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NEWS
June 17, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING and STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although President Ernesto Samper said his government is willing "to open a new door to peace" following Sunday's release of 70 soldiers and marines held by guerrillas, officials moved quickly to lower expectations that any negotiated settlement with insurgents is near. "It would be pure euphoria to think that" Latin America's longest civil war is close to ending, said Foreign Minister Maria Emma Mejia.
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NEWS
March 14, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Ernesto Samper clashed with the nation's highest court, accusing it of political meddling after it overturned his emergency economic plan on grounds that it was unconstitutional. The clash between the executive and judicial branches came after the court, in a 6-3 vote Wednesday, struck down all 16 decrees issued under the state of economic emergency that Samper declared on Jan. 13 to help fight a growing fiscal deficit.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | Associated Press
Just two days after angrily suspending drug-crop eradication over differences with Washington, the Colombian government announced Friday that it was resuming the program, but with greater autonomy. Justice Minister Carlos Medellin declared that spraying would begin again Wednesday and that Colombia would try to pay for the eradication on its own, using assets seized from drug traffickers. The current program is largely underwritten by--and closely coordinated with--the United States.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the way Americans have watched the O. J. Simpson trials unfold on television, Colombians have tuned in to keep up with a narco-political scandal that has jailed 14 members of Congress and raised questions about President Ernesto Samper's possible links to drug lords. But Congress this week gave the government a powerful weapon to end the televised saga. Legislators voted to let the government take away the air time of the current owners of newscasts at the end of next year.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after the Colombian Congress earlier this month cleared President Ernesto Samper of ties to drug traffickers, he vowed to spearhead a movement for national reconciliation. Yet many Colombians fear that "reconciliation" is a code word for whitewash and even repression by an administration determined to stay in power despite evidence that the president's 1994 campaign was financed by millions of dollars in drug money.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
An alleged Colombian drug dealer imprisoned on trafficking charges whose wife was shot dead in a mob-style slaying has pleaded with the United States to take in his children because he fears for their lives, newspapers reported. Jesus Amado Sarria reportedly offered to assist U.S. drug investigations if his request was accepted.
NEWS
January 31, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Samper on Tuesday opened a special session of the Colombian Congress convened to decide whether there is enough evidence to try him on charges that he knew his 1994 campaign was financed with drug money. "I come here to ask Congress for justice," Samper said during a speech inaugurating the session. "I ask that Congress judge me quickly and with the guarantees of the constitution and the law--nothing more but also nothing less." Sen.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING and STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Ernesto Samper's government teetered on the brink of collapse Friday as students marched through the streets of the capital, three Cabinet ministers resigned and business leaders signed an open letter, all demanding that he step aside because of mounting evidence that drug money financed his 1994 political campaign. The Colombian peso, which had stabilized late last year, has lost nearly 4% of its value since Jan.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Opponents are crying "Cover-up!" and Colombians fear new violence as a congressional committee dominated by President Ernesto Samper's political cronies prepares to clear him of charges that he financed his 1994 electoral campaign with drug money. Chief congressional investigator Heyne Mogollon has recommended that the Congressional Committee of Accusations shelve a four-month inquiry into Samper's activities for lack of proof of wrongdoing, Colombian newspapers reported Thursday.
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