Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsColorado River Water
IN THE NEWS

Colorado River Water

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Water demand in the Colorado River Basin will greatly outstrip supply in coming decades as a result of drought, climate change and population growth, according to a broad-ranging federal study. It projects that by 2060, river supplies will fall short of demand by about 3.2 million acre-feet - more than five times the amount of water annually consumed by Los Angeles. "This study should serve as a call to action," U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said Wednesday as he released a report that predicted a drier future for the seven states that depend on the Colorado for irrigation and drinking supplies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The skinny rings of ancient giant sequoias and foxtail pines hold a lesson that Californians are learning once again this winter: It can get very dry, sometimes for a single parched year, sometimes for withering decades. Drought has settled over the state like a dusty blanket, leaving much of the landscape a dreary brown. Receding reservoirs have exposed the ruins of long-forgotten towns. Some cities are rationing supplies and banning outdoor watering. Many growers are expecting no irrigation deliveries from the big government water projects that turned the state's belly into the nation's produce market.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 23, 1985 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Now as a trickle but soon as a torrent, Arizona is finally taking its share of the Colorado River, and the impact will be felt from here to the Pacific beaches. The Central Arizona Project, a $3.5-billion aqueduct, tunnel and pumping system designed to carry water from Lake Havasu on the Colorado south through the desert and over mountains to Phoenix and Tucson, has been operating since early this year. By 1992, 1.6 million acre-feet of water--enough to cover 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2013 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Officials in the seven states that depend on the drought-beset Colorado River expressed a cautious willingness Tuesday to join the federal government in a complex, possibly contentious effort to step up conservation. At a meeting in San Diego, officials of the Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Reclamation announced the establishment of three inter-state committees to devise plans for conservation, possibly including water reuse, desalination, water banking and the sale of water from farms to cities.
OPINION
December 16, 2002
Regarding the controversy on Colorado River water ("Water Deal Talks to Resume," Dec. 12): If both cities and the agriculture industry acted more logically and practically, the water problems would be much less severe. San Diego, Las Vegas and Phoenix all sport luxurious hotels with huge multiple pools, artificial rivers, lagoons and lakes and are surrounded by water- intensive tropical landscaping. If these establishments would design their surroundings with respect for their arid or semiarid regions, many more acre-feet of water would be available for food production, drinking and bathing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
Las Vegas was a blip on the population charts when seven Western states began divvying up the riches of the Colorado River. The Colorado River Compact was crafted in 1922 when agriculture dominated politics and the economy, and this tiny rail stop had 4,859 residents. The compact allocated 15 million acre-feet of water annually to the seven states. California won the lion's share, 4.4 million acre-feet, followed by Colorado with 3.9 million, Arizona 2.8 million, Utah 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Drought-stressed Southern California water managers got some rare uplifting news Friday as the federal government announced that it would permit the Metropolitan Water District to take more than its annual share of water from the Colorado River. At the same time, state officials said copious rain and snowfall from March storms will enable them to increase water deliveries to the MWD and other municipal customers by mid-April.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2007 | Bettina Boxall and Ashley Powers, Times Staff Writers
The federal government Thursday ushered in a new era of shortage on the Colorado River, adopting a blueprint for how it will tighten the spigot on the West's most important water source. The guidelines, more than two years in the making, come in the eighth year of the worst drought in the century-long historic record of the Colorado River, which supplies water to 25 million people and 1 million acres of farmland.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a blow to the historic dominance of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California over regional water matters, a judge Tuesday rejected the mega-agency's concept of what is fair compensation for use of its Colorado River Aqueduct.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting aside years of acrimony and accusations, negotiators for Southern California's warring water agencies reached an agreement early Wednesday designed to ensure that the state will have enough water to meet soaring future needs. "We have reached closure on all core issues," said David Hayes, acting deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior. "We're very excited."
OPINION
February 21, 2013
Re "Is desalt plant a drop in bucket?," Feb. 18 The article about the desalination plant in Carlsbad missed several important elements regarding the San Diego County Water Authority's decision to pursue this water supply. - The plant is a multi-decade investment. Its water initially will be more expensive than other supplies, but projections show it will be cheaper than supplies from the Metropolitan Water District as soon as the mid- to late-2020s. - Energy is a major component of all major water sources and will contribute to the rising cost of every water supply in coming years.
