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HOME & GARDEN
July 4, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
"The entire underwater surface of the pool at Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Abbotts' home is covered with Mexican mosaic tile to create a jewel-like setting which intensifies the blueness of the water." Los Angeles Times, April 3, 1960 -- Lory Johansson remembers playing with her cousins during family gatherings at her Uncle Sydney's house in the Baldwin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.
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HOME & GARDEN
August 8, 2012 | By Emily Young
It's hard to know where to look first when you walk into garden designer Jamie Schwentker's tiny bungalow in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles. At the catwalk over the living and dining room? The staircase resembling stacked Japanese tansu ? The chandelier shrouded in faux butterflies and year-round Christmas lights? "I call it Late Wicked Witch," Schwentker says of the 1923 cottage's style, "which is partly a nod to the whole movie thing and partly because it looks like a fairy-tale house.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Judi Dash
Versatility is treasured in travel clothing, and the luscious new 100% silk scarves from Cityzen by Azin are textile jewels. Digitally printed in vibrant hues chosen to represent the dynamic pulse of the places for which they are named (Bangkok, Thailand, London, Los Angeles, Chicago, among them), the expansive scarves can be used as elegant shawls over evening wear; draped, twisted and tied as exotic dresses, skirts or blouses; or wrapped for beach cover-up or bathrobe duty. The scarves come in a 42-by-72-inch rectangle or a 42-inch square.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2007 | By Neil LaBute, Special to The Times
There's a wonderful old theater story about Laurence Olivier in the 1960s — he was playing in "Othello" and receiving generally glowing notices opposite Frank Findlay and a young actress by the name of Maggie Smith. One night, however, as he stormed through the jealous general's odyssey, Olivier seemed to be on fire (not literally, of course, because that would be painful, and, while certainly an interesting if too literal take on the Moor's passionate histrionics, pretty "out there" as an interpretation of Shakespeare, even for the '60s)
BUSINESS
November 20, 2011 | By Troy Wolverton
Televisions, computer monitors and smartphones display only a fraction of the colors the human eye can see. But thanks to a new technology developed by a Silicon Valley nanotechnology company, they may soon get a lot more colorful. Nanosys, which works with materials up to 100,000 times thinner than a human hair, has crafted a thin film laden with minuscule particles that can be placed inside a display to dramatically boost the color range it can show. "Around 30% of what the eye can actually perceive in the real world, your TV can reproduce faithfully," said Jason Hartlove, chief executive of the Palo Alto company.
NEWS
April 7, 2012
Barbara Hartl was on an expedition to Antarctica in February when she came upon the Almirante Brown Antarctic Base, an Argentine research station on the Antarctic Peninsula. "What caught my eye was the bright red building," said Hartl. "So much of Antarctica is without much color, so this scene was in sharp contrast to the usual view. " The Orange resident, who's now been to all seven continents, used a Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSi. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
HOME & GARDEN
November 20, 2010 | By Debra Prinzing, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As a color-packed accent to a 1905 Craftsman bungalow, the front yard of Lisa Little and Phil Brennan's Chartreuse House is an example of how much great design can occur in a tiny patch of soil. Before choosing a zesty palette of drought- and salt-tolerant plantings, designer Stephanie Bartron of SB Garden Design in Los Angeles had to address some of the less visible challenges. Prior owners had piled layers of topsoil over the sandy native soil, creating a drainage mess. "I needed to lower the grade of the front yard in order to move water away from the house," Bartron said.
NATIONAL
March 18, 2009
HOME & GARDEN
April 30, 1994 | KAREN DARDICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Imagine a plant that thrives in heat and sun, is impervious to smog, tolerates water from overhead sprinklers, grows at the phenomenal rate of an inch a day and, best of all, covers itself with masses of eye-catching colorful flowers almost all year. Sounds too good to be true? Meet super petunia. The plant, which has been captivating Europe for the past five years, was introduced to the United States last year. They look like their petunia cousins but behave much better.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
For most of "Les Misérables," things do not go well for Fantine. Abandoned by the father of her child, she goes on a long spiral down the economic ladder and winds up working in a brothel. And although she's always featured with a splash of color in the film, by the time she's selling her body there's only one color left for her to wear: red. "In 'Les Misérables,' one thing [director Tom Hooper] wanted to have was color. Fantine always had to have reds and pinks in her outfit," says costume designer Paco Delgado.
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