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SCIENCE
April 27, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A single sigmoidoscopy between ages 55 and 64 can reduce deaths from colorectal cancer by at least 43%, British researchers reported Tuesday. The results from the first large randomized trial of sigmoidoscopy show that it is a more effective tool than mammography for breast cancer or PSA tests for prostate cancer, and confirm current U.S. guidelines suggesting regular sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy to screen for colorectal cancer. "If sigmoidoscopy can yield these results, colonoscopy should yield even better results" because it explores the entire bowel, said Dr. Eric Esrailian, a gastroenterologist at UCLA's Reagan Medical Center.
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SCIENCE
September 18, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Getting a colonoscopy is not something most people look forward to -- but a new analysis suggests that it's worth it to follow screening recommendations and have the test done every 10 years (or every five for those at high risk.) Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday, Harvard researcher Reiko Nishihara and co-authors assessed colonoscopy use, colorectal cancer cases and colorectal cancer deaths among participants in the multidecade Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study.
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HEALTH
April 10, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Screening longtime tobacco users for lung cancer would be less costly than the widely accepted practice of screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers and would reduce the death toll of lung cancer by an estimated 15,000 lives a year, according to a study released Monday that is likely to ignite debate on expanding healthcare coverage for smokers. Using the financial standards generally employed by health insurance companies, a group of actuarial economists calculated that annual low-dose CT scans of middle-aged Americans who have smoked the equivalent of a pack of cigarettes every day for 30 years would cost each insured American an extra 76 cents a month.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Contrary to popular belief among physicians and patients, the family of hypertension drugs known as beta-blockers does not prevent development of colon and rectal cancer, German researchers reported Monday. In fact, long-term use of the drugs might even be associated with an increased risk of developing an advanced form of the disease, they said. Beta-blockers are a family of drugs that reduce blood pressure and improve heart function by reducing the body's response to stress hormones such as epinephrine and norepinephrine.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Men and women may need different screening guidelines for colonoscopies because of varying tumor rates between the genders. A study released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. analyzed the results of 44,350 colonoscopy screenings over four years; the tests covered adenomas (benign tumors), advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer. Generally, screenings are recommended for men and women starting at age age 50 because colorectal rates begin to climb in the following decade.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Researchers have discovered an important step in a process of a gene mutation that appears to play a crucial role in the development of colon cancers, the second most prevalent form of cancer. In two separate studies published simultaneously in the current issue of Nature, the British science journal, researchers said they found that a normal gene, which is called ras and is found in cells lining the colon and rectum, can mutate into an oncogene that spurs cancerous growth.
SCIENCE
September 18, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Getting a colonoscopy is not something most people look forward to -- but a new analysis suggests that it's worth it to follow screening recommendations and have the test done every 10 years (or every five for those at high risk.) Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday, Harvard researcher Reiko Nishihara and co-authors assessed colonoscopy use, colorectal cancer cases and colorectal cancer deaths among participants in the multidecade Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study.
HEALTH
May 30, 2011 | By Pamela M. Davis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My mother has always had a special way of teaching me lessons, and a recent discussion about her healthcare was no exception. She knows that healthcare costs are an area of concern for our country and for her doctor-daughter. We all hear daily from the pundits that we must tame Medicare or face financial ruin. This focus on Medicare leaves the aging feeling that their future health and well-being may be jeopardized by attempts to reduce what is spent on them in an effort to hold down the costs for the younger population.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Cancer death rates are still declining in the U.S., but some are declining faster than others -- and cancer remains the leading cause of death for Americans younger than 85. In short, we've made progress against the disease, but more work needs to be done. In an annual report released Friday, the American Cancer Society estimated that 1,596,670 new cancer diagnoses and more than 570,000 cancer deaths are expected to occur this year. It also announced that death rates fell by about 22% for men and 14% for women between 1990 and 2007.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1986 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
City of Hope Medical Center officials received more than 350 telephone calls Tuesday from cancer patients hoping to take part in an experimental treatment program that involves activating immune system cells with a compound called interleukin-2, which the National Cancer Institute believes holds promise for treating advanced cases.
HEALTH
April 10, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Screening longtime tobacco users for lung cancer would be less costly than the widely accepted practice of screening for breast, cervical and colorectal cancers and would reduce the death toll of lung cancer by an estimated 15,000 lives a year, according to a study released Monday that is likely to ignite debate on expanding healthcare coverage for smokers. Using the financial standards generally employed by health insurance companies, a group of actuarial economists calculated that annual low-dose CT scans of middle-aged Americans who have smoked the equivalent of a pack of cigarettes every day for 30 years would cost each insured American an extra 76 cents a month.
