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NEWS
February 4, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
An alleged Colombian drug dealer imprisoned on trafficking charges whose wife was shot dead in a mob-style slaying has pleaded with the United States to take in his children because he fears for their lives, newspapers reported. Jesus Amado Sarria reportedly offered to assist U.S. drug investigations if his request was accepted.
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NEWS
January 31, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Samper on Tuesday opened a special session of the Colombian Congress convened to decide whether there is enough evidence to try him on charges that he knew his 1994 campaign was financed with drug money. "I come here to ask Congress for justice," Samper said during a speech inaugurating the session. "I ask that Congress judge me quickly and with the guarantees of the constitution and the law--nothing more but also nothing less." Sen.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING and STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Ernesto Samper's government teetered on the brink of collapse Friday as students marched through the streets of the capital, three Cabinet ministers resigned and business leaders signed an open letter, all demanding that he step aside because of mounting evidence that drug money financed his 1994 political campaign. The Colombian peso, which had stabilized late last year, has lost nearly 4% of its value since Jan.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Opponents are crying "Cover-up!" and Colombians fear new violence as a congressional committee dominated by President Ernesto Samper's political cronies prepares to clear him of charges that he financed his 1994 electoral campaign with drug money. Chief congressional investigator Heyne Mogollon has recommended that the Congressional Committee of Accusations shelve a four-month inquiry into Samper's activities for lack of proof of wrongdoing, Colombian newspapers reported Thursday.
NEWS
September 27, 1995 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Struggling to save his floundering administration from a growing drug scandal, President Ernesto Samper on Tuesday became the first Colombian president formally called to account by the country's Congress on accusations of corruption. Samper testified before the House of Representatives' chief investigator about allegations that his 1994 presidential campaign received $6 million in financing from the Cali drug cartel, at that time the world's largest exporter of cocaine.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | Reuters
President Ernesto Samper has startled the military and won praise from human rights groups by personally admitting the state's guilt in one of the most brutal episodes in Colombian history--the mutilation and slaughter of 107 peasants. In an emotional ceremony Tuesday at the presidential palace to which families of the victims were invited, Samper accepted the state's responsibility for the massacres in the southwestern town of Trujillo between 1988 and 1990.
NEWS
November 25, 1992 | Reuters
The influential former guerrilla movement M-19 quit the government Tuesday to protest President Cesar Gaviria's military crackdown on armed rebels and pleaded for U.N. mediation to stop the bloodshed. The M-19's withdrawal means the resignation of Health Minister Gustavo de Roux and 350 lesser officials. It is Gaviria's first major loss of political support since he declared the crackdown Nov. 8 to fight the country's estimated 8,000 Marxist rebels.
NEWS
November 14, 1992 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By declaring a state of emergency and announcing strong measures against the country's leftist guerrillas this week, President Cesar Gaviria finally moved to answer those who accuse him of waffling and weakness in the face of Colombia's crisis of violence.
NEWS
August 29, 1992 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than a month after cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar escaped from a luxurious jail where he spent a year rebuilding his drug trafficking organization, Colombian officials still are playing a bitter blame game over the fiasco. Senior officials close to President Cesar Gaviria claim that their subordinates failed to inform them that Escobar was taking over his prison outside Medellin.
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