OPINION
December 27, 2012 | By Wade Graham
A study released last week by the Bureau of Reclamation confirms what everyone already knows: We are sucking more water out of the Colorado River Basin than nature is putting in. Like draining a savings account, water users in the seven basin states (Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and California) and Mexico have been drawing down Lake Powell and Lake Mead by about a million more acre-feet of water than rain and snowmelt provide each year. According to the bureau, users' plans for yet more pipelines combined with the effects of global warming, will push the annual deficit as high as 8 million acre-feet by 2060, a cataclysmic shortfall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Water demand in the Colorado River Basin will greatly outstrip supply in coming decades as a result of drought, climate change and population growth, according to a broad-ranging federal study. It projects that by 2060, river supplies will fall short of demand by about 3.2 million acre-feet - more than five times the amount of water annually consumed by Los Angeles. "This study should serve as a call to action," U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said Wednesday as he released a report that predicted a drier future for the seven states that depend on the Colorado for irrigation and drinking supplies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2012 | By Tony Perry and Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - After years of sporadic negotiations, U.S. and Mexican officials Tuesday are set to sign a major agreement aimed at improving binational cooperation over the Colorado River. Under the five-year deal, regional water agencies in Southern California, Arizona and Nevada will purchase a total of nearly 100,000 acre-feet of water from Mexico's share of the Colorado River - enough to cover the needs of 200,000 families for a year. In exchange, Mexico will receive $10 million to repair damage done to its irrigation canals by the magnitude 7.2 earthquake that struck the Mexicali Valley in 2010.
OPINION
March 25, 2012 | By Sandra Postel
River deltas are among the most biologically productive ecosystems on Earth, and for millions of years the delta of the Colorado River was no exception. After a 1,450-mile journey from its headwaters in the Rocky Mountains south into Mexico, the Colorado sustained verdant marshes teeming with life before emptying into the aquatic Eden of the upper Gulf of California. In 1922, the great naturalist Aldo Leopold canoed through the delta, which he described as "a milk and honey wilderness" and a land of "a hundred green lagoons.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Out in the desert, the wind never quits. Over its howling one day recently, Roy Howard strained to make himself heard as he explained why its usual accompaniment, the rush of water and the rumble of enormous industrial pumps, had fallen silent. We were at the Metropolitan Water District's Julian Hinds Pumping Plant, situated at the edge of Joshua Tree National Park and about 20 miles north of the Salton Sea. Hinds is one of five pumping plants on the Colorado River Aqueduct. And it's the last point on the 242-mile journey of Colorado River water from Lake Havasu on the California-Arizona border where pumping is needed.
OPINION
March 25, 2012 | By Sandra Postel
River deltas are among the most biologically productive ecosystems on Earth, and for millions of years the delta of the Colorado River was no exception. After a 1,450-mile journey from its headwaters in the Rocky Mountains south into Mexico, the Colorado sustained verdant marshes teeming with life before emptying into the aquatic Eden of the upper Gulf of California. In 1922, the great naturalist Aldo Leopold canoed through the delta, which he described as "a milk and honey wilderness" and a land of "a hundred green lagoons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The skinny rings of ancient giant sequoias and foxtail pines hold a lesson that Californians are learning once again this winter: It can get very dry, sometimes for a single parched year, sometimes for withering decades. Drought has settled over the state like a dusty blanket, leaving much of the landscape a dreary brown. Receding reservoirs have exposed the ruins of long-forgotten towns. Some cities are rationing supplies and banning outdoor watering. Many growers are expecting no irrigation deliveries from the big government water projects that turned the state's belly into the nation's produce market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun and Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Over the last five years, the Salton Sea's shoreline has been steadily receding into the desert, creating a "bathtub ring" of exposed lake bed around the 360-square-mile body of murky water that straddles Imperial and Riverside counties. Once, it was one of the most productive fisheries and wildlife habitats in the state, but the shrinking Salton Sea has hit hard times. Along with imperiling the fish that live in the hyper-saline water and the migratory birds that stop along their annual journey, the shrinkage exposes a pesticide-laden lake bed that could contribute to the dust storms that have given the region some of the dirtiest air in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2011 | Bettina Boxall
The aqueduct stretched across the desert like an endless blue freight train, carrying its cargo of Colorado River water to a concrete building at the base of a craggy-faced mountain. Inside the plant, adorned with the seal of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, a set of massive pumps hoisted the water 441 feet high, disgorging it into a tunnel and the final leg of its journey from the Arizona border to a Riverside County reservoir. The Julian Hinds Pumping Plant is one of the hydraulic hearts of California's vast water supply system, built early in the last century to push water from where it is to where it isn't, no matter how many hundreds of miles of desert, mountains and valleys are in the way. Defying geography on such a grand scale takes energy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|