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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
He may have traded Southern California warmth for the gun-metal skies and windy damp of his native England, but this is surely David Hockney's moment in the sun. His compatriots are busy hailing him as undoubtedly Britain's greatest living painter now that his friend Lucian Freud has died. Queen Elizabeth II just appointed him to the Order of Merit, an honor restricted to 24 Britons at any one time for their contributions to the arts and sciences. In the pages of the Guardian — the left-wing paper to which Hockney regularly dashes off harrumphing letters to the editor — a fashion writer felt moved to confess that the artist, a "brilliantly intentional nerd," was "my all-time style hero.
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NEWS
November 20, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Like Frida Kahlo's famous La Casa Azul (“The Blue House”) in Mexico City, the sunny green kitchen of John Benson and Molly O'Brien in Silver Lake resonates with bold and unexpected color. Benson's Latin American roots -- his mother was born in Colombia and raised in Chile, and he was born in Ecuador  -- influenced architect Barbara Bestor, who said she also was reminded of Kahlo's home during the remodel. “In a Spanish house you can get away with lots of color,” Bestor said.
HOME & GARDEN
December 19, 2009
When it comes to color, the subject of Kelly Wearstler's third coffee-table book, the Los Angeles-based designer writes: "I do not think there are any rules." That philosophy also applies to her literary efforts. Wearstler gained fame for creating high-voltage interiors filled with color, texture and pattern, but as an author, she plays the die-hard minimalist. "Hue" offers only an introductory Q & A with Wearstler that explores her philosophy of color and cites some of the architects, designers and artists who have inspired her. Photo captions don't exist, and credits and resources are found only in an index at the end of the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Christina Aguilera's hair is going the opposite direction of Miley Cyrus': While Miley was taking the color out and the length short, Xtina is leaving it long and adding color. The color purple, as a matter of fact. Aguilera showed off her new look Sunday at a media event for "The Voice," where she appeared with fellow judges Blake Shelton, Cee Lo Green and Adam Levine, host Carson Daly and producer Mark Burnett. The series premieres Sept. 10. The big news of the event, in addition to the purple?
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The always eye-catching Conservatory & Botanical Gardens at Bellagio in Las Vegas is celebrating summer through Sept. 8 with giant sunflowers, multicolored kites and real birds. The conservatory, an oasis in the desert, is bursting with such blooms as hydrangeas and chrysanthemums. Nearby, a dozen rosy Bourke's parrots (sometimes classified as parakeets) and 50 finches flutter about a greenhouse, while larger-than-life birds made from seeds and other organic materials soar overhead.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
Butterfly wings are so synonymous with bold color that few people may wonder what makes them that way. But Yale University researchers studying the green color on the wings of five butterfly species say they have found the source of that striking color — three-dimensional crystals known as gyroids. Such crystals create vibrant hues through their interactions with light — a type of color that is structural, as opposed to pigment-based. Other animals, such as peacocks and frogs, have structural colors as well, but these particular butterfly colors were based on the especially complex gyroid.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Jay Kvapil's new, variably intriguing ceramic work at Couturier is largely about surface -- viscous, painterly glazes and cratered shells. With only a few exceptions, the vessel forms are understated and conventional. They call little attention to themselves and instead serve as vehicles for potent color and assertive texture. Kvapil titled an earlier series "Pictorial Vessels," making explicit the priority given to surface as bearer of image or mark. Several works here continue in that vein, their glazes like thick, draping garments extending below the cylindrical body of a cup or vase.
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
If you've never seen ranunculus, specifically giant tecolote ranunculus , think of something that looks like a showy rose with a swirled and ruffled heart. These blooms are beyond colorful, and for the last 60 years or so they have been the stars of the Flower Fields in seaside Carlsbad.    For the first time in 15 years, the color motif at the 50-acre Carlsbad Ranch will change this spring. "The Flower Fields decided to change the pattern this year to make it more visually appealing and surprise visitors with a new, more beautiful experience," spokeswoman Cambria McConnell said in an email.
OPINION
May 10, 2003
Re "Hussein Clan May Have a Billion Ways to Foment Unrest," May 7: Since Saddam Hussein may have millions of dollars of American currency in his possession, isn't it about time that America change the color of its money? This would wipe out many enemies of America, including drug cartels and crooked businesses. Paul E. Seal Palm Springs
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2003
Thank you for Lynn Smith's comprehensive article on color in the service of character and theme ("Shading the story," Feb. 16). As one who has researched the effects of color on behavior for more than 20 years and who teaches "Color and Visual Storytelling" at the AFI Conservatory, I can unequivocally tell you that color's influence on the emotions is profound. It influences us to form opinions of characters and identify with emotional undercurrents in a film. In "Philadelphia," as dying Tom Hanks clings to his IV stand, translating the lyrics to an opera whose theme is love and loss, he is slowly enveloped by an intense red light from nowhere.
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