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Colorado River

SPORTS
December 9, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As winter storms move into the Southwest, Southern California's air conditioners click off and the Colorado River flows quietly through ancient canyons and marshes. The river is biding its time, storing its power behind dams for the wallop it will deliver when asked again to turn the mighty turbines that light up Los Angeles. Meanwhile, minimal power mean low flows--too low to launch anything but a canoe in some places.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2005 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California on Friday named Colorado River specialist Dennis B. Underwood as its chief executive officer and general manager. Underwood, known as an agency insider who has helped negotiate several controversial water deals, replaces Ronald R. Gastelum. Gastelum stepped down in December after five years of guiding the Los Angeles-based agency through water shortages and cutbacks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Drought-stressed Southern California water managers got some rare uplifting news Friday as the federal government announced that it would permit the Metropolitan Water District to take more than its annual share of water from the Colorado River. At the same time, state officials said copious rain and snowfall from March storms will enable them to increase water deliveries to the MWD and other municipal customers by mid-April.
NEWS
November 10, 1985 | TAD BARTIMUS, Associated Press
From glacial trickle to sluggish ditch, the Colorado River is a 1,440-mile spine of life. Everything it touches thrives and prospers. Everything else is sagebrush and sand. It is the American Nile, more precious than coal or timber or gold. Puny compared to the miles-wide Mississippi or the mighty, muddy Missouri, the Colorado sometimes acts more creek than river. But its history is linked with two of the world's wonders--the Grand Canyon and the Hoover Dam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Prodded by the Davis administration, negotiators for four embattled Southern California water districts indicated Wednesday that they are close to a compromise on the contentious issue of divvying up the state's share of the Colorado River. Richard Katz, lead water negotiator for Gov. Gray Davis, said legislation may be introduced as early as today to ratify the four agencies' agreement and allow the sale of water from Imperial Valley to arid San Diego County.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration has omitted any money from the federal budget to continue the cleanup of a huge uranium slag heap in southern Utah that has been leaking radioactive waste into the Colorado River. Perched about 750 feet from the river's edge near the small town of Moab, the waste heap is the size of a football field and contains 13 tons of material left over from a uranium mill that shut down in 1984.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Completing the most exhaustive overhaul of the Colorado River Aqueduct in five decades, the Metropolitan Water District began today to refill the system that delivers a billion gallons of water each day to 18 million people across Southern California. Two hundred and forty-two miles of aqueduct -- spanning desert and mountains from Lake Havasu to Lake Mathews near Riverside -- was shut down and drained Feb. 5 for inspection and repairs at a cost of $8.2 million, district officials said.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | CRAIG CHILDS
EVERY EVENING FOR two weeks, I have been walking down to the Colorado River where it passes through the bare stone desert of southeast Utah. I've been watching its whirling mud-brown water swell as it does this time every year, muscling up its banks in a dance choreographed by the melting snowpack of the southern Rockies, a couple of hundred miles upstream. This year the dance is a frenzy.
TRAVEL
December 2, 2001 | VANI RANGACHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
My shirt and shorts were stiff with sweat and dirt. My hair felt like strands of straw and was standing up at odd angles. I wore no makeup. My face felt as if it had been sandblasted, and bits of grit stuck to it. I was gross, grotty and grimy, and I loved every minute of getting to this state. Our family of four came from Los Angeles to explore the wild side of Vegas. No, not the casinos, but the wilderness that lies about 25 miles east of the flashing neon of the Strip.
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