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WORLD
November 3, 2002 | From Reuters
The Colombian government blocked the release from prison of two former bosses of the Cali cocaine cartel a day after a judge infuriated President Alvaro Uribe by ruling that the two powerful drug lords could go free with less than half their sentences served. "The government has ordered that the prisoners not be released while many doubts exist," Uribe said Saturday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - With the public's patience wearing thin, pressure is mounting on the Colombian government and the FARC rebel group to make substantive progress in peace talks that have bogged down over how to fashion a political role for the insurgents. On Saturday, the two sides will complete their 12th bargaining session in Havana since the negotiations began in October. Only the first of six bargaining issues on the agenda - an agrarian reform initiative - has been settled, and observers see little chance of a breakthrough on the second: the mechanics of the rebels making the transition from warfare to post-conflict democracy.
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NEWS
December 15, 1996 | PAUL HAVEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jose Rivera hates the smell of burning tar, but he likes change in his pocket--and motorists tip generously for someone willing to fill any of the 4 million potholes on Bogota's crumbling streets. In a country notorious for shoddy or absent basic services, many Colombians earn a living doing the work not done by an inefficient government. They provide makeshift phone services, clean the streets of recyclable garbage and even direct traffic for tips.
WORLD
May 26, 2013 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - In a milestone first step in efforts to end Latin America's longest-running insurgency, Colombia's largest rebel group and the government said Sunday that they had reached an agreement on land reform, the first of six points that could make up an eventual peace deal. The agreement on agrarian reform, considered a crucial element of any broader accord, is a boost for President Juan Manuel Santos, who last summer took the risky political move of restarting peace talks with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.
NEWS
January 27, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING and STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Ernesto Samper's government teetered on the brink of collapse Friday as students marched through the streets of the capital, three Cabinet ministers resigned and business leaders signed an open letter, all demanding that he step aside because of mounting evidence that drug money financed his 1994 political campaign. The Colombian peso, which had stabilized late last year, has lost nearly 4% of its value since Jan.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - With the public's patience wearing thin, pressure is mounting on the Colombian government and the FARC rebel group to make substantive progress in peace talks that have bogged down over how to fashion a political role for the insurgents. On Saturday, the two sides will complete their 12th bargaining session in Havana since the negotiations began in October. Only the first of six bargaining issues on the agenda - an agrarian reform initiative - has been settled, and observers see little chance of a breakthrough on the second: the mechanics of the rebels making the transition from warfare to post-conflict democracy.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Colombian government said Saturday that it had fired Mark Penn's public relations firm after Penn, the chief campaign strategist for presidential contender Hillary Rodham Clinton, apologized for meeting with Colombian officials pushing a trade deal with the U.S.
WORLD
February 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Colombian President Alvaro Uribe ruled out exchanging prisoners with his country's largest rebel group, which holds dozens of hostages. Those held by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, are "good citizens" who cannot be exchanged for jailed guerrillas, Uribe said during a visit to the European Union office in Brussels. "The Colombian government cannot enter into negotiations that strengthen terrorism," Uribe said at a news conference. The hostages include three U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 1986
Nicaragua's Sandinista government rejected Colombian charges that it supplied weapons used by leftist Colombian guerrillas in a November assault on the Palace of Justice in Bogota that killed more than 100 people. Nicaraguan Foreign Minister Miguel D'Escoto denied the charge in a letter to Augusto Ramirez Ocampo, Colombia's foreign minister.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
MEDELLIN, Colombia - The actor's comb-over, the mincing walk, the flat speech cadence and murderous, reptilian glare are all too reminiscent of one of the most powerful criminals who lived. The large number of Colombian eyeballs glued to a new prime-time telenovela about the life and times of Pablo Escobar, highlighted by actor Andrés Parra's bravura performance, shows that the late drug narco still fascinates more than 18 years after he died on a Medellin rooftop in a shoot-out with police.
