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Colorado Street Bridge

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NEWS
June 14, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Colorado Street Bridge has the battered and trussed look of an accident survivor these days, with its graceful arches slung in puffy tarpaulins and an army of workers fussing at its sides. The deck, across which 5,000 vehicles used to glide daily, has long since been peeled away, exposing the bridge's ribs. But the beloved old structure, a favorite of landscape painters for almost 80 years, is definitely on the mend, city officials say. About halfway into the $27.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | By Joe Piasecki
Hoping to dissuade despondent people from leaping to their deaths from the Colorado Street Bridge, Pasadena officials plan to install signs that encourage those considering suicide to instead call for help. City workers will install two 12-by-18-inch metal signs at each end of the century-old bridge sometime over the next two months, Assistant City Manager Steve Mermell said. The signs will include the number of a suicide prevention hotline. “If we can save even one life with one reasonable step we can take, we should,” said Pasadena City Councilman Steve Madison, one for four elected city leaders to endorse the signs during a public meeting last week.
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NEWS
November 16, 1989
The city's landmark Colorado Street Bridge will be closed to traffic immediately while the city undertakes a structural analysis of the bridge to determine if it would be safe during an earthquake. The closure was approved Tuesday by the Pasadena Board of Directors, who also approved structural analysis for five other city-owned bridges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Joe Piasecki
Hoping to dissuade despondent people from leaping to their deaths from the Colorado Street Bridge, Pasadena officials plan to install signs that encourage those considering suicide to instead call for help. City workers will install two 12- by 18-inch metal signs at each end of the storied century-old bridge sometime over the next two months, Assistant City Manager Steve Mermell said. Proposed designs display the number of a suicide prevention hotline and messages such as “Life is worth living” and “There is hope” against a background image of the bridge on a sunny day. “If we can save even one life with one reasonable step we can take, we should,” said Pasadena City Councilman Steve Madison, one for four elected city leaders to endorse the signs during a public meeting on Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2013 | By Joe Piasecki
Hoping to dissuade despondent people from leaping to their deaths from the Colorado Street Bridge, Pasadena officials plan to install signs that encourage those considering suicide to instead call for help. City workers will install two 12-by-18-inch metal signs at each end of the century-old bridge sometime over the next two months, Assistant City Manager Steve Mermell said. The signs will include the number of a suicide prevention hotline. “If we can save even one life with one reasonable step we can take, we should,” said Pasadena City Councilman Steve Madison, one for four elected city leaders to endorse the signs during a public meeting last week.
NEWS
June 28, 1992
Re Colorado Street Bridge How annoying to read that $27.4 million is being spent to preserve a bridge that no longer serves any transportation purpose (Times, June 14.) Is it any wonder the city of Pasadena can't balance its budget? THOMAS KEISER Pasadena Editor's Note: Most of the money to repair the bridge--$20 million--is from the Federal Highway Administration, with the rest paid by the city and county.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
Attempts to resuscitate the Colorado Street Bridge in Pasadena (Times, Nov. 25) should be scrapped in the interest of fiscal sanity. There is no question that the $6 million Pasadena has pledged will double--at a time when we are confronting a crisis in public funding. I simply cannot fathom this bizarre focus on a web of rotting concrete, which is going to collapse anyway in a major seismic displacement. If we must insist on sustaining this sentimental journey of freezing ancient structures in place forever, we cannot have Peter Pan at the helm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2013 | By Joe Piasecki
Hoping to dissuade despondent people from leaping to their deaths from the Colorado Street Bridge, Pasadena officials plan to install signs that encourage those considering suicide to instead call for help. City workers will install two 12- by 18-inch metal signs at each end of the storied century-old bridge sometime over the next two months, Assistant City Manager Steve Mermell said. Proposed designs display the number of a suicide prevention hotline and messages such as “Life is worth living” and “There is hope” against a background image of the bridge on a sunny day. “If we can save even one life with one reasonable step we can take, we should,” said Pasadena City Councilman Steve Madison, one for four elected city leaders to endorse the signs during a public meeting on Monday.
