Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCollege
IN THE NEWS

College

SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Former USC football stars Tony Boselli, Mark Carrier and Keyshawn Johnson are among players on the ballot for the College Football Hall of Fame, it was announced Thursday. The three are among 75 players and six coaches from major college programs on the ballot. The 2014 class will be announced in May. Boselli, an offensive tackle, won All-America recognition in 1992 and 1994. He was selected by the Jacksonville Jaguars with the second pick in the 1995 NFL draft. Carrier also was a two-time All-American and won the Thorpe Award as college football's top defensive back in 1989.
Advertisement
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | By Chris Dufresne
The most polarizing proposal in recent college football history was tabled Wednesday, as in shelved, one day before a NCAA rules committee was going to vote on the controversial pace-of-play issue. The rule would have penalized a team for snapping the ball in the first 10 seconds of the 40 second clock. The irony is the penalty would have been for delay of game. There is nothing inherently wrong with studying whether or not up-tempo offenses pose a player safety concern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
As part of a major overhaul of the SAT college entrance exam, test-takers starting in 2016 will no longer be required to write an essay, the College Board announced Wednesday. However, an essay-writing test still will be offered, and many colleges may demand that applicants take it and submit the score. With that change, the main SAT will be condensed to two sections from the current three, and the top possible score will be 1,600, as it was for many decades. The current 2,400-point maximum was introduced with the start of the required essay seven years ago. The new optional essay test will be graded separately on a scale that is still under consideration, said officials of the College Board, which owns the widely used exam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Rising college costs are weighing more heavily on students, with increasing numbers rejecting their first choice and opting instead for the school offering a solid financial aid package, according to a UCLA survey released Wednesday. Freshmen who indicated that education costs were a "very important" factor in their college choice reached a record high of 46% -- up nearly 15 percentage points since 2004, according to the survey of the nation's first-year students conducted by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute . Only 57% of students enrolled in their first-choice campus in 2013, the lowest level since the item was first measured in 1974.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
Changes announced Wednesday to the SAT college entrance exam don't necessarily mean all test takers will avoid writing essays. The College Board announced that takers will no longer be required to write an essay beginning in 2016. But essay-writing tests will still be offered, and many colleges may demand that applicants take it and submit the score. The essay requirement drop will pose a dilemma for many colleges, especially for the University of California system, which is the single-largest customer of the SAT. UC administrators 10 years ago pushed and won a previous set of reforms in the SAT, including the addition of the essay, which is a 25-minute, handwritten exercise at the exam's start.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
In a major overhaul of the SAT college entrance exam, students starting in 2016 will no longer be required to write an essay, will not be penalized for wrong answers and will not be able to freely use calculators. The College Board announcement Wednesday shook up a test that is taken by about 1.7 million high school students annually and, though its influence has been waning, remains a major factor in college admission decisions nationally. The shifts, officials said, are part of an effort to better align the 88-year-old exam with what students learn in high school and to get away from any advantages they may gain from expensive private tutoring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Jason Song, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Gov. Jerry Brown has named one new member to the governing board of the state's community college system while also reappointing another to an additional term, officials announced Monday. Cecilia Estolano is an attorney who was also the chief executive at the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency. If confirmed by state legislators, she will serve her first term on the state board.  Geoffrey L. Baum is the director of communications and public affairs at the Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands and was the president of the Pasadena Area Community College District Governing Board.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Rep. Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), the former Republican vice presidential nominee, launched an attack Monday on the nation's poverty programs, provoking an election-year confrontation with the White House amid a growing focus on income inequality. Drawing on his political roots as a student of conservative anti-poverty thinkers, the House Budget Committee chairman said many aspects of the expansion of the federal safety net since President Johnson's "War on Poverty" 50 years ago were "making it worse.
SPORTS
March 2, 2014 | By Gary Klein and Chris Foster
Time appears to be running out on one of the most controversial issues of college football's off-season. The NCAA Football Rules Committee last month began considering a proposal that would penalize teams for snapping the ball before 10 seconds have elapsed on the 40-second play clock. The proposed rule, which would allow for defensive substitutions, would not affect the last two minutes of each half. The proposal, initially trumpeted as a safety issue to protect players from injury, caught most college football coaches off guard.
SPORTS
March 2, 2014 | By Chris Foster
UCLA forward David Wear laughed when asked, "Was that an identical twin moment?" Travis Wear had spotted his brother running alone up court and fired a long pass Thursday. David sank a three-pointer at the buzzer to force overtime against Oregon. "No," David said with a chuckle. "I just ran down court and we made eye contact. " The Wears are seen as a novelty at times. A pair of 6-foot-10 basketball players who all but require DNA testing to tell them apart. It has been a subject for inquisitive minds.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|