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Colony Collapse Disorder

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
Colony collapse disorder, a phenomenon in which honeybees vanish from their hives and never return, might be a lesser-known issue than climate change, but it's one that's arguably more critical. As honeybees pollinate — and thus, make possible — a reported 40% of our food supply, the startling loss of millions of bee colonies in the U.S. alone has caused a serious change in the ancient relationship between man and bee. Director Taggart Siegel examines this startling crisis in the vital documentary "Queen of the Sun: What Are the Bees Telling Us?"
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SCIENCE
January 21, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A rapidly mutating virus has leaped from plants to honeybees, where it is reproducing and contributing to the collapse of colonies vital to the multibillion-dollar agricultural industry, according to a new study. Tobacco ringspot virus, a pollen-borne pathogen that causes blight in soy crops, was found during routine screening of commercial honeybees at a U.S. Department of Agriculture laboratory, where further study revealed the RNA virus was replicating inside its Apis mellifera hosts and spreading to mites that travel from bee to bee, according to the study published online Tuesday in the journal mBio.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
In Jerry Seinfeld's "Bee Movie" of four years ago, a talking bee decides to sue the human race after finding out people exploit the insects and sell their honey. But, in fact, the bees were facing a much more dire situation. That year, news began to surface about honeybees fleeing their hives and dying en masse. Known as colony collapse disorder, the phenomenon is global, affecting farmers not only in the U.S. but also around the world, from Argentina and France to New Zealand and Taiwan.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
A new federal report has found that the nation's honeybee decline, which threatens up to $30 billion worth of agriculture production, is being caused by several factors, including disease, parasites and poor genetics. After colony collapse disorder began spreading in 2006, federal officials convened a group of researchers to study the phenomenon. Thursday's report by the Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency found several causes for the honeybee decline.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Colony collapse disorder, a killer of billions of honeybees, isn't likely to affect the country's crops this year, the American Beekeeping Federation said, pointing to a forecast for a record almond harvest in California. Production of almonds, the ninth-largest U.S. crop by value and the crop that uses the most honeybees for pollination, may reach 1.46 billion pounds this year, according to a survey of growers released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That would be the most ever and 5.8% more than last year, when the harvest was valued at $2.4 billion.
SCIENCE
May 23, 2009 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal officials say the decline of honeybee colonies may have slowed slightly but warn that mysterious ailments are still affecting the insects. U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers found that honeybee colonies declined by 29% between September 2008 and early April. That's an improvement over the last two years, when researchers found that 32% and 36% of beekeepers surveyed had lost colonies. Domestic honeybee stocks have been waning since 2004, when scientists learned of a puzzling illness they called colony collapse disorder.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
This being Utah, the self-proclaimed Beehive State, Darren Cox is an expert in -- what else -- bees. Civic fathers use the term for the population's strong work ethic, but Cox deals with the stinging, honey-producing real McCoy. Now the fourth-generation bee farmer is trying to use his recognition as this year's national beekeeper of the year to focus attention on a major threat to the industry: colony collapse disorder. Cox, 48, who lives in Logan but has 5,000 hives in Utah, California's Central Valley and Wyoming, received the award from the American Honey Producers Assn.
SCIENCE
May 2, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Although honeybee loss slowed last year, it remains at dangerously high levels, according to a new federal report that concluded there was no single remedy for the colony collapse that has hit America's hard-working crop pollinators. The report, released Thursday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency, attributed the colony decline to a number of factors, including pesticide exposure, parasites and poor nutrition. Since 2006, when colony collapse disorder emerged, an estimated 10 million bee hives, worth about $2 billion, have been lost.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
A new federal report has found that the nation's honeybee decline, which threatens up to $30 billion worth of agriculture production, is being caused by several factors, including disease, parasites and poor genetics. After colony collapse disorder began spreading in 2006, federal officials convened a group of researchers to study the phenomenon. Thursday's report by the Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency found several causes for the honeybee decline.
HOME & GARDEN
May 3, 2007
THANKS for setting the alarm for our allies, honeybees ["Flight of the Honeybees," April 26]. For more than 30 years our half-acre has had no sprays, inspires mostly natives and has had a bevy of [urban] wildlife. A plethora of butterflies, honeybees, insects feast daily. Living in an oasis in the middle of urban life can be a very pleasant experience -- no need to "leave home"! JILL SWIFT Tarzana GROWERS are intent on producing bigger and showier flowers, fruits and vegetables.