WORLD
November 19, 2012 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia -- In what some analysts saw as an encouraging sign, Colombia's largest rebel group declared a two-month truce to take effect Monday night as peace talks resumed in hopes of ending the country's five-decade civil conflict. Ivan Marquez, a top commander and negotiator for the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known by its Spanish initials FARC, said the truce was a goodwill gesture over the Christmas holidays. He spoke in Havana, where talks resumed this week after opening in Oslo last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
MEDELLIN, Colombia - The actor's comb-over, the mincing walk, the flat speech cadence and murderous, reptilian glare are all too reminiscent of one of the most powerful criminals who lived. The large number of Colombian eyeballs glued to a new prime-time telenovela about the life and times of Pablo Escobar, highlighted by actor Andrés Parra's bravura performance, shows that the late drug narco still fascinates more than 18 years after he died on a Medellin rooftop in a shoot-out with police.
OPINION
March 12, 2012
Ten years ago, peace negotiations between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia collapsed after the rebel group hijacked a plane and kidnapped a high-profile senator. Since then more than 20,000 rebels and paramilitary fighters have been killed in combat with military forces, according to the Washington Office on Latin America. Now, the FARC says it is ready to negotiate and has renounced its long-standing practice of kidnapping for profit. Its promise to end abductions and to release 10 soldiers and police officers held captive for more than a decade in jungle camps are significant and welcome developments - and something the FARC never agreed to in past peace talks.
WORLD
September 16, 2011 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Ask Arleth Mendoza whether she feels safer now that the Colombian government has demobilized right-wing militias and all but declared victory in its decades-long war with leftist rebels. Her husband, Antonio, a city councilman here who stood up for landless peasants, was gunned down in July, leaving their three children, all younger than 9, fatherless. "There was no warning, no threats. They killed him in cold blood," said the widow, who appeared still to be in shock six weeks later.
OPINION
September 2, 2011
The United States has long considered Colombia its strongest ally in Latin America. Over the last eight years it has provided the Colombian government with nearly $6 billion as part of Plan Colombia, an ambitious anti-narcotics and counterinsurgency program that has often been held up as a model of cooperation. But recent reports in the Washington Post suggest that U.S. assistance intended to combat drugs and terrorism was diverted to Colombian intelligence officials, who used it instead to spy on judges, journalists, politicians and union leaders.
OPINION
October 2, 2010
For many years now, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia ? guerrillas who have waged civil war against the government since the 1960s ? have been falling behind the times. Living as they do in Colombia's vast forests, the FARC troops, made up mostly of poor peasants who are given guns, a bit of food and a smattering of pseudo-communist ideology, are often the last to get important updates about world events. For example, several American military contractors who were held hostage by the FARC until their rescue in 2008 recounted their futile efforts to convince their captors that the Panama Canal was no longer in the possession of the United States, or that the real reason for the U.S. embargo of Cuba was not to keep Americans from fleeing there.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their single biggest victory in the drug war, Colombian police Friday shot and killed notorious narcotics trafficker Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, who as a leader of the Medellin cartel waged a campaign of terror to maintain the world's biggest cocaine empire.
OPINION
August 9, 2010 | By Carolina Barco
In his Aug. 5 Times Op-Ed article, " U.S. needs to reevaluate Plan Colombia ," Milburn Line raises some important issues about the U.S.-Colombia alliance. Unfortunately, in questioning the progress Colombia has made under former President Alvaro Uribe in fighting insurgencies and curtailing the drug trade, Line presents an uninformed point of view. That Colombia has undergone an impressive transformation over the past decade is inarguable. The dramatic reduction in violence — with homicides having dropped by 45% between 2002 and 2009 — has yielded crime rates throughout our nation that are lower than those in many U.S. cities.
WORLD
July 25, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Tensions are bubbling once more along the rugged 1,200-mile border between Venezuela and Colombia. Using videos and photos, Colombian diplomats accused Venezuela of tolerating the presence of 1,500 leftist rebel fighters and several top leaders in its territory. They made the charges in a presentation Thursday before the Organization of American States. They requested an international body to monitor the border and verify the presence of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia , or FARC.
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