terms and complete at least half of their units with a D grade or better to receive a fee waiver. Community college fees are currently $46 per unit, among the lowest in the nation. Of the state's 2.6 million community college students, about 40% have their fees waived.
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