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Colony Capital Inc

BUSINESS
March 29, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tortuous chase for control of Santa Anita Cos. took another wide turn Friday when the only bidding group with a publicly announced offer said it has pulled out of the contest. The group--consisting of real estate specialists Koll Co. of Newport Beach, Colony Capital Inc. of Los Angeles and Apollo Real Estate Advisors in New York--made good on an ultimatum in which it threatened to withdraw unless it struck a deal with Santa Anita by the close of business Friday.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 2003 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. decided Friday that there was no magic genie to uncork at the Aladdin Resort and Casino, abandoning its efforts to buy the troubled gambling palace on the Las Vegas Strip. The company wants to focus its capital spending on existing properties and a new $325-million casino in Lake Charles, La., rather than take a plunge into the 2,500-room Aladdin, said Chief Executive Daniel Lee. Pinnacle had worked with Colony Capital Inc. and Marriott International Inc.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2001 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. is a casino operator headquartered on Brand Boulevard in Glendale, but its future is riding on 315 acres along the Ohio River in the southern tip of Indiana. That's the site of Pinnacle's new flagship property called Belterra Casino Resort, a $200-million hotel-casino.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1993 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Resolution Trust Corp.'s prospects of recouping losses from Charles Keating Jr.'s biggest real estate venture faded Tuesday when the agency revealed that the 20,000-acre project has been valued at less than 10 cents on the dollar. The valuation comes during a critical phase of the RTC's plan to dispose of the assets of failed savings and loans.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Santa Anita isn't the only Southern California horse-racing track in turmoil. Just look 30 miles west to Hollywood Park. Already beset by weak earnings, a failed subsidiary, stagnant growth in wagering, a dormant stock price and now revelations this week of dissent within its own boardroom, Hollywood Park is struggling. To counter these problems, the Inglewood-based company is assembling gaming properties that will help offset the flat growth in horse racing.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High-flying investor Colony Capital Inc. has teamed up with two Los Angeles real estate firms with Asian aspirations--Oakwood International and Kennedy-Wilson Inc.--as part of its global push to invest more than $1 billion in the coming year. Colony announced Monday that it has formed a joint venture with Oakwood to take its extended-stay corporate housing concept to Asia and has invested $26.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1998 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American investors are jockeying to scoop up prestigious resorts in Hawaii at bargain-basement prices as banks pressure their debt-ridden Japanese owners to sell them. "The bank reforms that went into effect in Japan in April have really forced the issue," said Joseph Toy, director of real estate and hospitality consulting for Coopers & Lybrand in Honolulu. "There's long been talk about the [Japanese] Ministry of Finance being more adamant about divestiture of these troubled loans.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1994 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Is The Donald back? Picture this: Donald Trump, surrounded by well-wishers, plunges a knife into a large gray-frosted cake shaped like a hunk of Manhattan's elevated West Side Highway. The party last year celebrated city approval of his planned apartment complex near the relocated road. Fast-forward four months, to Gulfport, Miss., where Trump wants to build a casino.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1996 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After sputtering for several years, Hawaii's economy is finally shifting into gear, thanks to a renewed influx of free-spending Asian tourists and bargain-hunting hotel investors. Slapped on two sides by the recessions on the U.S. mainland and in Japan, tourism-dependent Hawaii has lagged the nation's economic recovery in the last few years. But an upswing in visitor arrivals, a retailing explosion and renewed investor interest are finally giving the local economy some juice.
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