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OPINION
August 20, 2013 | By Aaron Rosen
For many college students, the semester abroad has become a rite of passage. But while many Americans study abroad for a semester or two, it is a rarity for high schoolers to apply outside the United States for their bachelor's degree. As many California universities hope to attract foreign students, who pay higher tuition, it's worth asking whether the state's students might find some advantages in looking abroad for a university. With rising tuition and dropping acceptance rates at many colleges and universities in the state, it's high time to think outside the quad.
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OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Mark Brilliant
The NCAA must be feeling a bit like Dr. Frankenstein these days: assailed by college football and men's basketball players who reject the NCAA's precious, but mostly mythic, notion that they are student-athletes. At Northwestern University, a group of football players scored a first-round victory before the National Labor Relations Board in a campaign to be recognized as "employees" eligible to unionize. For some college football fans, this evokes disturbing images of burly 18- to 22-year-old player-proletarians marching on picket lines instead of lined up on offensive or defensive lines, much less seated in classrooms.
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OPINION
September 12, 2010 | By Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus
At Pomona College, a top-flight liberal arts school, this year's sticker price for tuition and fees is a hefty $38,394 (not including room and board). Even after adjusting for inflation, that comes to 2.9 times what Pomona was charging a generation ago, in 1980. This kind of massive tuition increase is the norm. In New England, Williams College charges $41,434, or an inflation-adjusted 3.2 times what it did 30 years ago. USC's current tab of $41,022 is a 3.6 multiple of its 1980 bill.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
ARLINGTON, Texas - The Final Four has grown so large they had to move it from Planet Earth to Jerry World. It actually makes sense a stadium nicknamed "The Billion Dollar Play Pen" should host college basketball's billion-dollar end games. It makes less sense that everyone except the players seems to be cashing in. This being Texas, of course, one host city was not enough to handle the event, as the NCAA granted this bid to the wide-open-spaces sweep of "North Texas. " That means Amarillo, technically, got a Final Four in the modern era before Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Two Long Beach colleges are among 12 nationally that will offer scholarships to low-income students who are in this country illegally and not eligible for federal financial aid, officials announced Tuesday. Long Beach City College and Cal State Long Beach are participating in the new national program called TheDream.US, an initiative launched by several prominent philanthropists. The name refers to the federal Dream Act, which would offer a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 1.7 million young people brought to the country illegally as children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
After a long stretch of rising competition in college admissions, the numbers this year may be on the side of students like Davone Morales, an Eagle Rock High School senior. He and his classmates nationwide are lucky to be part of the smallest group in years applying to college. The population dip won't bust open the doors to Stanford, Harvard, UCLA and other highly selective campuses. But many experts predict it will be somewhat easier to obtain admission offers from many good, even competitive, schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The new industry of large-scale online education will garner an important measure of academic respectability Thursday when the American Council on Education announces that four courses of the Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera organization are worthy of college credit - if anti-cheating measures are enforced. It is now up to colleges and universities to decide whether to allow their students to replace traditional courses taught in classrooms with low-cost online courses that enroll many thousands of students worldwide and involve little direct interaction with instructors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
California community colleges on Tuesday will launch a new tool that provides a snapshot of performance at all 112 campuses, designed to help students pick the right school and push the institutions to improve. The Student Success Scorecard is being touted as one of the most ambitious attempts by any college system to make such key measures as completion rates, retention of students and job-training success accessible to the public and policymakers in an easy-to-use format. Information for each college as well as statewide averages is available via a portal on the community college chancellor's website , and individual campuses will have their own score card and a link to other colleges on their websites.
OPINION
February 1, 2012
Society trusts teachers and school administrators to deliver a lesson arguably more important than reading and math: Cheating is not only forbidden but dishonorable. How discouraging and frustrating it is, then, to discover yet another instance in which an institution itself has been caught violating the rules. On Monday, Claremont McKenna College announced that an official there inflated the SAT scores of incoming students to make the school look good in national rankings, including the overhyped lists published annually in U.S. News & World Report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2014 | By Larry Gordon and Jason Song
The recent expulsions of 11 students from an Orange County high school because of a cheating scandal appeared to be a forceful stand against academic dishonesty. But that discipline also has focused attention on the murkier questions about whether, and how, colleges should be informed about applicants' histories of misbehavior. College admissions officials say the expelled students and others in similar situations should come clean quickly to schools they've applied to, and they should be prepared for the consequences, including the possibility of having acceptance letters revoked.
