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BUSINESS
February 16, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, John O'Dell covers major Orange County corporations and manufacturing for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5831 and at john.odell@latimes.com
Oops! We mentioned several weeks ago that the UCI Graduate School of Business had been ranked 28th among the top 50 business schools by Britain's Financial Times, and we listed the other California business schools in the ranking. Except Stanford University, which ranked third in the U.S. and first in California.
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NEWS
February 13, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Saying that California's public colleges and universities will soon "run out of room," the legislative analyst's office recommends that all campuses move to year-round operations to squeeze in more students. The recommendation is remarkable given that the legislative analyst has been the most vocal critic of projections that California's colleges will be swamped by a tidal wave of half a million extra students by 2005.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As 1998 winds down, the University of California is ramping up a new program to encourage collaboration between academic researchers and the state's burgeoning multimedia industry. The Digital Media Innovation Program, affectionately known as DiMI, will facilitate research on topics ranging from fingerprint identification to agricultural systems that track pesticides, fertilizer and water with satellite images.
NEWS
October 15, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
College enrollment in California is rising faster than predicted and the state's next governor will have to help colleges find room for an extra 538,000 students in coming years, according to two reports released Wednesday. The reports came, in part, as a rebuttal to a state legislative analyst's report this year dismissing the notion that a "tidal wave" of students will swamp the state's colleges and universities by 2005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS
On many campuses, biology is often the most popular major, drawing brainy teenagers who figure that they're destined to become doctors. But many of those premed majors veer off into other fields, as students are seduced from the hard sciences by, say, the pleasures of reading great books or exploring the arts or social sciences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1998 | LIZ SEYMOUR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Future engineers, anthropologists and other graduate students at UC Irvine are locked in a labor stalemate with the very university where they are receiving their education. Though their studies may be esoteric, the graduate students' dispute centers on the most mundane roots of labor strife: pay, workload and benefits. Perhaps that is why in forming a union, they have aligned themselves with the mighty United Auto Workers. The students held their first organizing meeting a year ago.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of Democrats in the Legislature on Tuesday called for spending the state's $4.4-billion surplus to repeal student fees at California universities and colleges rather than give motorists a tax break. The proposal to eliminate tuition--a 1960s legacy of former Gov. Ronald Reagan--"amounts to a tax cut for middle-class families," said state Sen. John Vasconcellos, a liberal Democrat from Santa Clara.
NEWS
May 10, 1998 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With this year's budget surplus expected to be about $4 billion, Gov. Pete Wilson's administration Saturday called for the first of what will be several spending proposals--$170 million for new computers, books and long-needed maintenance at public universities. That money is in addition to the nearly $6 billion that Wilson offered to spend on the University of California and California State University systems in January when he issued his proposed budget of $73.8 billion.
NEWS
April 18, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latino leaders Friday brought to the nation's capital their concerns about decreased minority university admissions in California, warning that the poverty and dropout problems among Latino youths will only worsen unless the trend is reversed. Officials of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and other organizations who sponsored a Capitol Hill press briefing said they were determined to overcome anti-affirmative action policies in California.
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