NEWS
July 5, 1992
Re Thomas Keiser's letter concerning the expenditure of $27.4 million to preserve the Colorado Street Bridge, which no longer serves any transportation purpose (Times, June 28): The Editor's Note that followed said that $20 million of the money was from the Federal Highway Administration, leaving only some $7.4 million to be paid by the city and county. This seems to imply that since someone else's money is being spent, it is OK. At all levels of government, budget balancing is painful or impossible, and one of the reasons is that everyone thinks spending someone else's money is OK. There is no such thing as someone else's money; it comes from all of us. Mr. Keiser is right--we can't balance our budgets if we spend the money foolishly.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed restoration of the historic Colorado Street bridge is in jeopardy after the Federal Highway Administration refused to release $12.6 million for the $27.4-million project. The rehabilitation, planned for 10 years, was to begin in January. On Nov. 20, the Board of Directors approved a construction contract with Kiewit Pacific Co. to revamp the 77-year-old bridge spanning the Arroyo Seco. Highway Administrator Bruce Cannon told the city Nov. 21 that the project needed more study.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
First published on Nov. 27, 2011. Revised and expanded in early 2012. It's 1922, and nothing much is up in Pasadena. Not among the orange groves, not along the leafy streets. Just as the little old ladies like it. But wait. Down in the Arroyo Seco, a crew has just started erecting some kind of stadium. On Pepper Street, Mallie Robinson's 3-year-old son may already be showing signs of amazing athleticism. Over at Polytechnic School, a tall 10-year-old named Julia McWilliams is developing the taste and aplomb that will make her America's best-known chef.
HOME & GARDEN
June 2, 2005 | Steven Barrie-Anthony
Haggard and achy at day's end and still not home. Talk radio blares about another highway shooting, and you think: no wonder. Staring through the windshield, you imagine trading in the car for a helicopter or hovercraft or hot air balloon, anything to avoid the freeways. Anything to float above this. Anywhere but here. But here you remain. Traffic's not going anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1998 | BOOTH MOORE
The Chicago-to-Los Angeles Route 66 was founded in 1926. "The Mother Road," as John Steinbeck dubbed it in his novel "The Grapes of Wrath," became the nation's principal east-west artery for Depression-era migrants in search of opportunity, and a postwar generation of recreational drivers eager to explore the West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Stetson and denims, Pasadena Mayor Rick Cole rode a balky palomino pony onto the Colorado Street Bridge on Monday, officially reopening the 80-year-old landmark after nearly four years of reconstruction. The span became Pasadena's leading earthquake casualty when chunks of concrete began working their way loose and plummeting into the Arroyo Seco--160 feet below--after the 1987 Whittier Narrows temblor. The bridge was closed in 1989 by safety inspectors.
NEWS
July 5, 1992
Re Thomas Keiser's letter concerning the expenditure of $27.4 million to preserve the Colorado Street Bridge, which no longer serves any transportation purpose (Times, June 28): The Editor's Note that followed said that $20 million of the money was from the Federal Highway Administration, leaving only some $7.4 million to be paid by the city and county. This seems to imply that since someone else's money is being spent, it is OK. At all levels of government, budget balancing is painful or impossible, and one of the reasons is that everyone thinks spending someone else's money is OK. There is no such thing as someone else's money; it comes from all of us. Mr. Keiser is right--we can't balance our budgets if we spend the money foolishly.
NEWS
June 28, 1992
Re Colorado Street Bridge How annoying to read that $27.4 million is being spent to preserve a bridge that no longer serves any transportation purpose (Times, June 14.) Is it any wonder the city of Pasadena can't balance its budget? THOMAS KEISER Pasadena Editor's Note: Most of the money to repair the bridge--$20 million--is from the Federal Highway Administration, with the rest paid by the city and county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1988
Pasadena's landmark Colorado Street Bridge across the Arroyo Seco will be restored to its original grandeur and rebuilt to last another 75 years with a $12.7-million federal grant, officials announced Tuesday. The announcement by Pasadena Mayor William Thomson and U.S. Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.) of the Federal Highway Administration grant was seen by city officials and preservationists as a triumphal end to a decade of efforts to save the span built in 1913.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1985
I find Chief Gates' remarks on Meese's view of the Miranda rule interesting on two counts. First, Gates writes that "unfortunately we in law enforcement are not gifted with the profound thinking and writing skills of your editorial staff." It is obvious that no one would ever accuse Gates of profound thought. Second, why is it that the only argument that politicians (elected or appointed) can ever muster about quite serious constitutional issues is that a majority of the people are opposed or in favor of something?
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Colorado Street Bridge has the battered and trussed look of an accident survivor these days, with its graceful arches slung in puffy tarpaulins and an army of workers fussing at its sides. The deck, across which 5,000 vehicles used to glide daily, has long since been peeled away, exposing the bridge's ribs. But the beloved old structure, a favorite of landscape painters for almost 80 years, is definitely on the mend, city officials say. About halfway into the $27.
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