OPINION
April 4, 2014
Re "Warning: This editorial may upset you," Editorial, March 31 The Times claims, "The latest attack on academic freedom comes not from government authorities or corporate pressure but from students. " That is completely ridiculous. The Times needs to show some real sensitivity to those who suffer every day from post-traumatic stress disorder. You can't even begin to fathom what it's like to live through a traumatic experience that causes these issues. Every member of the editorial board should make it a point to talk to people who have PTSD and gain some critical perspective.
SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Chris Foster
A former sports agent says he provided payments to a basketball star while the player competed in high school and for UCLA. Noah Lookofsky said Tyler Honeycutt and Honeycutt's mother, Lisa Stazel, were given money to cover rent, travel and the down payment on a car as the agent tried to coax them toward a representation agreement. Lookofsky said during a phone interview Wednesday afternoon that he had documentation proving he invested more than $55,000 in Honeycutt, but that "the true number is actually north of $100,000.
OPINION
March 28, 2014
Re "Reining in for-profit colleges," Editorial, March 23 Profit-driven education leads only to greed and corruption. I taught at a for-profit college and was shocked at the quality of students who passed the school's "entrance exam" yet sat clueless in my classroom. These schools prey on poor, desperate individuals looking to better themselves, only to be fooled into enrolling in programs that have no real value. These schools are primarily interested in one thing: money. With recruiters drawing good salaries, you bet their sales pitches are aggressive.
OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
University officials and the NCAA have been reluctant to acknowledge that top-tier college football programs are run these days less as athletic programs than as businesses. But a labor administrator's decision Wednesday that Northwestern University's scholarship football players are, in fact, employees with the right to unionize should get their attention. This issue has been bubbling for decades as major sports programs evolved from important but ancillary parts of a college's mission into powerful businesses enriched by multimillion-dollar TV contracts and merchandising revenue, all built on the labor of student-athletes who received no compensation beyond scholarships.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Northwestern University football players have the right to form a union, a regional director of the National Labor Relations Board ruled Wednesday, setting the stage for potential dramatic change to the college sports landscape. Peter Sung Ohr, in Chicago, ruled that "players receiving scholarships from the employer are 'employees'" and ordered that an election be conducted to determine whether Northwestern players wanted representation by the College Athletes Players Assn. for the purposes of collective bargaining.
OPINION
March 23, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
For-profit colleges that wildly exaggerate their graduates' success and talk prospective attendees into taking on extraordinary debt are not only harming their students but costing taxpayers billions of dollars on wasted Pell grants and defaulted federal student loans. After an earlier court defeat, the Obama administration is trying again to set rules to stop schools from overpromising to attract students. This time, the rules should stick. The administration has spent years looking for ways to crack down on the bad actors within the for-profit college industry, which accounts for just 13% of college enrollment but almost half of all federal student loan defaults.
OPINION
March 28, 2014
Re "Reining in for-profit colleges," Editorial, March 23 Profit-driven education leads only to greed and corruption. I taught at a for-profit college and was shocked at the quality of students who passed the school's "entrance exam" yet sat clueless in my classroom. These schools prey on poor, desperate individuals looking to better themselves, only to be fooled into enrolling in programs that have no real value. These schools are primarily interested in one thing: money. With recruiters drawing good salaries, you bet their sales pitches are aggressive.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2013 | By Shan Li
It's no surprise that a college major could determine whether you're rolling in cash or cobbling together multiple part-time jobs after graduation. But which degrees really rake in the dough? And which doom you to eating ramen noodles for years? A new survey found -- surprise! -- that science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors earn the highest starting salaries, handily beating their classmates studying liberal arts. In some cases, so-called stem majors are approaching or even outpacing those with business degrees.
OPINION
March 22, 2014
The Times published a retraction on March 15 acknowledging that a front-page story on Dec. 7 falsely accused Occidental College of covering up 27 cases of sexual assault in 2012. We appreciate the paper setting the record straight. But the falsehood - spread via the Associated Press and amplified through social media - has caused lasting harm to Occidental's reputation that cannot be undone with an "editor's note" on Page A4. Compounding matters, The Times has failed to report the substantial steps Occidental has taken to deal with sexual misconduct.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
SPOKANE, Wash. - Taylor Braun tried to pull everyone's leg after North Dakota State pulled off Thursday's West regional semi-stunner against Oklahoma. "Honestly," the Bison's star deadpanned at the postgame news conference at Spokane Arena, "I don't know what all the hype is about, the NCAA tournament. " With perfect comedic pause, he added, "I'm kidding. " 2014 NCAA tournament bracket What happened during the first two days of the NCAA tournament was no joke to higher seeded teams that got sent home with upset stomachs.
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