SCIENCE
May 2, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Although honeybee loss slowed last year, it remains at dangerously high levels, according to a new federal report that concluded there was no single remedy for the colony collapse that has hit America's hard-working crop pollinators. The report, released Thursday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency, attributed the colony decline to a number of factors, including pesticide exposure, parasites and poor nutrition. Since 2006, when colony collapse disorder emerged, an estimated 10 million bee hives, worth about $2 billion, have been lost.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
This being Utah, the self-proclaimed Beehive State, Darren Cox is an expert in -- what else -- bees. Civic fathers use the term for the population's strong work ethic, but Cox deals with the stinging, honey-producing real McCoy. Now the fourth-generation bee farmer is trying to use his recognition as this year's national beekeeper of the year to focus attention on a major threat to the industry: colony collapse disorder. Cox, 48, who lives in Logan but has 5,000 hives in Utah, California's Central Valley and Wyoming, received the award from the American Honey Producers Assn.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2012 | Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Almond trees are exploding with pink and white blossoms across the vast Central Valley, marking the start of the growing season for California's most valuable farm export. Toiling among the blooms are the migrant workers that will make or break this year's crop: honeybees. The insects carry the pollen and genetic material needed to turn flowers into nuts as they flit from tree to tree. It's a natural process that no machine can replicate. But it can't be left to chance. Bees are too integral to the fortunes of California's nearly $3-billion-a-year almond industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
In Jerry Seinfeld's "Bee Movie" of four years ago, a talking bee decides to sue the human race after finding out people exploit the insects and sell their honey. But, in fact, the bees were facing a much more dire situation. That year, news began to surface about honeybees fleeing their hives and dying en masse. Known as colony collapse disorder, the phenomenon is global, affecting farmers not only in the U.S. but also around the world, from Argentina and France to New Zealand and Taiwan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
Colony collapse disorder, a phenomenon in which honeybees vanish from their hives and never return, might be a lesser-known issue than climate change, but it's one that's arguably more critical. As honeybees pollinate — and thus, make possible — a reported 40% of our food supply, the startling loss of millions of bee colonies in the U.S. alone has caused a serious change in the ancient relationship between man and bee. Director Taggart Siegel examines this startling crisis in the vital documentary "Queen of the Sun: What Are the Bees Telling Us?"
SCIENCE
May 23, 2009 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal officials say the decline of honeybee colonies may have slowed slightly but warn that mysterious ailments are still affecting the insects. U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers found that honeybee colonies declined by 29% between September 2008 and early April. That's an improvement over the last two years, when researchers found that 32% and 36% of beekeepers surveyed had lost colonies. Domestic honeybee stocks have been waning since 2004, when scientists learned of a puzzling illness they called colony collapse disorder.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2012 | Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Almond trees are exploding with pink and white blossoms across the vast Central Valley, marking the start of the growing season for California's most valuable farm export. Toiling among the blooms are the migrant workers that will make or break this year's crop: honeybees. The insects carry the pollen and genetic material needed to turn flowers into nuts as they flit from tree to tree. It's a natural process that no machine can replicate. But it can't be left to chance. Bees are too integral to the fortunes of California's nearly $3-billion-a-year almond industry.
NEWS
February 1, 2009 | Garance Burke, Burke writes for the Associated Press.
Beekeepers battling a mysterious ailment that led to the disappearance of millions of honeybees now fear the sting of imported Australian bees that could out-compete their hives and may be carrying a deadly parasite unseen in the U.S. The Department of Agriculture has allowed shipments of Australian bees to resume despite concerns by some of its scientists. Australia had been sending the insects across the Pacific for four years to replace hives devastated by the perplexing colony collapse disorder.
NEWS
February 1, 2009 | Garance Burke, Burke writes for the Associated Press.
Beekeepers battling a mysterious ailment that led to the disappearance of millions of honeybees now fear the sting of imported Australian bees that could out-compete their hives and may be carrying a deadly parasite unseen in the U.S. The Department of Agriculture has allowed shipments of Australian bees to resume despite concerns by some of its scientists. Australia had been sending the insects across the Pacific for four years to replace hives devastated by the perplexing colony collapse disorder.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Colony collapse disorder, a killer of billions of honeybees, isn't likely to affect the country's crops this year, the American Beekeeping Federation said, pointing to a forecast for a record almond harvest in California. Production of almonds, the ninth-largest U.S. crop by value and the crop that uses the most honeybees for pollination, may reach 1.46 billion pounds this year, according to a survey of growers released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That would be the most ever and 5.8% more than last year, when the harvest was valued at $2.4 billion.
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