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OPINION
August 20, 2013 | By Aaron Rosen
For many college students, the semester abroad has become a rite of passage. But while many Americans study abroad for a semester or two, it is a rarity for high schoolers to apply outside the United States for their bachelor's degree. As many California universities hope to attract foreign students, who pay higher tuition, it's worth asking whether the state's students might find some advantages in looking abroad for a university. With rising tuition and dropping acceptance rates at many colleges and universities in the state, it's high time to think outside the quad.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Jason Song
Jewel Wade remembers the tense atmosphere at Compton Community College in 2006, when it was rumored the school would close. "The whole school was kind of depressing because nobody knew what was going on," Wade recalled Tuesday. State officials did strip the school of its accreditation and turned the campus into a satellite of a nearby two-year college. The $25-million library, which had been set to open in 2007, was found to be plagued with code violations and sat unused for nearly seven years before finally opening late last month after undergoing extensive renovations that cost an additional $4 million.
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OPINION
September 12, 2010 | By Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus
At Pomona College, a top-flight liberal arts school, this year's sticker price for tuition and fees is a hefty $38,394 (not including room and board). Even after adjusting for inflation, that comes to 2.9 times what Pomona was charging a generation ago, in 1980. This kind of massive tuition increase is the norm. In New England, Williams College charges $41,434, or an inflation-adjusted 3.2 times what it did 30 years ago. USC's current tab of $41,022 is a 3.6 multiple of its 1980 bill.
OPINION
April 15, 2014 | By Lanhee J. Chen
The recent defeat of an effort to reinstitute affirmative action in admissions to California's public colleges and universities demonstrates the political power of Asian American voters and challenges the conventional wisdom about their partisan loyalties. The defeat is a reminder that Asian Americans can have a decisive impact on political and policymaking processes. Perhaps more important, it suggests that if education is a key issue that drives Asian American voters, the Democratic Party may not be able to reliably count on their support in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
After a long stretch of rising competition in college admissions, the numbers this year may be on the side of students like Davone Morales, an Eagle Rock High School senior. He and his classmates nationwide are lucky to be part of the smallest group in years applying to college. The population dip won't bust open the doors to Stanford, Harvard, UCLA and other highly selective campuses. But many experts predict it will be somewhat easier to obtain admission offers from many good, even competitive, schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2014 | By Larry Gordon and Jason Song
The recent expulsions of 11 students from an Orange County high school because of a cheating scandal appeared to be a forceful stand against academic dishonesty. But that discipline also has focused attention on the murkier questions about whether, and how, colleges should be informed about applicants' histories of misbehavior. College admissions officials say the expelled students and others in similar situations should come clean quickly to schools they've applied to, and they should be prepared for the consequences, including the possibility of having acceptance letters revoked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Two Long Beach colleges are among 12 nationally that will offer scholarships to low-income students who are in this country illegally and not eligible for federal financial aid, officials announced Tuesday. Long Beach City College and Cal State Long Beach are participating in the new national program called TheDream.US, an initiative launched by several prominent philanthropists. The name refers to the federal Dream Act, which would offer a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 1.7 million young people brought to the country illegally as children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The new industry of large-scale online education will garner an important measure of academic respectability Thursday when the American Council on Education announces that four courses of the Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera organization are worthy of college credit - if anti-cheating measures are enforced. It is now up to colleges and universities to decide whether to allow their students to replace traditional courses taught in classrooms with low-cost online courses that enroll many thousands of students worldwide and involve little direct interaction with instructors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
California community colleges on Tuesday will launch a new tool that provides a snapshot of performance at all 112 campuses, designed to help students pick the right school and push the institutions to improve. The Student Success Scorecard is being touted as one of the most ambitious attempts by any college system to make such key measures as completion rates, retention of students and job-training success accessible to the public and policymakers in an easy-to-use format. Information for each college as well as statewide averages is available via a portal on the community college chancellor's website , and individual campuses will have their own score card and a link to other colleges on their websites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
"So where is Waldo, really?" That's not the kind of question most high school seniors expect to find on their college admission applications. But it is one of the essay options that applicants to the University of Chicago face this year in their quest for a coveted freshman berth. It is the kind of mind-stretching, offbeat or downright freaky essay question that is becoming more common these days as colleges and universities seek to pierce the fog of students' traditional self-aggrandizing essays detailing their accomplishments and hardships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | Chris Megerian and Paige St. John and Scott Gold
When they climbed on board the bus, most were strangers. Not friends, nor classmates. They were called together by aspiration: They were headed to Humboldt State University through a program designed for underprivileged students. Most would be the first in their family to go to college. They were called together, too, by fate: They were assigned to this bus because their last names began with the letters A through L. A little after 5:30 on Thursday evening, now 500 miles into the trip, their bus carrying 48 people thundered past the fertile farms that line Interstate 5. A FedEx tractor-trailer veered across a wide median and struck the bus head-on.
OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "In free agency we trust," Opinion, April 8 I'm desperately trying to hold on to the quaint notion that college athletes should be students first and foremost. Therefore, I applaud Mark Brilliant's idea of setting up a trust fund that spreads the wealth and yet is also tied in with academic progress. But he leaves out one group that profits most handsomely from the current system and never seems to have to pay for any of it: the owners of professional basketball and football franchises.
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Mark Brilliant
The NCAA must be feeling a bit like Dr. Frankenstein these days: assailed by college football and men's basketball players who reject the NCAA's precious, but mostly mythic, notion that they are student-athletes. At Northwestern University, a group of football players scored a first-round victory before the National Labor Relations Board in a campaign to be recognized as "employees" eligible to unionize. For some college football fans, this evokes disturbing images of burly 18- to 22-year-old player-proletarians marching on picket lines instead of lined up on offensive or defensive lines, much less seated in classrooms.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
ARLINGTON, Texas - The Final Four has grown so large they had to move it from Planet Earth to Jerry World. It actually makes sense a stadium nicknamed "The Billion Dollar Play Pen" should host college basketball's billion-dollar end games. It makes less sense that everyone except the players seems to be cashing in. This being Texas, of course, one host city was not enough to handle the event, as the NCAA granted this bid to the wide-open-spaces sweep of "North Texas. " That means Amarillo, technically, got a Final Four in the modern era before Los Angeles.
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Warning: This editorial may upset you," Editorial, March 31 The Times claims, "The latest attack on academic freedom comes not from government authorities or corporate pressure but from students. " That is completely ridiculous. The Times needs to show some real sensitivity to those who suffer every day from post-traumatic stress disorder. You can't even begin to fathom what it's like to live through a traumatic experience that causes these issues. Every member of the editorial board should make it a point to talk to people who have PTSD and gain some critical perspective.
SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Chris Foster
A former sports agent says he provided payments to a basketball star while the player competed in high school and for UCLA. Noah Lookofsky said Tyler Honeycutt and Honeycutt's mother, Lisa Stazel, were given money to cover rent, travel and the down payment on a car as the agent tried to coax them toward a representation agreement. Lookofsky said during a phone interview Wednesday afternoon that he had documentation proving he invested more than $55,000 in Honeycutt, but that "the true number is actually north of $100,000.
OPINION
February 1, 2012
Society trusts teachers and school administrators to deliver a lesson arguably more important than reading and math: Cheating is not only forbidden but dishonorable. How discouraging and frustrating it is, then, to discover yet another instance in which an institution itself has been caught violating the rules. On Monday, Claremont McKenna College announced that an official there inflated the SAT scores of incoming students to make the school look good in national rankings, including the overhyped lists published annually in U.S. News & World Report.
OPINION
March 28, 2014
Re "Reining in for-profit colleges," Editorial, March 23 Profit-driven education leads only to greed and corruption. I taught at a for-profit college and was shocked at the quality of students who passed the school's "entrance exam" yet sat clueless in my classroom. These schools prey on poor, desperate individuals looking to better themselves, only to be fooled into enrolling in programs that have no real value. These schools are primarily interested in one thing: money. With recruiters drawing good salaries, you bet their sales pitches are aggressive.
OPINION
March 28, 2014
Re "Reining in for-profit colleges," Editorial, March 23 Profit-driven education leads only to greed and corruption. I taught at a for-profit college and was shocked at the quality of students who passed the school's "entrance exam" yet sat clueless in my classroom. These schools prey on poor, desperate individuals looking to better themselves, only to be fooled into enrolling in programs that have no real value. These schools are primarily interested in one thing: money. With recruiters drawing good salaries, you bet their sales pitches are aggressive.
OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
University officials and the NCAA have been reluctant to acknowledge that top-tier college football programs are run these days less as athletic programs than as businesses. But a labor administrator's decision Wednesday that Northwestern University's scholarship football players are, in fact, employees with the right to unionize should get their attention. This issue has been bubbling for decades as major sports programs evolved from important but ancillary parts of a college's mission into powerful businesses enriched by multimillion-dollar TV contracts and merchandising revenue, all built on the labor of student-athletes who received no compensation beyond scholarships.
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