HEALTH
January 17, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A medication for people with advanced colorectal cancer who have exhausted all other treatment options appears to slow tumor growth and extend life, according to new data. Bayer HealthCare, the makers of regorafenib, said it would seek Food and Drug Administration approval of the medication this year. If approved, regorafenib would be the first new treatment for colorectal cancer in more than five years. Although chemotherapy and other medications can extend life in people with metastatic cancer (cancer that has spread throughout the body)
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Pour yourself a nice big bowl of whole-grain cereal. A study finds that diets high in fiber, particularly from cereal and whole grains, may reduce the risk of colon cancer. The study, released online today in the British Medical Journal , is a meta-analysis of 25 studies that examined the relationship between dietary fiber and colorectal cancer, the third most common type of cancer diagnosed among men and women in the U.S., according to the American Cancer Society. Previous studies have shown that dietary fiber may decrease colorectal cancer risk, but the authors of this study said it's not apparent whether certain types of fiber are key. After analyzing these papers they found that for every 10 grams of dietary fiber and cereal fiber there was a 10% reduced risk of colorectal cancer.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Men and women may need different screening guidelines for colonoscopies because of varying tumor rates between the genders. A study released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. analyzed the results of 44,350 colonoscopy screenings over four years; the tests covered adenomas (benign tumors), advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer. Generally, screenings are recommended for men and women starting at age age 50 because colorectal rates begin to climb in the following decade.
HEALTH
July 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Increased screening during the last decade for colorectal cancer, the nation's second-leading cause of cancer deaths, has put a sharp dent in the prevalence of the disease and in the number of deaths resulting from it, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. As screening for the disease among those ages 50 to 75 increased from half to two-thirds of that population, the prevalence rate fell from 52.3 cases per 100,000 in 2003 to 45.4 per 100,000 in 2007. The death rate fell from 19 per 100,000 to 16.7 per 100,000 during the same period, the agency reported in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report . Those declines represent 66,000 fewer cancers during the period and 32,000 fewer deaths, the agency found.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Cancer death rates are still declining in the U.S., but some are declining faster than others -- and cancer remains the leading cause of death for Americans younger than 85. In short, we've made progress against the disease, but more work needs to be done. In an annual report released Friday, the American Cancer Society estimated that 1,596,670 new cancer diagnoses and more than 570,000 cancer deaths are expected to occur this year. It also announced that death rates fell by about 22% for men and 14% for women between 1990 and 2007.
HEALTH
June 28, 1999
Colorectal cancer kills more than 55,000 Americans each year. It's a cancer of the colon and/or rectum, which are both part of the large intestine. Here are some more facts--and suggestions to lower your risk: * Anyone can get colorectal cancer, but it usually strikes people older than 50. * Colorectal cancer is the No. 2 cause of death from cancer. (Lung cancer is No. 1.) * Get screened regularly after age 50. These tests can find noncancerous tumors--polyps--that sometimes turn into cancer.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | From Reuters
Men and women over 50 should have regular screenings for colorectal cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths, U.S. health officials said Thursday. A Public Health Service advisory panel said people over 50 should have a stool sample tested annually for blood that can be caused in some cases by cancer of the colon or rectum. It also recommended having a doctor regularly look inside the rectum and lower colon with an instrument called a sigmoidoscope.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
In treating cancer, every bit of knowledge could help. Now researchers have found that adding the experimental drug Zaltrap in a chemotherapy regimen may slightly prolong survival in patients with advanced colorectal cancer and slow the progression of the disease, companies Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals announced Monday. The companies said data from a clinical trial, in which 1,226 patients on chemotherapy received Zaltrap (generic name: aflibercept) or a placebo, will be presented at a conference this month.
HEALTH
May 30, 2011 | By Pamela M. Davis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My mother has always had a special way of teaching me lessons, and a recent discussion about her healthcare was no exception. She knows that healthcare costs are an area of concern for our country and for her doctor-daughter. We all hear daily from the pundits that we must tame Medicare or face financial ruin. This focus on Medicare leaves the aging feeling that their future health and well-being may be jeopardized by attempts to reduce what is spent on them in an effort to hold down the costs for the younger population.
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